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Out of warranty repair price list?

Hello,

First off, excellent forum, love all the info on here!

I'm looking for a long term, low cost vehicle to replace my 2005 Lexus ES. It's has about 250k miles on it and has been really great. I've probably spent a few thousand dollars on it over and above normal maintenance costs (oil changes, tires, battery, etc). That was on stuff like, geez don't really even recall. Replacing a brake caliper, maybe an alternator I think, some leaky gaskets. etc. It gets about 20'ish mpg overall.

Looking to get a Model 3 primarily due to cheaper operating costs and being able to control costs of ownership as my wife and I reach retirement and are on fixed incomes. Thinking an EV would be the way to go with that. Lower/simpler overall cost of ownership.

Is that really a thing? Or is the little repair stuff that comes up on a Tesla make it just as expensive (or maybe more so) than an run of the mill ICE? Basically, over 20 years would say a Toyota Camry be overall cheaper to own than the Model 3?

I initially though the M3 would be a great choice, but after watching some videos about the little things that can go wrong and the repair costs associated, it has me wondering...

Your input in sincerely appreciated!
 

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
15,985
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Well, the oldest Model 3s in the world are less than 5 years old, so I don't think anyway can tell you about 20 years from now.

Even the oldest Model Ses, which were built very differently long before Tesla moved to a lot of things they do in the 3, are less than 10 years old today.

That said- there's simply a lot less stuff to fail.

Also there's a company that offers extended warranties for the Model 3 out to as long as 10 years from purchase for about 3k.


You can use code MJC4JI9375 for $100 off if interested.
 
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afadeev

Active Member
Feb 28, 2019
1,089
1,286
NYC
Looking to get a Model 3 primarily due to cheaper operating costs and being able to control costs of ownership as my wife and I reach retirement and are on fixed incomes. Thinking an EV would be the way to go with that. Lower/simpler overall cost of ownership.

Is that really a thing? Or is the little repair stuff that comes up on a Tesla make it just as expensive (or maybe more so) than an run of the mill ICE? Basically, over 20 years would say a Toyota Camry be overall cheaper to own than the Model 3?
There is no data on the issues that may pop up with Tesla ownerships over 20-year life cycle. Because the car has only been around for <5 years, and most Model 3's are still covered by factory warranty.
Tesla's warranty is 4 yr/50K miles for everything (similar to all luxury brands), and 8 yr/100 miles for powertrain (whatever is included in that). The challenge is taking advantage of that warranty, as Tesla's service center footprint expansion has been lagging far behind the growth in vehicle sales. In my neck of the woods, appointments can be scheduled only 3-4 weeks out. If it's something minor (e.g.: my passenger seat buttons keep falling off), this is bearable. If it's something major (suspension of drivetrain problems), you will need to fall back on a second car, or a rental, while you wait for your appointment window.

For that reason, I have recommended that my parents (and others on fixed income) avoid Tesla ownership. Things do go wrong with Tesla's at a higher-than-average rate (per Consumer Reports), so this "fewer parts to fail" logic falls short when the fewer parts fail more frequently (e.g.: universal front control arms defects). And when things fail, the service delays will be a major risk factor if it's your one and only car, and you have to rely on it for daily transportation.

Insurance rates are also significantly higher on Tesla's than comparable luxury cars. Never mind a Camry.

HTH,
a

P.S.: When you do have to pay for service, everything Tesla costs 2-3x what you would have expected. Tesla's monopoly on parts and body shops is a major challenge for post-accident repairs as well.

P.P.S.: See this thread: Tesla cancels appt [due to lack of parts - upper control arm]
 
Last edited:

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
15,985
31,199
NC
In my neck of the woods, appointments can be scheduled only 3-4 weeks out

That is, however, highly YMMV.

I can usually schedule for same week here.

OP can likely post in the sub forum for his region to get an idea what it's like there.

That said, since the pandemic labor and supply chain shortage such delays aren't at all Tesla specific- plenty of issues with other brands long service waits in some areas too.

Still, I'd certainly touch base with the locals for any given spot.



Insurance rates are also significantly higher on Tesla's than comparable luxury cars. Never mind a Camry.

That has absolutely not been true for myself or tons of others coming to Tesla from comparable luxury cars.

Insurance on my Model 3 is virtually identical to what it was on the Lexus IS350 it replaced for example.
 
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For that reason, I have recommended that my parents (also fixed income) stay away from Tesla ownership. But things do go wrong with it more than average (e.g.: front control arms defects). And when they do, the service delays will be a major risk factor if it's your one and only car, and you have to rely on it for daily transportation.
I guess someone got up on the wrong side of the flex cap.
I have a friend with a BMW that spends as much time under it as driving it.
Those parts aint cheap either.

