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P85 rear air spring module disassembly or exchange with newer version?

E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
Primary questions:
  1. Has anyone ever taken one of the earlier air springs (6006352/3-00) apart and replaced the internal seals?
  2. Can anyone confirm interchangeability between older and newer rear air spring modules?
Longer version:
On my 2014 Model S P85 with air suspension I have a slow leak that is likely coming out of the bottom of the right rear air spring bladder. I see evidence of the air leaking when spraying a soapy solution on the joint between the damper body and the rubber dust boot. Has anyone ever taken one of these air springs apart and replaced the internal seals? I was waiting for Suncore to get some rebuilt units in stock but they have been out of stock since June.

Alternatively, I'm looking at putting on a set of Arnott rear air springs that are listed for the AWD 2016-2018 model years. Is anyone familiar with the interchangeability between older and newer part numbers? Has anyone had the newer part numbers put on as part of a service on an older vehicle? I have a quote from a Tesla service center that indicates they plan to put on part numbers 6006352-07-B and 6006353-06-C if they confirmed that my air springs were indeed leaking. I believe my original parts were the 6006352-00 and 6006353-00, but I did not confirm when I was inspecting for leaks.

Thanks,
Joel
 

rooter

Member
May 13, 2018
732
904
Edmonds, WA
I feel your pain. I have a 2015 P85D with a 'unicorn' suspension -- that sporty + one they used for a while. Due to the accident the car was in before I bought it, I had to replace the driver's front air spring, like $700 in 2015.

And for the past year it's been leaking. I get the light on the dash and the pump is working hard much of the time. I've used soap bubbles on all the connections but nothing's leaking so it must be the air spring.

As these are filled with compressed nitrogen I have no hope that they can be rebuilt, and can only be replaced. Well replacing a worn out pump is cheaper than an air spring.

I got this air spring new through 'irregular channels' due to the way things were at the time, so no warranty.
 
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E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
Interesting, I wonder if it was different dampers but the air shock portion was the same. Do you have the part numbers for your replacement air springs? The fronts seem to have a similar seal design between the damper and bladder based on the unplugged performance shock installation instructions. The part I don’t know is if that O-ring is what seals the air shock on the bottom. And of course I can’t find any details about the o-ring size and material.

Joel
 

E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
I think you are correct. The descriptions I have seen for the "+" package indicate dampers, swaybars, and staggered tires. The sealing mechanism between the damper and the air spring should be the same though but I haven't seen anyone really take apart the fronts or the rears other than what is in the Unplugged high performance shock installation instructions. With that said, the "+" package is really listed as the P85+, not the P85D+, so I'm thinking the P85+ front dampers became the standard P85D front dampers, which eventually became the same dampers used on all the dual motor vehicles.

Joel
 

Alysashley79

Active Member
Oct 4, 2013
1,201
513
Seattle(ish) WA
I think you are correct. The descriptions I have seen for the "+" package indicate dampers, swaybars, and staggered tires. The sealing mechanism between the damper and the air spring should be the same though but I haven't seen anyone really take apart the fronts or the rears other than what is in the Unplugged high performance shock installation instructions. With that said, the "+" package is really listed as the P85+, not the P85D+, so I'm thinking the P85+ front dampers became the standard P85D front dampers, which eventually became the same dampers used on all the dual motor vehicles.

Joel

there’s something different between the p85+ and the p85D+. I’ve had both and have driven a straight p85D with the same wheel set up as mine and the handling is quite different between the 3. I don’t have staggered tires on mine just because Of where I live but otherwise it handles much much better.
 
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rooter

Member
May 13, 2018
732
904
Edmonds, WA
The stiffer + suspension carried over from the P85 to the P85D until about May, 2015. Shame they stopped it because it is great.

I disconnected my 12v battery for a week to determine which corner it is, and sure enough driver's front.
 

C0mputerGuy

New Member
Oct 15, 2020
1
1
Frederick, Co
Primary questions:
  1. Has anyone ever taken one of the earlier air springs (6006352/3-00) apart and replaced the internal seals?
  2. Can anyone confirm interchangeability between older and newer rear air spring modules?
Longer version:
On my 2014 Model S P85 with air suspension I have a slow leak that is likely coming out of the bottom of the right rear air spring bladder. I see evidence of the air leaking when spraying a soapy solution on the joint between the damper body and the rubber dust boot. Has anyone ever taken one of these air springs apart and replaced the internal seals? I was waiting for Suncore to get some rebuilt units in stock but they have been out of stock since June.

Alternatively, I'm looking at putting on a set of Arnott rear air springs that are listed for the AWD 2016-2018 model years. Is anyone familiar with the interchangeability between older and newer part numbers? Has anyone had the newer part numbers put on as part of a service on an older vehicle? I have a quote from a Tesla service center that indicates they plan to put on part numbers 6006352-07-B and 6006353-06-C if they confirmed that my air springs were indeed leaking. I believe my original parts were the 6006352-00 and 6006353-00, but I did not confirm when I was inspecting for leaks.

Thanks,
Joel
I have been looking at the parts as mine are also leaking my 2018 Model S P85D.
The 6006352-07-B has a few more letters after it - DM SS... I believe those stand for Dual Motor Sport Suspension. I am going to order the same part for my vehicle. The 6006352-06-C DM - I believe is just dual motor. And there are some others for an S2 and an S3. I suppose the SS could mean Signature Series. I have asked the Tesla parts department for clarification.

https://epc.tesla.com/#/catalogs - Great site and you are able to sign in with your Tesla ID.
 
