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Opinions on Supercharging rates/reporting

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by cpa, Aug 15, 2015.

  1. cpa

    cpa Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    940
    Location:
    Central Valley
    Just asking everyone about Supercharging rates and whether Tesla should be contacted. But first a little background:

    In May, I was returning home and stopped to Supercharge at Silverthorne. I ambled over to the cabinet that houses all the chargers and whatnot, and I noticed that the latch was open and the padlock was hanging unlocked from the loop that fits into the hasp. I promptly called Tesla to report the situation thinking that they would want to send a technician out promptly to secure the cabinet and inspect their equipment. The individual that answered my call was confused as to why I was calling if I was able to Supercharge. After a few minutes of conversation the person said that he would make a note for the Supercharger team. Our conversation left me scratching my head about reporting Supercharger issues if the representatives are unclear on the subject.

    OK, so three times in the past three months I have encountered the following rates immediately upon plugging in. Each time I plugged in I was the only one charging.

    Glenwood Springs: 7AM, about 50 degrees, 21% battery----->53kW (I did not move as I was charging while eating breakfast and getting cleaned up, and one hour at that reduced rate was no big deal.)

    Ellensburg: 3:30PM, about 85 degrees, 15% battery------>31kW (I moved to a different stall after 5 minutes and got 106kW.)

    Ritzville: 7AM, about 60 degrees, 25% battery------>48 kW (Again, it was after rising but before eating and getting ready to leave, so this rate was OK for 75 minutes or so.)

    When we returned through Ritzville three days later, I plugged into another stall and received 115kW.

    I think we all agree that those initial rates are substantially slower than expected. Yet I was reluctant to call Tesla to report these slower rates--they are free after all--Tesla's resources are limited, and I would rather report inoperative or damaged Superchargers rather than perhaps an isolated occurrence that wastes time and money. Moreover, I would presume that Tesla keeps records of all Supercharger use and should be able to identify slow charging issues concurrently with each use and send out repairmen as necessary.

    Because of my previous contact with Tesla regarding the unsecured Supercharger cabinet at Silverthorne and the above reasoning, I opted not to report any of the reduced rates that I received.
     
  2. stevezzzz

    stevezzzz R;SigS;P85D;SigX

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Messages:
    6,062
    Location:
    Colorado
    I guess I've had better luck calling the Supercharger desk than you have. I think it's worthwhile to do so, particularly since your car's SOC when charging may not be married up with the telemetry that the Superchargers are known to provide to the mothership: Tesla doesn't pull logs on your car unless there's a good reason to do so. So letting the Supercharger team know when a particular pedestal or cabinet is performing under spec should be reported for the benefit of your fellow travelers who'll be charging at the same SpC after you.
     
  3. cpa

    cpa Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    940
    Location:
    Central Valley
    Thanks! I just did not know just what happens between the Supercharger data and headquarters each time we plug in. I shall do this if I encounter this situation in the future.
     
  4. wraithnot

    wraithnot Model S VIN #5785

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Messages:
    475
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Supercharging when the battery is cold can be painfully slow. If was cold the night before (and by cold, I mean 40F or less) and you try to supercharge the car first thing in the morning it will be painfully slow. This might explain your two slow morning sessions. The slow afternoon session that improved after you switched stalls sounds more like a hardware issue with the supercharger.

    It's hard to figure out exactly how battery temperature affects supercharger rates because we don't have direct access to the battery temperature. But I learned the hard way to always supercharge right after arriving at a destination rather than waiting until the morning when it's cold outside. At rapid city, I got 120 kW for a bit, but decided to call it a night and finish the next morning. The next morning after a somewhat cold night the charge started at something like 30 kW despite a really low state of charge and maxed out at 50 kW before the taper started lowering the rate again.
     
  5. mspohr

    mspohr Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,797
    Location:
    California
    A cold battery will definitely be slow to charge. It is best to charge when the battery is already warm. If you start with a cold battery, it will take a while for it to warm up and then it will charge faster.

    I've contacted the Supercharger support team on several occasions to report bad cables and stations which weren't working and they were always happy to receive my report and said they would have someone look into the issue.
     

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