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NHTSA Data Shows that Tesla has the Least Amount of Recalls

Based on public data released by NHTSA, Tesla has had the least amount of vehicle recalls compared to other large car manufacturers from early 2020 to 2022. (source: Reuters)

In addition to this, over one-third of their recalls are solved by over-the-air software updates, making Tesla the only car company currently focusing on solving hardware issues through software.


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Tell that to the family of the person who died because of a “trivial software update”... I do hope if you have a family they will find that excuse to be of little solace.
I'm sure the lawyers made that very case. But you know very well that is anecdotal. Tesla now puts 1M new cars on the road every year.
 
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I doubt anyone died because of the bug in the seatbelt warning chime, and the rolling stop code was still more conservative than every other car on the road. I don't think anyone needs any solace.
Agreed. The rolling stop thing wasn't a safety issue. It was a Tesla thing that caught the eye of someone in DOT. They were pissed that an actual Tesla programmer consciously wrote code to ignore a stop sign (even though that is how 99% of people handle stop signs).
 
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Agreed. The rolling stop thing wasn't a safety issue. It was a Tesla thing that caught the eye of someone in DOT. They were pissed that an actual Tesla programmer consciously wrote code to ignore a stop sign (even though that is how 99% of people handle stop signs).
Yup. I would argue that coming to a full stop is more likely to cause accidents - no one expects a car to actually stop before the stop sign or come to a full stop unless there's a reason to. Typically, as you approach a stop sign in those situations you start looking for traffic/pedestrians and moving forward, expecting the car in front of you to move. I can easily see some minor fender benders caused by a Tesla stopping when it doesn't 'need' to and people aren't expecting it to.
 
Yup. I would argue that coming to a full stop is more likely to cause accidents - no one expects a car to actually stop before the stop sign or come to a full stop unless there's a reason to. Typically, as you approach a stop sign in those situations you start looking for traffic/pedestrians and moving forward, expecting the car in front of you to move. I can easily see some minor fender benders caused by a Tesla stopping when it doesn't 'need' to and people aren't expecting it to.
Exactly. Imagine Tesla made Autopilot only operate at the speed limit or less? They allow you to break that law because to max out at the speed limit on a freeway can cause anger, aggression, road rage and death. Humans are flawed beings.
 
I can easily see some minor fender benders caused by a Tesla stopping when it doesn't 'need' to and people aren't expecting it to.

You can (and should) be ticketed for failing to stop. The fact that most of us adults use short cuts is not an excuse for them. We all (obviously) break the law with our rolling stops but that doesn’t make it okay. Nor does it mean that following the law puts the driver in front at fault. No insurance company would even try to argue that the driver who came to the full stop, and was rear-ended, was at fault...

There is a reason that failing to come to a FULL STOP even once is an auto fail for most driving tests. Don’t write software that ignores it and then complain about “innovation being stifled”…
 
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Since this is showing the total number of recalls it should be worth noting that Ford and GM have many times the number of models and then many times the number of variants for each of those models compared to Tesla. Based on that I’m not surprised in the total size difference. I think this is a non-story except that as a Tesla owner I’m happy to see Tesla taking these seriously and issuing recalls regardless of how trivial some might think they are.
 
Also the boombox changed to in Park only. I guess poor unsuspecting pedestrians would hear an ice cream truck instead of a whirring sound. Musk tweeted something about 'fun police' on that one. Its a software update, so its trivial.

Isn't it a bit ironic that the requiring whirring sound law was put in place because EVs (and hybrids) were too quiet. Making another louder noise is not allowed.
I'm curious what a group of blind people would say, rather than regulators. Is the whirring sound easier to hear for them and easier to positionally locate...or not?
 
You can (and should) be ticketed for failing to stop. The fact that most of us adults use short cuts is not an excuse for them. We all (obviously) break the law with our rolling stops but that doesn’t make it okay. Nor does it mean that following the law puts the driver in front at fault. No insurance company would even try to argue that the driver who came to the full stop, and was rear-ended, was at fault...

There is a reason that failing to come to a FULL STOP even once is an auto fail for most driving tests. Don’t write software that ignores it and then complain about “innovation being stifled”…
there's a difference between being at fault and causing an accident and no one is complaining that that is 'stifling innovation.'
 
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Agreed. The rolling stop thing wasn't a safety issue. It was a Tesla thing that caught the eye of someone in DOT. They were pissed that an actual Tesla programmer consciously wrote code to ignore a stop sign (even though that is how 99% of people handle stop signs).
I agree that intentionally rolling through a stop sign isn't right. But that is different than ignoring it. Ignoring would mean not even slowing down.
Words matter. Non-Tesla owners would short cut your statement and someone else would hear it as just going through a stop sign.

