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Performance Tires & Ultra-High Performance Tires - Consumer's Reports April 2015

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by ArtInCT, Mar 1, 2015.

  1. ArtInCT

    ArtInCT Always Learning

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    #1 ArtInCT, Mar 1, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
    Was just thumbing through my most recent copy of Consumers Reports, the April 2015 Automobile Issue.

    On page 18 CR reports their Best Tires in 7 Categories.

    Two and possibly three of their categories apply to the Model S.
    I also wonder just how and if the CR best rated are appropriate to the Model S.
    In other words, is there a tire fitment for the 19" and 21" wheels with the appropriate weight specification?
    You can do the leg work on that so here is a summary on their best tires....

    Performance All-Season Tires and Ultra-High-Performance Tires.

    CR breaks Performance All-Season Tires into two sub-strata...

    H speed rating 130 MPH and V speed rating 149 MPH

    H Speed Rating

    Michelin Primacy MXV4
    Continental PureContact

    V Speed Rating

    Continental PureContact
    Michelin Primacy MXV4

    Ultra-High-Performance Tires

    Here this entire group is rated for at least 149 MPH speed rating however the group is broken into two subgroups, UHP All-Season Tires and UHP Summer Tires
    It is very likely that UHP Summer Tires will have a compound and or tread design that is not suitable for cold weather driving (snow, ice)

    UHP ALL-SEASON TIRES

    Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3
    Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric All Season
    Hankook Ventus S1 noble 2
    Pirelli P Zero Nero All Season
    Cooper Zeon RS3-A

    UHP SUMMER TIRES

    Pirelli P Zero
    Michelin Pilot Super Sport
    Yokahama Advan Sport V105
    Nokian zLine
    Continental Extreme Contact DW

    From what I know about tires, there are some tires which create (to me) less road noise. This may be a very important factor in a EV.

    Also, some tires wear out more quickly than others, and from what I have seen this is a function of compound & grip factors being turned up at the expense of longevity and tread wear. Additionally, some tires are rated as "Low Rolling Resistance" tires, which may have a factor for EV use, perhaps at the expense of grip.

    Lastly, there is a payload weight factor that we all should be aware of... not all tires are rated to carry the same weight per tire. The model S is not a lightweight vehicle.

    Many of the online tire store websites allow you to compare various aspects of tires, including warranty.

    Have any of you used any of the above tires models on the Model S?
    What have been your observations and use experiences?
    One other thing I can tell you I personally have been very guilty of, I have been known to choose a tire BECAUSE I preferred
    the clean and easy to keep clean sidewall design vs a tire that sports a very complex sidewall design. Those busy sidewalls
    are not fun to keep clean and are hard to make presentable over time... may be alone here.

    A good stove-side topic for the winter... we are expecting 4-7" of new powder here in Connecticut today...

    Cheers, Art
     
  2. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    I don't know about the others, but the Primacy is LRR (low rolling resistance). Tires that are not LRR will result in lower range and higher Wh/mi consumption due to added friction.
     
  3. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    1. I'm not a fan of CR. They often get it wrong or miss the point--even if they did get it right about the Model S. After all no one is wrong 100% of the time (even your least favourite politician). CR is generally good for items like vacuum cleaners and is often the only source for reviews.

    2. I've used the Goodyear OE tires, Michelin Primacy, and Nokian WR-3G (a severe service all-season). I got rid of the Goodyears quickly, the WR-3G tires are for winter but they won't die on a 30C day the way actual snow tires do. If I lived in Connecticut, I'd get the R2 or X-Ice I3 rather than the WR-3G. So far there doesn't seem to be a great deal of difference in RR between the Primacy and the WR-G3.

    3. Every tire has a load capacity index; it's easy to see on the sidewall what this is. Saying that some tires don't have the same carrying capacity is kind of a red herring because as far as I know the lowest load index supplied on a Model S is 98. The lowest load index shown for any 195/45R19 tire on TireRack is 98 (many are over 100). The load on the tire is carried by the air, except for a small casing factor (which you can ignore unless you're a tire design engineer). When making a tire of a certain size the carrying capacity is determined by the volume of air in a tire at any given pressure. This results in any tire of a certain size will have at least X carrying capacity because if you make a tire a certain size, the casing ply cords will automatically support a certain pressure and may have more if additional pressure is designed for (by using slightly stronger casing ply cords).

    4. I've never worried about keeping the sidewalls of a blackwall tire particularly clean. Depending upon what you use to clean it with, it may do more harm than good.

    5. LRR is one of the things that tire manufacturers consider a trade secret so, other than actually using each kind, there's no way to tell because some maker's LRR tires have higher rolling resistance than other maker's non-LRR tires. This becomes even more confusion because the same manufacturer might use a different tires as a baselines for comparison. (e.g. The performance LRR tire may be compared to a performance non-LRR tire rather than having a single baseline for all tires). The little information that's published isn't of much use either because it's always outdated and manufacturers make undocumented modifications fairly frequently.
     
  4. ArtInCT

    ArtInCT Always Learning

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    Jerry33:
    I was not aware that LRR was not a standard but rather a brand by brand marketing claim. Nice to know.

    Is the load rating index also the same therefore trivialized in the 21" tire fitments?

    Thanks for those bit of information!

    Do you happen to know the history of the various Tesla OEM brands and models of tires that they supplied with the Model S? I do not have that data in the WIKI...
     
  5. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    A given load index applies to any tire it is put on, so a tire with a load index of 98 will carry a maximum of 1653 lbs regardless of tire size. Here is a chart.
     

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