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Out of warranty model S needs new DC/DC converter - $3k invoice from Tesla Service

Does this invoice seem right for out of warranty repair?

Issue:
10 days ago I applied an update while parked in my garage. After it was "successful" I no longer could control the car through the app and there was no connection. The doors could open using the key fob, and all lights worked. However all screens were black and unresponsive. Could not put into drive or neutral. I tried to hard reset it with no luck. I contacted Tesla Service and they said they could not remotely help so I need to tow it to the service center. The service appointment was set for 5 days out which I didn't mind, but 5 days later I find out the car is completely unresponsive to the remote.

I have AAA so I asked them to tow it, but they did not have the equipment to slide the car out of my garage. instead I asked Tesla Service to send one of their approved tow companies to tow it, and they were able to slide it out of the garage and drop it off at the service center. $285.

After 5 days at the service center, they tell me the dc to dc converter needs to be replaced, and sent me this invoice. No other details.
 

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Mwolfe

Member
Feb 25, 2019
125
306
MI
Does this invoice seem right for out of warranty repair?

Issue:
10 days ago I applied an update while parked in my garage. After it was "successful" I no longer could control the car through the app and there was no connection. The doors could open using the key fob, and all lights worked. However all screens were black and unresponsive. Could not put into drive or neutral. I tried to hard reset it with no luck. I contacted Tesla Service and they said they could not remotely help so I need to tow it to the service center. The service appointment was set for 5 days out which I didn't mind, but 5 days later I find out the car is completely unresponsive to the remote.

I have AAA so I asked them to tow it, but they did not have the equipment to slide the car out of my garage. instead I asked Tesla Service to send one of their approved tow companies to tow it, and they were able to slide it out of the garage and drop it off at the service center. $285.

After 5 days at the service center, they tell me the dc to dc converter needs to be replaced, and sent me this invoice. No other details.
Send your receipt in to AAA and they will reimburse you.
 
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The diagnosis fee seems out of line to me. Other than that, the fix is in line with your symptoms. If you decline, how much are you on the hook for?
The diagnosis fee was basically for 2 hours of labor to find the issue. I don't know what I'd be on the hook for, I haven't approved the new estimate. I only approved the diagnosis which was around $300 before this quote.
 

gaswalla

Model S,3,X.. CT with Austin delivery
Sep 23, 2012
4,115
5,146
San Diego
sorry folks are only addressing the tow fee... it looks like you have an early Model S. The DC-DC converter can fail, but all it needs is a $12 fuse (yes that is correct). There are multiple threads on this topic - I could refer you to a guy in SoCal, but it looks like you're in the Bay Area. This should be a few hundred dollars max by a third party (literally 300 labor and 20 parts)
 
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gaswalla

Model S,3,X.. CT with Austin delivery
Sep 23, 2012
4,115
5,146
San Diego
quick google search (no relation or endorsement)


and, to do it yourself:
 
sorry folks are only addressing the tow fee... it looks like you have an early Model S. The DC-DC converter can fail, but all it needs is a $12 fuse (yes that is correct). There are multiple threads on this topic - I could refer you to a guy in SoCal, but it looks like you're in the Bay Area. This should be a few hundred dollars max by a third party (literally 300 labor and 20 party
Yes I have an early model s with gen 1 dc dc. I am aware of the fuse issues, which I could fix myself. However the Tesla tech told me the fuses are fine and it’s something internal.

Now knowing this, if I still had the car I would send it in for repair in the link you sent. Or I would swap it out for a $500 replacement on eBay. But swapping it out, I’m not sure if that would require firmware update/reinstall.

It’s crazy that they take (free) customers non working dcdc converters like mine, spend an hour repairing it, and then customers that need it are invoiced like it’s a new part. Plus 1.5 hours at $250 per hour of labor. I’ll probably do it since my car is already there and is basically fixed already (the tech already put in the part to confirm it works). I’m just waiting for a response from Tesla to why it’s so freaking expensive.
 
Aloha, Gang!

If you buy a used Model S Gen 1 DC-DC converter of the same p/n as the old one (6009170-00-J), does anyone know if the firmware in the replacement 6009170-00-J would typically match the firmware in the failed unit?

I replaced the Heater fuse (and the PTC) in my old Gen 1 DC-DC unit and put it back in, and now the Hi-Voltage connector doesn't click on. The charge port won't unlock (no click sound) and I get the message "Vehicle may not restart" - "Voltage low", you know the drill. 12v battery is a new Ohhmu. the 12-volt system seems fine. The 12v is fully charged. I've tried 'hard rebooting" the car. The only other thing I've touched - opened it up, in fact - is the DC-DC converter. I assume that I damaged something in the process.

