TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Ohmman's Model X - A One Month Perspective

Discussion in 'Model X' started by ohmman, May 23, 2016.

  1. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    We took delivery of our Model X on April 4th. Due to some issues (drooping falcon wing door, body panel alignment, fit and finish items), we had to return it to our Service Center, who kept it from April 26th through May 14th. The information in the following posts represent my impressions after about a month of ownership and possession of the vehicle.

    IMG_1815.JPG
     
    • Like x 12
  2. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    Interior Trim/Seats
    Our Model X is Pearl White with Ultra White interior and obeche matte trim in a premium upgrade package with 6 seats. We’re very happy with our choices. The Ultra White interior is comfortable, soft, and is holding up well so far. There was a spot of grease on the driver’s seat after our service center visit, which I was able to easily wipe up. Ultra White provides a real brightness to the inside of the vehicle and a space-age feel. The shiny seat backs, which I have yet to wrap, are holding up fine. They’re less of a turn-off than I thought they’d be from photos, and they actually sort of blend in at this point. I still plan to wrap them.

    The actively cooled seats are somewhat weak, as has been mentioned before. However, I can still feel the difference through jeans on all three speed settings. The active cooling fans have a cheap, very audible buzz to them when they’re running. That said, I have found it to be a great way to make myself comfortable on road trips with my wife. It’s more effective and targeted than the zoned AC, in my experience.

    I never found the first generation Model S seats to be uncomfortable, but the Model X seats are certainly an improvement. At 5’7”, I don’t think I get the full benefit of the seat upgrade. I believe taller people with longer torsos will notice the difference more distinctly than I do.

    The headrests on the front seats, which adjust automatically with the seat’s forward and backward positioning (a very strange connection, if you ask me), are a bit “wiggly” on the top. You don’t notice it until you’re on a very bumpy road, where mine will sometimes rattle.

    Legroom in the passenger front seat of the Model X feels inferior to that of the Model S. The footbed width in the X is approximately 15.5”. In my S, it is 18”. I noticed this immediately - I felt like I had to keep my feet closer together than I had in the S. It was most noticeable on the right side where it tapers inward due to the wheel well. Depth wise, maximum depth on the Model X is about 24”. On the Model S, it is 22.5”. In both cases, moving the seat to the maximum back position only leaves the rear seat with, at best, 7” of room between the rear seat and the seat back in front of it. That measurement represents having the 2nd row seat of the Model X in the farthest back position.

    My kids both say their legs feel more cramped in the X than in the S. Since the measurements of the back seat space seem similar, I think it has more to do with the high profile of the seats and the sloped seat back.

    We have used the third row sparingly, usually when giving rides to our kids’ friends. You can do a dance with the front and middle seat positioning to make it more comfortable, but with three rows of people we find that either one row suffers, or all rows suffer. That is, you can make the third row occupants very tight and everyone else comfortable, or you can spread the pain around.

    The 6 seat configuration works really well for us. We don’t use “easy entry” on the seats. Kids just climb between the seats into the third row, when needed. On a road trip to Big Sur, we stashed a cooler between them with a basket of activities on top of it. It worked out perfectly.

    Rear folding seats work well enough. While my X was at the Service Center, they replaced the seat backs with the newly designed ones from the recall. Raising back from a folded position is not ideal, but it’s not a terrible chore either. I’m surprised with the way that the seat material and electrical wiring are exposed when the seats are folded down. It feels unfinished and leaves open the potential for damage when stashing things in the back. I have documented my purchase of a cargo liner and find it to be indispensable for loading up the back of the X.

    Overall, storage in the X isn’t bad as long as you don’t have large items. We have been able to pack it up with more items than we’d have fit in our S - given that we still had four passengers. Once you are alone, the S has more overall storage with the folded seats.

    Conclusion
    The interior of the X is a definite step up from the S. It is more voluminous and with some caveats, is a more comfortable long haul/road trip ride. For our family of four, the storage for road trips and/or camping trips is more than adequate. The biggest drawbacks are the narrower footwell for the front passengers and the seat dance that is required when seating three rows. No discussion of the interior is complete without a reference to the windshield, but I plan to discuss that in greater detail in a future post.
     
    • Informative x 24
    • Like x 6
  3. calisnow

    calisnow Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    This is a great write-up, thank you. You have me more 'on the fence' than ever about which Tesla to get for the second one - another S or an X.
     
