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StealthP3D

Well-Known Member
Dec 12, 2018
8,735
64,348
Maple Falls, WA
We have a ski cabin in the middle of a PNW rainforest. It's in a river valley in the North Cascades and we can get a fair bit of snow. Last winter I charged with a 120V extension cord with a Mobile Connector sitting in the rain and snow. It worked fine with not a single fault and the Mobile Connector came out looking like new:

20190213_103744sm.jpg


20190214_144927sm.jpg

Yes, that's a Mobile Connector under the snowpack happily charging away.

But dealing with the wet equipment was not ideal and Tesla had shipped us a free HPWC as part of the Referral Program. Since we already had one mounted at our house, I decided to install the new one by the driveway of our ski cabin. Even though it's rated to be installed out in the weather, everything in a rain forest eventually turns green. There is a lot of moss, lichen, needles and leaves that fall from the surrounding trees. Even water dripping off the trees has a green color to it. And we get a lot of rain, followed by snow and hard freezes. The charge cable would turn into a "snow/ice rope" which would be difficult to uncoil.

This fall, urged on by the chill in the air, I designed and built this little charging kiosk:

20191031_143503C.jpg

Almost finished. I just need to finish backfilling the trench and install a copper ridge cap to keep the moss and fungus from growing on the cedar shingles. Copper slowly leaches over the roof as it ages and acts as a fungicide. It probably won't be too long before the brightness goes away and develops a nice aged patina.

Because this structure is not heated it was important to make sure the cedar roof breathes properly because it will be wet most of the year. So the horizontal nailers are also rot-resistant cedar and I stapled some leftover roofing breather material to the face of them so the back sides of the shingles can breathe.

All the rocks at the base came out of the trench I dug with a pick-axe and shovel so you can imagine the trenching was not fast or easy!

All of the materials (including the 9' pressure treated 6 x 6) were discarded scraps from other projects except for:

Cedar Shingles (under $90)
SS (916) roofing nails (under $50)
Copper flashing for the ridge cap ($110 as I had to buy enough for 2 1/2 roofs)
Wood sealer ($22)
bag of concrete ($5)
#6 Electrical wire, 1" sch. 80 conduit, fittings, 60 A breaker, caution tape, PVC glue ($165 as I ran an extra #6 conductor in case someone ever wanted to convert it to a NEMA 14-50)

Total: Under $440 before sales tax (thanks to Elon for the signed HPWC!)

I took the copper sheet to a local small heating and air conditioning shop and asked the secretary if she knew anyone with a sheet metal brake so I could get the ridge cap formed into a "V". The young installer who happened to be in the office overheard my question and immediately offered to bend it on the spot. He brought it back out in about 4 minutes and told me there was no charge. I still need a 5" sheet metal tool to properly form the ends into nice drip edges. Photo with the ridge cap installed but without the ends finished:
20191114_152635C.jpg


Eventually, these rocks will be covered in moss and I'll be planting some native sword ferns around the sides and back. This is a welcome addition to EV ownership in the mountains and means I can defrost the car on winter ski mornings without watching the battery meter go backward! Now, bring on the snow, please!
 

eprosenx

Active Member
May 30, 2018
2,065
2,482
Beaverton, OR
We have a ski cabin in the middle of a PNW rainforest. It's in a river valley in the North Cascades and we can get a fair bit of snow. Last winter I charged with a 120V extension cord with a Mobile Connector sitting in the rain and snow. It worked fine with not a single fault and the Mobile Connector came out looking like new:

View attachment 477486

View attachment 477487
Yes, that's a Mobile Connector under the snowpack happily charging away.

But dealing with the wet equipment was not ideal and Tesla had shipped us a free HPWC as part of the Referral Program. Since we already had one mounted at our house, I decided to install the new one by the driveway of our ski cabin. Even though it's rated to be installed out in the weather, everything in a rain forest eventually turns green. There is a lot of moss, lichen, needles and leaves that fall from the surrounding trees. Even water dripping off the trees has a green color to it. And we get a lot of rain, followed by snow and hard freezes. The charge cable would turn into a "snow/ice rope" which would be difficult to uncoil.

This fall, urged on by the chill in the air, I designed and built this little charging kiosk:

View attachment 477494
Almost finished. I just need to finish backfilling the trench and install a copper ridge cap to keep the moss and fungus from growing on the cedar shingles. Copper slowly leaches over the roof as it ages and acts as a fungicide. It probably won't be too long before the brightness goes away and develops a nice aged patina.

Because this structure is not heated it was important to make sure the cedar roof breathes properly because it will be wet most of the year. So the horizontal nailers are also rot-resistant cedar and I stapled some leftover roofing breather material to the face of them so the back sides of the shingles can breathe.