Both before and after the fix I found that many times FSD beta is too careful, creeping up and bit, almost stopping, creeping up some more, etc. All with no one around and a clear view everywhere
 
Isn't it a bit ironic that the requiring whirring sound law was put in place because EVs (and hybrids) were too quiet. Making another louder noise is not allowed.
I'm curious what a group of blind people would say, rather than regulators. Is the whirring sound easier to hear for them and easier to positionally locate...or not?
No, the blind people were running after Teslas, with ice cream money in hand. It was anarchy.
 
I agree that intentionally rolling through a stop sign isn't right. But that is different than ignoring it. Ignoring would mean not even slowing down.
Words matter. Non-Tesla owners would short cut your statement and someone else would hear it as just going through a stop sign.

Both before and after the fix I found that many times FSD beta is too careful, creeping up and bit, almost stopping, creeping up some more, etc. All with no one around and a clear view everywhere
The other thing to note is the criteria for a 'rolling stop' were pretty strict - 4 way stop, no other cars, bikes or pedestrians, clear lines of sight and the car would still slow down significantly (about 3 mph, IIRC,) so this wasn't a 'Texas stop' and was still slower than what most people tend to slow down to and if any of the criteria weren't met the car came to a complete stop.

Realistically with FSD in it's current state, it takes about 5 minutes to get through a 4 way stop anyway. :/
 

whatthe2

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The other thing to note is the criteria for a 'rolling stop' were pretty strict - 4 way stop, no other cars, bikes or pedestrians, clear lines of sight and the car would still slow down significantly (about 3 mph, IIRC,) so this wasn't a 'Texas stop' and was still slower than what most people tend to slow down to and if any of the criteria weren't met the car came to a complete stop.

Realistically with FSD in it's current state, it takes about 5 minutes to get through a 4 way stop anyway. :/
Yeah I don’t think some people realize it wasn’t blowing through stop signs in a neighborhood. Makes complete sense to me. Same as setting FSD higher than the speed limit. If it were to limit me to the speed limit on the highway I’d have to be in the emergency lane to survive.
 

Boza

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Sep 24, 2021
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The other thing to note is the criteria for a 'rolling stop' were pretty strict - 4 way stop, no other cars, bikes or pedestrians, clear lines of sight and the car would still slow down significantly (about 3 mph, IIRC,) so this wasn't a 'Texas stop' and was still slower than what most people tend to slow down to and if any of the criteria weren't met the car came to a complete stop.

Realistically with FSD in it's current state, it takes about 5 minutes to get through a 4 way stop anyway. :/
One more reason why we are so far away from FSD. Human drivers do not always obey the traffic rules; often, with positive result of smoother traffic. The other thing is that we often tacitly/implicitly agree (sometimes only with a glance) to brake the rules so that all parties benefit from doing that.
FSD will have a very, very hard time to understand those social constructs until all cars are FSD.
 
One more reason why we are so far away from FSD. Human drivers do not always obey the traffic rules; often, with positive result of smoother traffic. The other thing is that we often tacitly/implicitly agree (sometimes only with a glance) to brake the rules so that all parties benefit from doing that.
FSD will have a very, very hard time to understand those social constructs until all cars are FSD.
Well ...the more people who have FSD, the better FDS will work for everyone. Eventually, the last human hold outs will start to drive like the automated cars and obey every rule.

While Tesla pioneers the technology, eventually, there will be a centrally-controlled system being developed by some national (eventually global) organization. At that point, FSD will work so well, a j-walker crossing the street will effect what a car does 4 blocks away, subtly slowing down along with all cars around it to make up for the 'biological anomaly'. 👾
 

Boza

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That will take a long time. And let’s be honest, what does Tesla has pioneered in the FSD space? All the current FSD features are available from other manufacturers. The difference is that they call them “driving assistance” and some are actually better implemented (e.g. lane change warning, adaptive cruise control).
 
That will take a long time. And let’s be honest, what does Tesla has pioneered in the FSD space? All the current FSD features are available from other manufacturers. The difference is that they call them “driving assistance” and some are actually better implemented (e.g. lane change warning, adaptive cruise control).
Tesla's FSD is significantly more capable than the 'driving assistance features' that I've seen in other cars, although you're correct, Tesla's blind spot monitoring and adaptive cruise are significantly below what others have.
 

Boza

2020 Model S LR+
Sep 24, 2021
856
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Tesla's FSD is significantly more capable than the 'driving assistance features' that I've seen in other cars, although you're correct, Tesla's blind spot monitoring and adaptive cruise are significantly below what others have.
What is the exact capability (production, not beta!) that they have above and beyond everyone else? I am serious - I might have missed something.
 

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