    • Like x 1
  4. SMSMD

    SMSMD Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2015
    Messages:
    854
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Thanks...very informative and helpful as always
     
  5. Rdainer

    Rdainer Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    Location:
    washington, dc
    Ohmman have you gone camping in your X yet? Do you have all weather floor liners? We are supposed to go this weekend and I'm already flipping out internally thinking about how dirty the car could get :(
     
  6. Lucidor

    Lucidor Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    Sverige
    Interesting comments on the limited legroom for the front passengers. I noticed the same during the "Meet Model X" event here in Sweden. No one else seemed to support my observation at the time, so I thought I was mistaken. I guess it is a consequence of the canopy being shifted forward compared to the Model S.
     
  7. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    Drive and Handling
    The Model X 90D drives very similarly to my 2014 P85 Model S. There are, however, some notable differences.

    The responsiveness of the X is excellent, but it doesn't have that "throw you back in the seat" feel that my P85 does. The car feels heavier under acceleration and in general driving. I believe being in a more upright seating position, and being higher on the roadway contribute to this "less sporty" feeling.

    The thing that strikes me the most when I move between the vehicles is the relative silence of my rear motor P85. The front motor whine is not very loud in the X, but it's noticeable especially at certain frequencies. On a recent drive on 101, I had the motor in one of those sweet spots and it was nagging. I imagine this is the same condition that applies on dual motor Model S vehicles; I don't have that reference for comparison.

    Regen profile appears to be different in the X than my S. It's possible this is a dual-motor/single-motor thing, or just due to the difference in the weight of the vehicle. Observationally, this seems to be a more gradual onset of regen in the X, increasing to a more aggressive final regen as I approach a stop. In the S, it seems more linear and more instantaneous.

    All of that said, comparing a CUV to a sedan isn't a fair comparison. The X drives incredibly better than the Honda Odyssey it replaced. It delivers exactly the driving experience we expected and desired when we reserved in 2014.
     
    • Informative x 6
    • Like x 2
    • Helpful x 1
  8. Scmbug

    Scmbug Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2013
    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Northern CA
    Thanks for the write up and mentioning a few things others haven't! I wonder if there's something to be done about the rattling headrests..
     
  9. Martin VanB

    Martin VanB Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2015
    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    Canada
    Great comments, I appreciate the insights. Beautiful Model X!
     
  10. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    Autopilot
    I will keep this brief, as everything that needs to be said about Autopilot has already been said in both the S and X forums. I was somewhat skeptical of how helpful Autopilot would be, considering I'd still be paying attention and keeping my hands on the wheel. I assumed it would be a benefit, but couldn't quantify how much. That is, until I took it on a longish road trip.

    At highway speed, it's excellent. It allows you to relax while still paying attention. I never felt the need to become distracted - I just enjoying not having to mentally lane keep the entire way. In most conditions in stop and go traffic, it's also a huge help. There is a lot of driver interaction in that situation and it's really nice being able to relax a bit while Autopilot handles things.

    The one area I was very uncomfortable was stop and go traffic where traffic would suddenly accelerate to 30+mph, and then slow to a stop. TACC took a lot longer than I'd have liked to begin braking, and I found myself taking over frequently. I'll disable it in this situation until there are some changes.

    Overall, I've very happy to have Autopilot and will prioritize taking the X over my non-AP Model S on any trip with a decent amount of highway driving.
     
    • Informative x 11
    • Like x 4
  11. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    Doors, Doors, Doors.
    It may have escaped the reader's notice that the Model X has some interesting doors. To state it mildly, I've been apprehensive about the falcon wing doors since I placed my reservation. Over the years, I've said that I ordered the X in spite of the doors. Still, I wanted to give them a fair shot when the X arrived. I didn't want to be the little kid who makes a face before he tries his food. Now, I've tried the food. And I must say, it's not my cup of tea.

    My first experience with the falcon wing doors was at delivery. They appeared to work well enough, and we drove the car home. Upon arriving in the garage, I tested the door sensors and the doors opened admirably. However, the passenger side door wouldn't close all the way. I had to force it closed, run a bunch of override procedures, and finally got it to operate properly. Not long after that, the driver's side falcon wing door started to droop closed whenever open (aka the "sinking falcon"). This was the final item that forced us to drop the X off at the Service Center for those couple of weeks and slew of repairs.

    Now that I have the car back, the driver's side door opens and stays open, but it makes a loud TWANG midway through the opening. Both doors make a popping sound when they close. I usually have to make some excuse if I'm showing them to people.

    These are all fixable issues, but they speak to the complicated nature of the doors, and the potential for longer term warranty issues. Those aside, there are also problems with functionality.

