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Ordering aftermarket body parts after an accident?

Hi, I have a front-ender and a rear-ender. Need to buy structural parts and skins.

Maybe this isn't the right forum, but does anyone know of aftermarket parts? Or a source for structural members?

Also, I need a service manual as all the lights are out. Need to track down what may have blown, and also it would be nice to have an illustrated parts breakdown.
 
Hi, I have a front-ender and a rear-ender. Need to buy structural parts and skins.

Maybe this isn't the right forum, but does anyone know of aftermarket parts? Or a source for structural members?

Also, I need a service manual as all the lights are out. Need to track down what may have blown, and also it would be nice to have an illustrated parts breakdown.
Tesla is openly hostile to any attempt to repair yourself and will only sell parts to authorized shops. There are no real aftermarket parts, and service manuals are only available in MA, nowhere else.

They also will not re-enable the car for driving by software unless it has been thoroughly inspected by one of these authorized shops.

Sorry, but I do wish you the best of luck in your repairs.
 
and service manuals are only available in MA, nowhere else.
Huh? Why in MA? Are they entirely web-based?

There are three certified body shops in Seattle, and I've talked to one, as well as Tesla Parts. Tesla will not sell structural parts to an individual.

Further, I have only liability insurance so there is no choice. And, I am not a typical DIYer; I've fully restored a severely damaged Lincoln and a Jetta. The model S is simple compared to these. Please don't answer questions that weren't asked.

For most cars there are aftermarket quarter-panels, wings, doors, bumper brackets, etc. There are tuners like Unplugged, but I don't really expect there to be aftermarket Tesla skins yet, tho it doesn't hurt to ask if anyone knows.

As I say, this may not be the right forum, but if anyone knows what I'm talking about please advise. Alternatively does anyone know of a Tesla technical forum?
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: jmmp85d691hp
You're getting the straight answer. You want a service manual. Tesla will not sell you one unless you live in MA--state law requires it to be available there so it is. Everywhere else you can't get one. You want to buy structural parts, Tesla will only sell to a certified shop. Do a few searches on the forum and you'll get a lot of information regarding folks trying to repair their Teslas (mostly salvage situations, though).
 
Don'tget upset with us, this is tesla's policy, not mine. I don't agree with it in the least, I'm just saying what it is. Sooner or later a lawsuit or two will probably change this. But for now tesla is being a real dick about diy and third party shops.

I don't doubt that you have the knowledge, that's not the problem. The problem is tesla.
 
The local Tesla store actually has a 'skate' on display (undercar for a 'D') and I took alot of pictures. The front section and back section are mainly one die-cast aluminum piece, which is disturbing. The front bolts and glues to the body rails, and the back is welded. However the back is a good 2' from the back of the car, so if that 2' is all that's deformed I'm in fairly good shape, although I read somewhere that a back quarter-panel is like $20k.

The body shop guy said that you can't pull on the frame like normal cars because it breaks the glue joints and the aluminum may tear. He also said that side impacts are the worst because the B pillar can take a Tesla trained body guy a week to fix. Wow.

There have been absolutely no body part changes since the S came out, so maybe it would be worth it to buy an older wrecked one (side impact maybe) to repair these two.
 
There have been absolutely no body part changes since the S came out, so maybe it would be worth it to buy an older wrecked one (side impact maybe) to repair these two.
I can't say for sure either way, but be careful with that assumption, Tesla claims they make on average about 20 physical changes to the vehicle every week, very few of those are obvious to the end users, but that doesn't mean they won't throw a wrench in to things. It is possible that you'll find one of those changes does in fact involve a body part.
 
I've seen the frequent evolution of these cars. But the structural members are unlikely to differ to a degree that they'd show; I can make any adjustments needed.

This does appear to be the solution. I've found a 2012 that's been flooded, a perfect donor car. It's whole electrical system is useless. I could likely sell the motor and drivetrain as that's sealed; I'll bet the inverter is sealed, so that could sell with the motor to someone in the local EV club. Probably other parts too, doors, etc, to help offset the cost.

All depends on how little I can get the donor car for. This is most probably far cheaper than buying the parts from Tesla, even if they'd sell to me.
 
Hi, did you get this resolved?
I need to do a rear quarter on an S. I have access to a good one from a wrecked car but most of the body shops I speak to say they can't work with a second hand panel.
I'd like to know if Its possible to:
A/ Get aftermarket panels
B/ Fit used panels
Thanks :)

A. As far as I know, you cannot just get an aftermarket body panel.

Please search my threads. I had two accidents. First one was almost $24k to fix. Replaced rear panel, structural bumper, trunk footwell pan (to get to the rear horizontal structural components. My saga is well documented,

For this thread, let's talk about accident #2. Rear corner panel dented. Had to replace the whole quarter panel. Cost ~$6.5k
IMG_0944.JPG


B)
I'll add, this kind of body work still requires significant disassembly, so that was most of the cost.

To meet Tesla's standard, you would need the jigs for alignment and proper tools and equipment for working with Aluminum welding.
 
  • Funny
Reactions: FlatSix911
We got a small crease in the rear passenger door, and our local Tesla-approved body shop, Peotter's in Summit, NJ, has given us an estimate of $5000 to fix it. They say they have to replace not just the door shell but the whole door with an upgraded handle. Does this sound right to you?
 

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