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E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
I have been looking at the parts as mine are also leaking my 2018 Model S P85D.
The 6006352-07-B has a few more letters after it - DM SS... I believe those stand for Dual Motor Sport Suspension. I am going to order the same part for my vehicle. The 6006352-06-C DM - I believe is just dual motor. And there are some others for an S2 and an S3. I suppose the SS could mean Signature Series. I have asked the Tesla parts department for clarification.

https://epc.tesla.com/#/catalogs - Great site and you are able to sign in with your Tesla ID.

I agree with your interpretations of the DM and SS nomenclature, the only thing that threw me off on the EPC was the PERF PLUS option, since they only list a right hand part number. I emailed the local parts desk and never got a response about replacement air springs. I have a quote from their service department for new rear springs, but for whatever reason they are quoting a 6006352-07-B and 6006353-06-C, which is a bit concerning. I have been putting off having them replacement (for various reasons). As for the S3 and S2, I decided that would have something to do with signature or series 1/2/3.

I have since my original post bought a used 6006353-00-C and working on disassembling it. My theory is there is a bottom o-ring that is leaking and it can be [easily] replaced. I have to modify a 1 5/8" impact socket to remove the top cap of the spring assembly. Then I can get at the o-ring and see if it's a standard size and material. I'm pretty sure this o-ring would be the same for all the pre-facelift car suspensions, but I'm not sure if they changed the shock absorber dimensions when they did the face lift. Do you know what part number your spring assemblies are? Do you have the adaptive suspension?

Joel
Bottom Seasl.JPG
Shock assembly.JPG
Top Cap.JPG
 
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E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
Interesting, based on my research that shock belongs to 6006352-07 and 6006353-07. It would be interesting to know if the P85+ had the 6006352-06 suspension.
 

E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
And just in case anyone is wondering, the air spring has two o-ring seals. Disassembly requires a custom tool to take off the top cap and the same specific tools to remove a top strut nut. Other than that it came apart relatively easily and the two o-rings can be replaced. The photos below are from a air spring that I purchased from Ebay so that I didn't have my car out of commission while figuring out the tools and O-ring sizes. This weekend I replaced the O-rings on the right rear spring from my car and so far it seems to not be sagging after 24 hours, so I'm hoping that this is all it takes.

Joel

1 Shock.jpg
2 Top Cap Removal.jpg
3 Shock nut removal.jpg
4 Removed shock.jpg
5 Lower O-Ring bore.jpg
6 Lower O-Ring and bottom spacer.jpg
 

E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
The o-rings turned out to be metric based on all the measurements and are standard round cross sections. The bottom looks weird because of the circlip mount on the shock body and the square spacer. I ended up getting Buna-N from McMaster-Carr. The bottom size was available in multiple materials, but the top was only available in Buna-N, which seemed like a good choice based on temp range and chemical compatibility. I had to buy packages of each, so if you are interested I can send some to you.

The top o-ring was 63mm ID, 2mm wide (dia) - PN 1302N057
The bottom o-ring was 50mm ID, 5mm wide (dia) - PN 9262K842

I'll find my notes and add all the measurements to this post for future reference. The lower o-ring seal design is definitely not per the Parker design guidelines and not surprising where it fails. The pictures below are from the unit removed from my car and it was dry but didn't have any obvious defects. So far the car is still holding its ride height after 36 hours, which it would usually start showing a little droop.

Joel

A. lower o-ring.JPG
B. pulling out the shock.JPG
C. shock with circlip spacer and o-ring.JPG
 
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E30M3

Member
Sep 5, 2020
15
11
Santa Clarita
And for reference, here are the measurements from the various components for the rear shocks. I do not know if they are the same for the fronts. Please note these are from a 6006353-00-C air spring assembly.
Bottom Seal
Shock body OD: 50 mm
Sleeve ID: 57.5 mm
O-Ring diameter: 5 mm
Therefore the O-ring is a 50 mm ID and 5 mm width

Top Seal
Gland OD: 63 mm
Bore ID: 66 mm
O-Ring diamater: 2 mm
Therefore the O-ring is a 63 mm and 2 mm width

I am also willing to sell sets of the o-rings I have for $10 shipped, that will include 2 lowers and 2 uppers shipped by USPS in a nice envelope to protect from damage.

The specific tools required. These are specific to the disassembly of the spring, not actually getting it out of the car.
  • Modified impact socket - needs to have six notches cut. I started with a 1 5/8 inch impact socket and had to trim the outside diameter. I also didn't do a very good job cutting it with my angle grinder, but ultimately it worked. If I was to do it again, I would try the 1 1/4 inch impact socket but there is the risk that you would have to widen out the inner diameter. The second picture below has the socket behind the spring.
  • 16mm spark plug socket - Sunex 884504 from Amazon is one option
  • 5mm long Hex bit - Capri tools from Amazon is one option
  • Alternatively, you could buy a 16mm strut nut socket and use a L-shaped allen key. But the leadtime on these was longer. Schwaben makes one.
Other tools that were not specifically purchased for this job included a half inch breaker bar, anti-rotation bar to hold the spring from rotating and o-ring lube for installation, a 2x4 with a hammer to push up the sleeve over the bottom o-ring, and a torque wrench for tightening everything back up. The top mounting plate does not need to be removed to get out the top seal. The top foam can be slowly pealed off leaving the adhesive backing intact.

Joel

D. Top Cap.JPG
E. Air fitting and Socket.JPG
 
Last edited:
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