    We are your typical family of four. Two kids, past the toddler stage, who buckle themselves into boosters. The falcon wing doors are often touted as being helpful for parents trying to buckle their kids into seats, so this doesn't really apply much to us (except on occasion when the belt is twisted or some other complication exists). They also are meant to allow easy ingress/egress to the 3rd row. I mentioned before that we have a 6-seat configuration and kids usually just climb through the middle. So as far as the benefits of the doors, our family doesn't realize those. We do get to partake in the drawbacks, though.

    There is a tricky spot outside of the car just inside of the open front door. This exists on both sides, but I'll describe it from the driver's side since that's where I typically encounter it. Imagine being parked next to another car or obstruction - in a parking lot, for instance. You or your child open the falcon wing door, and you open the driver's side door. You plan to walk forward, toward the nose of the car, so typically you'd step back toward the opened traditional back door, close yours, and wait for your child. However, stepping back outside of the envelope of the front door means you're in the way of a closing falcon wing door. So you have to have this conversation with the rear seat passenger about when to close the door. Usually in my family that manifests as me saying "I'll get it after we walk away." It's an interaction that isn't a huge deal when the passenger is your kid, but if it's an adult, it seems like an unnecessary addition to the driver/passenger relationship.

    There are times when I think front suicide doors would make a better partner with those doors. You'd have the hinge on the same side as the falcon wing door, and getting out of the car you'd never be in the way of the closing falcon wing. But the last thing we need is more craziness.

    Other annoyances - my kids are a little afraid of them closing. They'll often hit the button and run to get away from the closing door (again, "I'll get it!"). My daughter cannot open the door because it's too difficult for her 6 year old hand to press the door handle. When opening the door, you have to push, then step back, if you have room, or step forward to the front of the door. Hopefully you don't have the driver's side door open at the same time, or you'll find yourself in that tricky spot again. I'm still not fully comfortable with the door swing clearing neighboring objects, though I imagine that'll come in time. The doors attract a lot of attention, something I don't really desire.

    So that's my take on the falcon wing doors. I almost always make a comment about them when I'm showing the car. "I wish it didn't. But it does. Here are the things the car does well, though."

    Oh, but what about those automated front doors? Well, I don't use auto-present since the doors themselves don't have proximity sensors in them. I don't want to ding a neighboring car for some added convenience. Stopping the doors when they are in the process of opening is always a little weird. They have a setting to which they want to open, based on the falcon wing door sensor. You have to grab and hold the door if you don't want it to open that much. It's not a struggle, but it's weird to fight the door. Auto-close is nice. I like being able to open my wife's door with the touchscreen when I'm picking her up. There are some benefits to the motors on the front doors, but I'm currently in a neutral position on them. I definitely have a negative outlook on auto-present for now, since I've heard about the doors hitting other people's vehicles.

    I might as well mention the liftgate. The Model X is a tall vehicle. The liftgate is larger than that of the Model S, and the spoiler is generally deployed (for those of us with an active spoiler) when it opens. Clearance isn't great indoors. I have it set to stop at a safe height, but anytime I'm outdoors, I wind up manually pushing it all the way open. This compares unfavorably to our Odyssey, whose tailgate could open fully in the garage, allowing incredible access to the rear cargo area. Hopefully Tesla will begin to use the roof mounted proximity sensor to make this more variable in future firmware.

    Conclusion on Doors
    It's probably clear I'd prefer standard doors front and back on the Model X. Well, too bad for me because the Model X has falcon wing doors. I'm adapting but I don't think I'll ever like or love them. If I were someone who carried adults or large children in the third row and had a 7-seat configuration, I may feel differently. Also, those who buckle three infants across in a 7-seat configuration may also find some benefits to the doors. However, I have to think that the majority of use cases aren't those.

    There is one thing that I think the falcon wing doors made possible, though.. and that's the next post.
     
    • Informative x 7
    • Like x 4
  12. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    Big Sky
    Is it possible, because the falcon wing doors precluded the availability of a pano roof, that the Tesla design team decided to just go ahead and make the windshield go all the way back? The other alternative would be very little overhead glass, and we know that Tesla likes overhead glass. I'm going to permit myself to make that assumption, because it gives me something to like about the falcon wing doors.

    The expansive windshield is one of my favorite parts of the vehicle, which surprised me. It doesn't take long before I get totally accustomed to driving with a full view. Then I get into my Model S and I almost feel like I'm ducking down to see through the windshield. We went on a trip to Big Sur, and driving through the tall redwoods in the Model X made it clear that this is the vehicle you want to take to the National Parks and on any other sightseeing road trip.

