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Please explain Stability Control

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by Al Sherman, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. Al Sherman

    Al Sherman It's about THIS car.

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    What is Stability Control? How does it work? What does it physically do on the Model S?
     
  2. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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  3. Al Sherman

    Al Sherman It's about THIS car.

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    Is it any different in the Model S?
     
  4. yobigd20

    yobigd20 Well-Known Member

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  5. Theshadows

    Theshadows Active Member

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    I would say yes. It seems a lot more responsive and better at managing the attitude of the car than the ones I have experienced in VW's and Bimmers. Tesla says this is because there is a lot less inertia in the drive train to fight.

    I don't have stability control experience with any other makes so I can't compare them. I had heard last year or the year before that BMW had the most advanced system in the world but I never vetted the article I read.
     
  6. vgrinshpun

    vgrinshpun Active Member

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    #6 vgrinshpun, Dec 11, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
    These two patents do not apply to Model S as they describe methods for an electrical car that has more than one motor. Model S has only one electrical motor.

    - - - Updated - - -

    The stability control system is designed to keep car on the trajectory defined by the position of the steering wheel and conventionally relies on ABS system to brake a single wheel to match car's trajectory to the path defined by the position of the steering wheel. Since Model S has one motor directly coupled to the rear wheels, its stability control system has to be conventional, i.e. rely on the application of hydraulic brakes to an individual wheel.

    The advantages of electric drive in Model S are evident in superior traction control, rather than stability control. The role of traction control is to keep driving torque at the threshold of the traction afforded by the tires. There are two advantages of the electric drivetrain in Model S: much faster and more precise control of the power into the motor via power electronics module (PEM) as compared with fuel delivery system in any ICE car, as well as lower inertia of the mechancial system that connects shaft of the motor to the wheels.

    Generally speaking, in order to take full advantage of the electric drive and have vastly superior stability system each individual wheel need to be connected to a dedicated electric motor. There is a mesmerizing video of Chris Harris testing Mercedes Benz SLS AMG Electric, which clearly demonstrates this - this is profound, must see (make sure to watch the entire 18 min video)!

    Mercedes SLS Electric Drive. Can Volts Ever Match Pistons? - /CHRIS HARRIS ON CARS - YouTube
     

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