Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

One pedal mode for mcu1 ?

Kuhz

Active Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,899
2,061
Mars
No. At least not yet. And most MCU2 cars don’t have it either, because it has nothing to do with MCU or autopilot version. Only Model 3 and Raven S/X get it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wesley888

cucubits

Active Member
May 17, 2019
1,645
776
TX
From what I understand this feature is something related to the motors and/or their newer control systems.

But I'm wondering what is the one pedal mode anyway?

In older S-es if you let regen braking slow the car all the way down, it won't bring it to a complete stop. It disengages at about 5mph.
 

luckyj

Member
Dec 8, 2016
412
495
Northern Virginia, USA
In older S-es if you let regen braking slow the car all the way down, it won't bring it to a complete stop. It disengages at about 5mph.

Ah, gotcha. I actually think the smart Tesla folks need to figure out how to make vehicle decelaration consistent. Because depending on state of charge and battery pack temperature, regen differs. So decel changes. The same accelerator control inputs at one time can result in a different decel than another time. In my mind, that is a huge safety issue. We should not have to compensate for a system that changes deceleration based on conditions that frequently change.
 
  • Disagree
  • Like
Reactions: Chaserr and abasile

jerry33

(S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20
Mar 8, 2012
19,577
22,012
Texas
Ah, gotcha. I actually think the smart Tesla folks need to figure out how to make vehicle decelaration consistent. Because depending on state of charge and battery pack temperature, regen differs. So decel changes. The same accelerator control inputs at one time can result in a different decel than another time. In my mind, that is a huge safety issue. We should not have to compensate for a system that changes deceleration based on conditions that frequently change.
The oldest ones (like mine) have a different friction braking system, so there are a couple of things that can't be done, such as hill hold. (It will hold for a short time, which is enough for me, but it's not hill hold in the same way that the newer ones are).
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
5,995
4,608
MA, NH
Ah, gotcha. I actually think the smart Tesla folks need to figure out how to make vehicle decelaration consistent. Because depending on state of charge and battery pack temperature, regen differs. So decel changes. The same accelerator control inputs at one time can result in a different decel than another time. In my mind, that is a huge safety issue. We should not have to compensate for a system that changes deceleration based on conditions that frequently change.

That would waste fuel. Coasting is the most efficient, even more efficient than regen (if the opportunity to coast exists).
 
  • Like
Reactions: jerry33

emmz0r

Senior Software Engineer
Jul 12, 2018
1,155
926
Norway
Why doesn't use the brakes, like it already does the other way around?

When you brake it regens first, then if you need to brake more it actually brakes. Just apply the same logic ...

The way cheaper Nissan Leaf already does this.
 

thebishop

Member
Dec 14, 2014
223
189
Sweden
Ah, gotcha. I actually think the smart Tesla folks need to figure out how to make vehicle decelaration consistent. Because depending on state of charge and battery pack temperature, regen differs. So decel changes. The same accelerator control inputs at one time can result in a different decel than another time. In my mind, that is a huge safety issue. We should not have to compensate for a system that changes deceleration based on conditions that frequently change.

well, in my car I can always get different acceleration or retardation with the same input to drive / brake pedals. Simply by having different slippery roads (or perfect dry asphalt). If your driving is dependent on exactly the same behavior (or there being a huge safety issue ) by this, then I’m not sure you should be driving ;-)

that being said, it would be nice to fake the behavior for older drive trains with the breaks when getting close to 0.
 

serendipitous

Member
Sep 10, 2019
342
496
Maryland, USA
What's frustrating is that, in my experience, in the old "no creep" mode, it wasn't just that regen ended before you came to a complete stop - the car would creep and use power to keep going ~3-5mph instead of just coasting to a stop like I would have expected. Once stopped, it wouldn't creep again, but it refused to come to a stop unless you were going up a hill or used the brakes. I have a Raven S and I'm enjoying the new Hold stopping mode (one-pedal) but it seems silly that they didn't just let it coast to 0 and then apply brakes to hold - I would have been happy with that and it would have been available to pre-Raven cars, too...
 
  • Like
Reactions: ahhlun

Ostrichsak

Active Member
Sep 6, 2018
3,268
3,209
Colorado, USA
It's interesting that they do not enable it for the older cars, as AP will bring the car to a complete stop using the brakes. Perhaps later.
Exactly what I was going to post. AP1 can bring cars a complete stop so there's no reason that the software can't include full stop on accelerator pedal lift-off as well. Now that they did it for newer motor styles maybe they'll add this code for the older cars too. It should be as simple as telling it initiate the same full-stop & hold it does in AP for when it's not in AP.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ahhlun

abasile

Conscientious investor
Ah, gotcha. I actually think the smart Tesla folks need to figure out how to make vehicle decelaration consistent. Because depending on state of charge and battery pack temperature, regen differs. So decel changes. The same accelerator control inputs at one time can result in a different decel than another time. In my mind, that is a huge safety issue. We should not have to compensate for a system that changes deceleration based on conditions that frequently change.
It's not a safety issue. It's incumbent upon the driver to be aware of the level of available regen, just as it's important to be aware of road conditions and other factors.

The only way to achieve consistent deceleration via the accelerator pedal would be to waste energy, either by using the friction brakes or by dumping the energy via something like a heat sink. Over-use of the friction brakes will cause excessive brake wear, and possibly become a safety issue, when descending long mountain grades. (Being a mountain resident, I'm quite familiar with this.) I do not want our cars using the friction brakes unnecessarily! Rather, when regen is limited, we've trained ourselves to allow more room for deceleration.
 

ahhlun

Member
Sep 23, 2019
90
39
seattle
Thanks for all the input guys~ I don't even have a Tesla yes and is debating whether to get a CPO model S or new Model 3.
So just trying to understand the pro and cons for each~

I did enjoy my friend's i3's one pedal driving mode.

In normal city driving, I literally didn't have to press the brake pedal and I thought that was quite convenient.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top