    The benefits to a taller, expansive view should be obvious, so I'll address the negative points. No, I didn't get a sunshade. Personally, I don't think it will solve the problem it intends to solve, unless it's a rollaway-style shade. A shade like the one they have provided so far is too unwieldy to install/uninstall on the fly or while driving. For me, the bigger problem is radiated heat. We've only had a couple of days 90F+ but the windshield really heated up. I had to aim the air conditioning vents at my forehead, but they are limited in vertical range, so I couldn't really shoot the air over my head (which I think would honestly be a perfectly fine solution). The car also heats up more when parked. I plan to investigate heat rejecting tint and find a solution. For now, I'm happy with it as-is.

    The other problem is ghosting. Yes, I have it. I get double/triple images just as bad or worse than the photos I've seen on this forum. It's an annoyance and it's worse than in other vehicles I've owned. I don't find it to be a safety hazard or terribly distracting, but I'm hopeful Tesla can do something about it.

    Until then, I'm going to enjoy the gorgeous view.

    Soon, I'll post my one month overall conclusion.
     
    • Informative x 7
    • Like x 5
  13. Roentgen

    Roentgen Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2016
    Messages:
    157
    Location:
    Southern California
    First, I really appreciate your indepth opinions. You have some really great insights in your posts, and reading these have been a pleasure.

    So, ohmman, I'm in a situation similar to yours: fam of four, two young kids, the oldest 5.

    We've never really had the FWD issues as yours, mainly because we're always opening the door for them, and closing them from the center console. When we park the car, we'll open the FWD first, then our own second (if not at the same time - since the car so conveniently brings up the door panel when entering park). This would pretty much eliminate the whole door issue you have. Similarly, when we're all loading into the car, we buckle the kids in first, get in the front, make sure all hands and feet are inside, we close all doors from the console.

    My younger kid (2yo) was also afraid of the doors closing when we first got the car. Not sure exactly what changed, but he started loving it soon after, letting out an excited giggle whenever they clicked shut. Maybe the enthusiasm of our older kid (5yo) had a calming influence on him.

    I know that may not be your desired solution, but maybe it'll help with any persisting issues you're experiencing.
     
    • Like x 2
    • Informative x 1
  14. Johan

    Johan Took a TSLA bear test. Came back negative.

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2012
    Messages:
    6,890
    Location:
    Drammen, Norway
    Thanks for the posts and taking the time to do the write up so systematically!

    You've confirmed some of my fears about the X and some of my impressions from a brief real life viewing when the demo car was visiting Norway. For reference I decided to cancel my MX reservation and after reading your impressions I believe this was a good decision. I should add that the substantial price increase I would have been subject to, due to the strong USD vs. NOK made the choice even easier.
     
    • Helpful x 1
  15. SMSMD

    SMSMD Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2015
    Messages:
    854
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Hail is a big concern for me...will have to watch the weather once I get my X...Thanks for your post
     
    • Like x 1
  16. calisnow

    calisnow Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Thanks again for the added posts OP about the doors. I'm beginning to think I'll give Tesla another year or two (or three) to iron out the wrinkles with the X, and just stick with a second S in the mean time. But I sure could use three rows of seating. :sigh:
     
  17. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Enemy of the Status Quo

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,551
    Location:
    United States
    Thanks for the thorough and thoughtful review, @ohmman

    Model X has improved dramatically over the past few months, but it does seem like there are still some wrinkles to be ironed out. The X sounds absolutely awesome to drive though, from everything I've read.
     
  18. Vitold

    Vitold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2015
    Messages:
    990
    Location:
    NM
    @ohmman, if FWd was working as designed (no quality issues) would you still prefer regular doors (or sliding?) over them?
     
  19. ohmman

    ohmman Maximum Plaid Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    4,818
    Location:
    North Bay, CA
    I would prefer regular doors. Elon says sliding doors constrain the proportions of the X to look more boxy like a van and have a higher coefficient of drag. Assuming that's true, and it seems valid enough, then I'd be happy with straight up swing 'em open doors. And I think the X would be a better car for it, if less flashy/eye catching. My opinion, of course. I know there are some falcon wing lovers out there who have a different opinion.
     
    • Like x 1
  20. calisnow

    calisnow Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    What worries me about FWD's is how they will perform (or not perform) 8-10 years and 200,000 miles from now when I'm on a long road trip somewhere in the middle of nowhere. My experience with complex power convertible tops in various cars has not been good as they age.

    Of course this is not a concern for folks who change cars frequently.
     

Share This Page