All the rocks at the base came out of the trench I dug with a pick-axe and shovel so you can imagine the trenching was not fast or easy!

All of the materials (including the 9' pressure treated 6 x 6) were discarded scraps from other projects except for:

Cedar Shingles (under $90)
SS (916) roofing nails (under $50)
Copper flashing for the ridge cap ($110 as I had to buy enough for 2 1/2 roofs)
Wood sealer ($22)
bag of concrete ($5)
#6 Electrical wire, 1" sch. 80 conduit, fittings, 60 A breaker, caution tape, PVC glue ($165 as I ran an extra #6 conductor in case someone ever wanted to convert it to a NEMA 14-50)

Total: Under $440 before sales tax (thanks to Elon for the signed HPWC!)

I took the copper sheet to a local small heating and air conditioning shop and asked the secretary if she knew anyone with a sheet metal brake so I could get the ridge cap formed into a "V". The young installer who happened to be in the office overheard my question and immediately offered to bend it on the spot. He brought it back out in about 4 minutes and told me there was no charge. I still need a 5" sheet metal tool to properly form the ends into nice drip edges. Photo with the ridge cap installed but without the ends finished:
View attachment 477495

Eventually, these rocks will be covered in moss and I'll be planting some native sword ferns around the sides and back. This is a welcome addition to EV ownership in the mountains and means I can defrost the car on winter ski mornings without watching the battery meter go backward! Now, bring on the snow, please!

That is amazing! Beautiful job!

I am curious what size ground wire you used? Code only requires a #10, but for a longer run I might have considered going up a size (but not required).
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
7,650
8,434
Riverside Co. CA
@StealthP3D that looks awesome! I really love the contrast between the "rustic" wood shingle look, with the "futuristic" EV wall connector under it. Kind of reminds me of people who save old gas pumps and use them as decorations etc for some reason.

it looks amazing now, and is going to look even more amazing once the roof gets some of that patina you were talking about on it. Fantastic fantastic! Thanks for sharing!
 
Last edited:

StealthP3D

Well-Known Member
Dec 12, 2018
8,735
64,348
Maple Falls, WA
Thanks to all of you who let me know you liked it!

Really well executed, lovely.
Can you please update pics in the next months, as nature moves in around your project would be very interesting to see any transformations.

I'll update with pictures as the copper develops a patina and stuff starts growing. But I don't expect any real growth until next summer since the weather is so cool and wet, the days are so short, and the light under the tree canopy is so minimal, at least until next summer.
 

StealthP3D

Well-Known Member
Dec 12, 2018
8,735
64,348
Maple Falls, WA
You could install a small light up in the peak of the roof to provide some path lighting. Just grab one leg and a neutral and you're off to the races. These lamps are super nice for that sort of thing.

That's a good idea and something I toyed with but I dropped it because I was under the impression it would be against code to have a 120V circuit on a 240V breaker? Also, I think it might be against code to have any other load on an EV charging circuit.

Also, this might sound weird, but I really love how dark it gets around here. People are pretty good about not ruining that with lights and I have a number of flashlights with "moonlight" mode so my night vision is not impacted. I actually like to take walks in the dark and only turn on the dim flashlight when necessary. I haven't tripped over anything yet! On a clear night the stars can be *amazing*.
 

eprosenx

Active Member
May 30, 2018
2,065
2,482
Beaverton, OR
That's a good idea and something I toyed with but I dropped it because I was under the impression it would be against code to have a 120V circuit on a 240V breaker? Also, I think it might be against code to have any other load on an EV charging circuit.

Also, this might sound weird, but I really love how dark it gets around here. People are pretty good about not ruining that with lights and I have a number of flashlights with "moonlight" mode so my night vision is not impacted. I actually like to take walks in the dark and only turn on the dim flashlight when necessary. I haven't tripped over anything yet! On a clear night the stars can be *amazing*.

Yeah, I don’t think code would have allowed this for a number of reasons. EV charging must be dedicated, a 60a circuit is too large, etc...

But you could have run additional conductors in the conduit if you really wanted.
 
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Reactions: StealthP3D

StealthP3D

Well-Known Member
Dec 12, 2018
8,735
64,348
Maple Falls, WA
I wanted to add that I was surprised how little the electrical components and conduit/fittings cost for this kind of pedestal install.

For those thinking of doing a pedestal without the roof, the cost of everything needed to run the HPWC at 48 A (minus the pedestal and HPWC) was only $165 for everything including the 35' of wire my job needed (I used 32'). Measure the run carefully and be a bit generous (you don't want to end up 6" too short).
 

kwag

Member
Jun 19, 2019
27
9
aloha
i maybe be scanning here to quickly, but 240 60amp should be run on 6 gauge not 8 gauge. 60amp breaker for a 48amp circuit. 8 gauge should be limited to 32amp output.
 

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