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Parkworld 886115 Combiner, Household (2) 5-15 Plug Male to Generator Twist Lock L14-30 Receptacle

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,407
11,750
Riverside Co. CA
Hi all, I'm curious to know what you think about using this adapter to plug into two separate phase 5-15 outlets to charge my M3. Will I get 22 m/h charge if I purchase the 14-30 adapter from Tesla? I'm just uncertain if it will combine both 15A circuits to 30A.

https://www.amazon.com/Parkworld-Combiner-Household-Generator-Receptacle/dp/B0811NMTFD

You dont want to use something like that at all, imo. most outlets close to each other would be on the same circuit. No, you wont get 22 miles hour charge using that.
 

TheRFMan

Member
Dec 15, 2019
554
422
Ottawa, Canada
I would not recommend that at all. I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be UL listed, and it presents an electrical hazard. There should never be a 30A outlet on there. Assuming that this type device is OK to use in your locality, the outlet should be a NEMA 6-15, not a 14-30. Having a 14-30 on there would allow connecting a device drawing up to 30A to it. In the best case, that would trip both breakers. In the worst case, the breakers malfunction and the wiring heats up dangerously and becomes a fire hazard.

This one at least has the right type of outlet on in: Quick 220 Systems: Model A220-15D For Equipment with US/Canadian Plugs

Also note that this type of device cannot be used with GFI outlets. There is no current returning through the neutral lines of the outlets, which will immediately trip a GFI.

I'm not sure if it's unique to Canada, but it's fairly common here to see "split" outlets, especially in kitchens of homes built in the 80s (I often see them referred as kitchen splits). For those, a 3-conductor+ground is run to the outlet rather than a 2 conductor+ground. Each receptacle is on one phase, and the neutral is shared. In the panel, it uses a 2-slot joined breaker like a standard 240V circuit. this allows for two appliances (like a toaster and microwave) to be connected without tripping breakers. (Kitchen Split Receptacle Circuits : Electrical Online). If you have one of those somewhere, you could easily connect that device to both outlets and get 240V. Then again, you could also replace the entire wall outlet with a 6-15 (since the wiring for 240V is already there) and have a few dollars.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,954
Boise, ID
Wow, that's a weird one and not what I was expecting. Some of you were thinking the same thing I was--that this is like the Quick220, trying to use the two phases of 120V to make 240V, but that is not quite what this is.
I read through the product description, and it's using two 5-15 outlets to combine their current output into an L5-30, which is still a 120V outlet type, but 30A. So I think this cable is tying together the two hots as one side, and the two neutrals as the other side instead of trying to span the two in series to double the voltage. So really, this might even work on GFCI outlets, because it is still passing current back out through the neutrals too. And since you're not trying to get double voltage, they wouldn't even have to be on opposite phases--just need to be a separate circuit, so you could get current from both.

So, um, I have not heard of someone trying one of these, but I would be kind of hesitant to.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,407
11,750
Riverside Co. CA
Wow, that's a weird one and not what I was expecting. Some of you were thinking the same thing I was--that this is like the Quick220, trying to use the two phases of 120V to make 240V, but that is not quite what this is.
I read through the product description, and it's using two 5-15 outlets to combine their current output into an L5-30, which is still a 120V outlet type, but 30A. So I think this cable is tying together the two hots as one side, and the two neutrals as the other side instead of trying to span the two in series to double the voltage. So really, this might even work on GFCI outlets, because it is still passing current back out through the neutrals too. And since you're not trying to get double voltage, they wouldn't even have to be on opposite phases--just need to be a separate circuit, so you could get current from both.

So, um, I have not heard of someone trying one of these, but I would be kind of hesitant to.

Yeah I read it as you mentioned in your opening statement. Thanks for the clarification.
 

TheRFMan

Member
Dec 15, 2019
554
422
Ottawa, Canada
You're totally right. I completely missed that, also thought this was like the quick220. I guess it could work, but rather weird for sure. Does the UMC even have a 30A 120V adapter available? I guess the closes available would be a TT-30 from a 3rd party?
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,954
Boise, ID
You're totally right. I completely missed that, also thought this was like the quick220. I guess it could work, but rather weird for sure. Does the UMC even have a 30A 120V adapter available? I guess the closes available would be a TT-30 from a 3rd party?
Well, this is something that is pretty cool about the Tesla charging equipment. The adapters and charging cable don't actually care whether the input is 120V or 240V. It just needs to see a voltage difference across those two pins, and it will detect and use whatever is there (within some boundaries, of course). So technically a 14-30 adapter plug could be fine if you used some kind of pigtail thing to fit it into that L5-30 receptacle with the right wire-to-wire connections.

But, I never really got to giving an answer about using this. And here's why I wouldn't:

The charging cable side would handle it, but it's a danger for the house wiring. With the situation of the Quick220, you know it's limiting the current evenly on both outlets, because it's using them as one single circuit--both sides have to match as one complete loop. But with this one, you are hooking them in parallel, so it's going to be like "either/or/both" about where the current is going to come from between those two different circuits. When the car tries to draw 24A, there is nothing to enforce an even 12/12 split between the circuits. It's going to be "path of least resistance" for whichever circuit it can get current from easier. So this may end up splitting like 14A and 10A between the two, and that might trip the breaker on that higher side after a while when it heats up.

So this is a sketchy and dangerous kind of use that I would not recommend.

It was an interesting one to think through, though.
 

user212_nr

Active Member
Aug 26, 2019
1,407
748
US
Will I get 22 m/h charge if I purchase the 14-30 adapter from Tesla?

As others have mentioned, this is the 5-15L and not the 14-30.

I think the use case for this device is to hook up a generator to the 5-15L via an extension cord, and use extension cords to plug the plugs into extension cords and into household sockets, backfeeding the home.

It is definitely NOT for use for EVs, and the reason its use isn't listed is because it has no "proper" use case.
 
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