I think you will find cars that already have 130k on them with no issues. I sure you
will also find other stuff.
As a fixed income person, I have had no issues in 2 years.
I also find the EV easyer to drive as you get older, nice big screen and quiet.
I would also dispute things go wrong more that other cars, hardly without facts.
Read along some stuff here and make up your own mind, but lost of people come
here to talk about problems and not how great it is.
 
There is no data on the issues that may pop up with Tesla ownerships over 20-year life cycle. Because the car has only been around for <5 years, and most Model 3's are still covered by factory warranty.
Tesla's warranty is 4 yr/50K miles for everything (similar to all luxury brands), and 8 yr/100 miles for powertrain (whatever is included in that). The challenge is taking advantage of that warranty, as Tesla's service center footprint expansion has been lagging far behind the growth in vehicle sales. In my neck of the woods, appointments can be scheduled only 3-4 weeks out. If it's something minor (e.g.: my passenger seat buttons keep falling off), this is bearable. If it's something major (suspension of drivetrain problems), you will need to fall back on a second car, or a rental, while you wait for your appointment window.

For that reason, I have recommended that my parents (and others on fixed income) avoid Tesla ownership. Things do go wrong with Tesla's at a higher-than-average rate (per Consumer Reports), so this "fewer parts to fail" logic falls short when the fewer parts fail more frequently (e.g.: universal front control arms defects). And when things fail, the service delays will be a major risk factor if it's your one and only car, and you have to rely on it for daily transportation.

Insurance rates are also significantly higher on Tesla's than comparable luxury cars. Never mind a Camry.

HTH,
a

P.S.: When you do have to pay for service, everything Tesla costs 2-3x what you would have expected. Tesla's monopoly on parts and body shops is a major challenge for post-accident repairs as well.

P.P.S.: See this thread: Tesla cancels appt [due to lack of parts - upper control arm]

I guess that's what I've been reading about. Sure, fewer parts to fail, but they are indeed expensive parts. I've also read comments about how Tesla's in general don't have the same level of fit and finish a traditional car maker has just due to experience in production processes for that type of thing. Reading about door handles, brake lights leaking, etc. make me wonder if the quality is really there for the long haul. I don't really question how long the motor will last, or the battery after that, but what about just the plain car itself? There are still a LOT of moving parts, maybe not as many, but still a lot and requiring specific service at a specific vendor to boot.
 
I guess someone got up on the wrong side of the flex cap.
I have a friend with a BMW that spends as much time under it as driving it.
Those parts aint cheap either.

I think you will find cars that already have 130k on them with no issues. I sure you
will also find other stuff.
As a fixed income person, I have had no issues in 2 years.
I also find the EV easyer to drive as you get older, nice big screen and quiet.
I would also dispute things go wrong more that other cars, hardly without facts.
Read along some stuff here and make up your own mind, but lost of people come
here to talk about problems and not how great it is.

Yes, thanks for the input.

I do see a lot of 100k mileage videos, most of the are pretty short duration, like they've owned the car 3 years. Obviously a lot of this is due to the fact the cars haven't been out that long, but given the things that can go wrong that I've seen about on youtube videos and the repair cost involved, I wanted to come here to see if there is a more general consensus on what the experience has been like.

I also realize that Telsa is probably getting better each iteration. They'll learn from their mistakes and make a better product each time, I don't doubt that, I'm just trying to judge where on the learning curve they are :).
 
For that reason, I have recommended that my parents (and others on fixed income) avoid Tesla ownership. Things do go wrong with Tesla's at a higher-than-average rate (per Consumer Reports),
For what it is worth, the CR reliability survey has the following reliability scores:

59 / average: Model 3
20 / much worse than average: Model S
18 / much worse than average: Model Y
5 / much worse than average: Model X

The Model X reliability problems are no surprise, given the reputation of its falcon-wing doors.
 
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Insurance rates are also significantly higher on Tesla's than comparable luxury cars. Never mind a Camry.

That has absolutely not been true for myself or tons of others coming to Tesla from comparable luxury cars.

Insurance on my Model 3 is virtually identical to what it was on the Lexus IS350 it replaced for example.

This is likely very much a YMMV depending on insurance company, region, etc.. Also, what your comparison car and its driver demographics are.

Insurance losses by make and model shows overall comparisons of insurance losses in the US, but each insurance company and each region is likely to vary from the overall.
 

dmurphy

Active Member
Supporting Member
That has absolutely not been true for myself or tons of others coming to Tesla from comparable luxury cars.

Insurance on my Model 3 is virtually identical to what it was on the Lexus IS350 it replaced for example.

Damn, you beat me to it.

Model 3? Cheaper to insure than my Cadillac.

Model X? Cheaper than the Buick it replaced. BUICK!