I live in the mountains of coastal California. Getting the car towed is a $600 bill. Before buying a replacement DC-DC converter, my question is whether or not there's a likelihood of the car not starting due to firmware differences in an otherwise-good DC-DC converter.

Thanks for any advice you can offer!
 
quick google search (no relation or endorsement)


and, to do it yourself:
I am very lucky this Electrified garage location is 20 minutes from me. Wish I had the confidence to keep my new 22 MYLR...
 
Aloha, Gang!

If you buy a used Model S Gen 1 DC-DC converter of the same p/n as the old one (6009170-00-J), does anyone know if the firmware in the replacement 6009170-00-J would typically match the firmware in the failed unit?

I replaced the Heater fuse (and the PTC) in my old Gen 1 DC-DC unit and put it back in, and now the Hi-Voltage connector doesn't click on. The charge port won't unlock (no click sound) and I get the message "Vehicle may not restart" - "Voltage low", you know the drill. 12v battery is a new Ohhmu. the 12-volt system seems fine. The 12v is fully charged. I've tried 'hard rebooting" the car. The only other thing I've touched - opened it up, in fact - is the DC-DC converter. I assume that I damaged something in the process.

I live in the mountains of coastal California. Getting the car towed is a $600 bill. Before buying a replacement DC-DC converter, my question is whether or not there's a likelihood of the car not starting due to firmware differences in an otherwise-good DC-DC converter.

Thanks for any advice you can offer!
I would get the parts yourself and try the repair on your own. You can order the parts through the Tesla service site - it sends you to a place called jmstooling, or something, like that where you can order. You may spend hours doing it but you will know it's done right. Also - get the insulated tools and gloves - the voltages are dangerous - much more dangerous than 120V AC. Service manuals for Tesla are all online too and I will say are very well written. Step by step with pics. I don't get why the SC folks charge whatever they want on a day by day basis for simple labor. It's poor management at Tesla just a free for all.
 
@Amanita , why not contact the link above (shop in AZ) for advice...
My thought is that you just need to reload a fresh software install (via service mode since updates aren't coming around much for these classics)
Gaswalla, thanks for the tip. Thing is, I can't seem to get into service mode in the ways described in threads. My car just doesn't respond. I did get a recent software update, but without any effect on the problem. The error I'm getting is a BMS_f036 error. I can't find that reference anywhere on TMC. I shall call HybridReVolt tomorrow and see what they might have to say.

The 12volt system works just fine. The HI v system won't kick in. For example, when I try to unlock the charge port, I hear a faint click, but not the typically strong click when it unlocks normally. So, I can't charge the car. Nor can I drive.

Cheers and thanks, again!
 
I would get the parts yourself and try the repair on your own. You can order the parts through the Tesla service site - it sends you to a place called jmstooling, or something, like that where you can order. You may spend hours doing it but you will know it's done right. Also - get the insulated tools and gloves - the voltages are dangerous - much more dangerous than 120V AC. Service manuals for Tesla are all online too and I will say are very well written. Step by step with pics. I don't get why the SC folks charge whatever they want on a day by day basis for simple labor. It's poor management at Tesla just a free for all.
Thanks, tespdr! Yep, doing the repairs myself. All went well up until now. Replaced the rear door handle, and the instrument panel screen, installed a used PTC heater and changed the fuse in the DC-DC Converter. The car drove just fine prior to the PTC and DC-DC work. My fear is that I might've damaged the DC-DC when opening it. Just not sure what's next, but HybridReVolt.com is probably it!
 
  • Like
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Aloha, Gang!

If you buy a used Model S Gen 1 DC-DC converter of the same p/n as the old one (6009170-00-J), does anyone know if the firmware in the replacement 6009170-00-J would typically match the firmware in the failed unit?

I replaced the Heater fuse (and the PTC) in my old Gen 1 DC-DC unit and put it back in, and now the Hi-Voltage connector doesn't click on. The charge port won't unlock (no click sound) and I get the message "Vehicle may not restart" - "Voltage low", you know the drill. 12v battery is a new Ohhmu. the 12-volt system seems fine. The 12v is fully charged. I've tried 'hard rebooting" the car. The only other thing I've touched - opened it up, in fact - is the DC-DC converter. I assume that I damaged something in the process.

I live in the mountains of coastal California. Getting the car towed is a $600 bill. Before buying a replacement DC-DC converter, my question is whether or not there's a likelihood of the car not starting due to firmware differences in an otherwise-good DC-DC converter.

Thanks for any advice you can offer!
Just curious, what did you try to do when you opened the dcdc converter?
 

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