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Paint Protection and Cleaning

Discussion in 'Model X: Interior & Exterior' started by Austin, Jun 19, 2016.

  1. Austin

    Austin Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2016
    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I've done a lot of searching, and have found a lot of different opinions on the subject of protecting the paint from rock chips, cleaning your car, etc... However, I've yet to be able to really see a definitive answer for this.

    So we all want to keep our beautiful Tesla free of rock chips, make cleaning fast; as to avoid water spotting and surface scratching from cleaning, and make it shine like the day we picked it up and brought it home. There are many different products to help us accomplish this, however, some of these products and services can cost $2,000+. Some of you are fortunate enough to be able to use the "money is no object" approach to caring for your Tesla, and I commend you for that. I am one of those people that believes and tries to live by the "Diminishing Rate of Return" principle. This most likely includes performing most of the services myself, which I have no problem with, just so long as the service doesn't involve a particular skill set that exceeds what I'm capable of.

    Keeping the "Diminishing Rate of Return" principle in mind, what are the best products and/or services (along with their costs) to apply to my Tesla that allows me to:

    - Protection from all rock chips
    - Being able to quickly wash my Tesla and have it practically dry itself without showing any water-spots
    - Eliminating spider scratches in the clear coat (I have a Solid Black Tesla, so this can show easier than most other paints)

    Again, I'm not asking just for "what do you do?", unless what you do uses the DRR principle. It would also help if you can provide links to these products/services.

    Thank you.
     
  2. ccutrer

    ccutrer Member

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    Location:
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    I'm definitely not in the money is no object crowd, but I am in the crowd that can stretch to afford things when I value it enough.

    I'm going to get a full wrap on my X, but I did a lot of shopping around to get a decent price. The most recommended/highest end shop in my area quoted me a price that was simply out of my range. It still gives me heartburn even with the price I'm getting at another shop, but looking at the condition that my 7 year old black Chrysler Aspen is in on the exterior, I'm confident that it will be worth it to me in the long run. With four kids, I simply don't have the time to be babying the exterior of my car with proper hand washes on a regular basis. And with the cost of an X, I'm really hoping for it to last a long time - possibly a decade or more. It'd sure be great if I can keep it looking decent for that long, with minimal investment of time and money in the interim.
     
  3. Austin

    Austin Member

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    Mar 31, 2016
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    Austin, TX
    Ccutrer, I'm guessing that full wrap is going to run you $1,500+. If that is the case, then I would consider that to be above and beyond what I'm looking to do. I know there are DIY products out that are fairly inexpensive $50-$80 that can be applied once every 1-2 years that will make keeping the Tesla clean a breeze. I'm looking for the right one. Beyond that, rock protection is also I want to do, but I'm looking for the best way to go without breaking the bank. I've personally done plasti-dip in the past, which is very inexpensive, and it works. However, I don't care for the finish. A wrap does look better. However, both the wrap and Plasti-Dip, eventually has to be changed, as they both start to wear. To do the front end of the X in Plasti-Dip yourself, would only run about $50. To wrap the front of the X, I'm guessing about $800-$1000 (this would include the bumper, hood and mirrors). Although I don't care for the finish of the Plasti-Dip as much, this is where DRR comes into play. DRR dictates that Plasti-Dip is the way to go. I would then just peel off and re-apply the section that received any major impact from a rock to keep proper coverage and to maintain the best look. Plasti-Dip does sell a clear spray, so even though it would look dull where it was applied, at least the car would be protected.

    However, I am still waiting to hear from anyone who has a better solution.
     
  4. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    Austin, TX
  5. Austin

    Austin Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Thanks. I'll definitely contact him to get a quote.
     

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