So, yeah. Spot on.
 

qdeathstar

Completely Serious
May 17, 2019
4,515
4,649
VB
I've watched many scary videos online in which Tesla owners (typically model X owners) quote exorbitant prices that Tesla quoted for repairing their cars.
Is there a comprehensive list of out of warranty repair costs for the model 3 yet?
From memory I believe the AC was $5000, each suspension spring was $1500, the media center computer was $2000-$4000, the door handle was $1000 and the fuel flap was $100.

If these are scary numbers to you may I suggest a 2003 Camry?

The model X is a 100k car…
 
Tesla out of warranty repairs are high no one is denying that. The problem comes from tesla’s control over parts distribution. Which is another factor in terms of high insurance premium. It’s actually cheaper to insure a 2021 Infiniti QX80 compared to my model 3. You won’t get far when you want to repair the vehicle yourself. Parts department will more likely not sell you anything and will interrogate you for said “part”.. it’s a well documented issue. Right to repair bill still hasn’t pass thru yet. I think when it passes repair cost will drop, parts centers will start selling us parts hopefully
 

dmurphy

Active Member
Supporting Member
Tesla out of warranty repairs are high no one is denying that. The problem comes from tesla’s control over parts distribution. Which is another factor in terms of high insurance premium. It’s actually cheaper to insure a 2021 Infiniti QX80 compared to my model 3. You won’t get far when you want to repair the vehicle yourself. Parts department will more likely not sell you anything and will interrogate you for said “part”.. it’s a well documented issue. Right to repair bill still hasn’t pass thru yet. I think when it passes repair cost will drop, parts centers will start selling us parts hopefully

Wholly disagree with pretty much, well, all of this.

Parts prices are fair. Who else sells a 12V battery for $85, installed?
I've ordered other parts *and had them delivered by mobile service*!
My insurance dropped when buying Model 3 compared to my Cadillac; Model X is cheaper than the BUICK it replaced.

So -- your mileage may vary, but none of what you said is a universal truth. By any stretch of the imagination.
 
Wholly disagree with pretty much, well, all of this.

Parts prices are fair. Who else sells a 12V battery for $85, installed?
I've ordered other parts *and had them delivered by mobile service*!
My insurance dropped when buying Model 3 compared to my Cadillac; Model X is cheaper than the BUICK it replaced.

So -- your mileage may vary, but none of what you said is a universal truth. By any stretch of the imagination.
I was unable to get a passenger side lower control arm I needed new from tesla. So I got it used. I put it on myself.

The math to your Buick vs Model X doesn’t make sense. 1 car cost $100k when new and I have yet to see a Buick cost anywhere near that. So automatically the Buick is cheaper. Traditionally model x will cost more. Just because you had 1 experience doesn’t mean it’s universally applied to every situation. Your age, location, driving history, etc. plays major roles in insurance premiums. If I remember correctly Tesla or Elon acknowledged insurance was high, and said something about rolling out their own insurance to combat the issue.

Tesla do breakdown, and do have issues. I personally work on my model 3. I can’t do diagnostics with the software on my own. Tesla doesn’t allow it. But I can do mechanical repairs if I use eBay lol. Hopefully over the years it gets easier and easier to work with tesla. But until then this is my experience
 

dmurphy

Active Member
Supporting Member
I was unable to get a passenger side lower control arm I needed new from tesla. So I got it used. I put it on myself.

Not a difficult task, but right now there are some pretty serious constraints on new parts, especially those. With the supply chain as disastrous as it is, I'm willing to cut everyone a wide swath for parts availability. I'm at 11 months and counting for some network switches at work ...
The math to your Buick vs Model X doesn’t make sense. 1 car cost $100k when new and I have yet to see a Buick cost anywhere near that. So automatically the Buick is cheaper. Traditionally model x will cost more. Just because you had 1 experience doesn’t mean it’s universally applied to every situation. Your age, location, driving history, etc. plays major roles in insurance premiums.

Sense or not, what I'm saying is that it's the case that my insurance went DOWN from Buick to Tesla. There is no universal truth - Teslas aren't "automatically" more expensive to insure. As you said - lots of things factor into insurance - even your neighbor could have wildly different rates. Mine are attached; Vehicle 1 is the Model 3. Vehicle 2 is the Model X. (Those are 6-month numbers, BTW.)

Tesla do breakdown, and do have issues. I personally work on my model 3. I can’t do diagnostics with the software on my own. Tesla doesn’t allow it. But I can do mechanical repairs if I use eBay lol. Hopefully over the years it gets easier and easier to work with tesla. But until then this is my experience

Of course they do break down, and yes you absolutely CAN do diagnostics with their own software. You'd have to subscribe to it, but you do have the ability to gain access to it. Not really any different than an ALLDATA or GM Techline subscription, for example.

 

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