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PG&E E-9 rate, documentation needed to sign up?

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by GasDoc, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. GasDoc

    GasDoc Member

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    SF Bay Area
    What documentation is required to sign up for the E-9 rate?

    Does the vehicle have to be registered at the address?

    I'd like to set up this rate at my weekday and weekend home; will this be a problem?

    Obviously, the car will only have one address on the registration.
     
  2. Zextraterrestrial

    Joined:
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    I that rate really any better? I looked at it barely last year in march when I switched to TOU (e-6?)
    It seemed like the TOU might be cheaper. I though there was like a 15$/month base charge + the rates weren't that good on the E-9 but I'll look again when the time is up for the mando 1 year period after changing.

    sorry, doesn't help your question ;>
     
  3. GasDoc

    GasDoc Member

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    I discovered during my research that I'm not even on Time of Use, just straight tiered (and it's costing me a fortune!).

    Since I can only change once per year, I have to decide between TOU and E-9.
     
  4. Zextraterrestrial

    Joined:
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    take a look at the summer power #'s and winter when u check. Our summer is crazy expensive. I don't use my oven before 9:00 in summer for the TOU - which means we use the gas cooktop or BBQ ;>

    It seemed to me that PG&E is trying pretty hard to screw you a little one way or another and you need to be careful w/ when you will be drawing power. If I remember, it seemed the hours I'd charge were cheaper than if I had the EV tier/separate meter no matter when I charged
     
  5. rcc

    rcc Model S 85KW, VIN #2236

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    I'm getting solar power put on the roof and I still may not switch to a TOU plan. The problem is if you have kids at home during part or all of the day.

    I think the TOU plans make sense if everyone works and you can plan on lighter A/C use during the day and doing laundry and dishes at night during the non-winter months. But note that peak time in winter is evenings when everyone has their lights on :).

    But if some of the family is at home during a good part of the day, the A/C, dishwasher and laundry will be running during the day. If that's the case, staying on the standard residential rate may make more sense.
     
  6. Zextraterrestrial

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    agreed! we have no kids and I made a time table showing the $ cost extra for each hour of the day if you use power. She doesn't run the washer, dryer, or oven before 9:00 or late in the morning. It made a pretty big difference for summer this year

    Peak time in the winter is barely more than off-peak $.03 (around $.30) I think and peak is only a few hours (5-8) in the winter. I'm not too worried about winter power but try to use around the peak still.
    Summer it is $0.18 more during peak for every tier
     
  7. strider

    strider Active Member

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    Well, note that GasDoc is in San Francisco so likely no A/C. I'm in the same boat (though a bit further south). With no A/C you aren't hit as hard by the $0.33/kWh in the summer and the cheap night rates are a huge benefit if you have an EV. In my case, during the workday the only thing that runs at our house is the fridge, TiVo, and cable modem. We're about to have 2 EVs so having cheap off-peak rates are crucial but it's an individual decision. You have to run the numbers for your situation.

    But to answer GasDoc's question, going from memory, I think all PG&E wants to know is what make and model of EV you have and what rate you plan to charge - what amperage @ 240V (they need to make sure your local transformer can handle the load). I don't recall having to "prove" my EV lived at a particular address.
     
  8. Kipernicus

    Kipernicus Model S Res#P1440

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    I was able to call and switch to E9A without any issues and they didn't need proof I was buying an EV.

    If you are installing a 14-50 or other EVSE they have a survey for you to fill out so they make sure the transformer is able to handle the load, but because I said I was charging off of regular 110 (I plan to use the free charging at work, but that's another thread) they didn't even need me to do the form.

    I should have switched my rate plan a long time ago because by my calcs (and you can download your hourly usage info for the past year from the PG&E website, look for a "developers" link) it is cheaper than the standard rates for my usage.
     
  9. GasDoc

    GasDoc Member

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    Hmmm....my profile should say San Francisco Peninsula but it cut off; I've edited.

    Thanks for all the good info. I'm on the Peninsula, so no AC. I can try to push high power consuming stuff like the pool pump and dishwasher to the nights. 3 kids at home so it's a bit tough to limit consumption.

    Have also been looking into Solar City. Their proposal is no money down and I wind up saving a little over $100/month from my current PG&E dependency.

    Looks like it might be a good deal.
     

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