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Please help contributing to this battery survey

David99

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,909
7,353
Nomad (mostly US)
By far the most comprehensive battery survey for the Model S. Lots of entries from Europe, but there needs to be more data from cars with lots of miles. There is only 60 entries from the US but I know there are many Model S here with lots of miles. Please take a few minutes and add your car here

Tesla Battery Survey (old name MaxRange) - Google Sheets
 

bonnie

I play a nice person on twitter.
Feb 6, 2011
16,429
9,935
Columbia River Gorge
Is this different from the comprehensive PlugIn America surveys? Plug In America

I only see a simple grid layout on the PlugIn America site with basic info?
Does the site also include analysis and graphs like the Google sheet does?
I highly recommend checking out the Stats and Graphs TABs in the sheet:

Mileage vs Remaning Range.jpg
 

David99

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,909
7,353
Nomad (mostly US)
I just discovered I am way below average on capacity after 35,000 miles. I am at 75-80% left. This spreadsheet is invaluable for me to prove something is wrong with my car!

Thanks,
Dave

Yes it's a great tool to see where you are compared to the average and in general, where the trend is. One thing I found very interesting is the stats about people charging to different levels. There is a table correlating charge level to where their range is compared to the average. It shows that those charging to 90% are mostly above average. The lower your daily charge level is the lower their average is. Kind of contradicts the notion of keeping the battery happy by charging it to a lower level.
Clearly there isn't enough data to make bold statements, but that's exactly why we need many more people to contribute.
dailyLevel.JPG
 
Yes it's a great tool to see where you are compared to the average and in general, where the trend is. One thing I found very interesting is the stats about people charging to different levels. There is a table correlating charge level to where their range is compared to the average. It shows that those charging to 90% are mostly above average. The lower your daily charge level is the lower their average is. Kind of contradicts the notion of keeping the battery happy by charging it to a lower level.
Clearly there isn't enough data to make bold statements, but that's exactly why we need many more people to contribute.

Exactly, I'm one of those that only charges to a max of 70% daily and if you look up jpet in the chart, you will see that I'm significantly below average. What the car gives us is only a calculated / estimated range. This can be significantly different from the chemical range, which can only be measured by doing at least one full 100% -> 0% -> 100% cycle. If we keep on adding data to this sheet, in a few years we will have an excellent statistical reference. Personally, my goal is to achieve a very high cycle count and that's why I'm trying not to stress the battery if I don't need the range.
 
Added our 2013 Tesla Model S 85 with 70000 km today. We don't do anything particularly special, just charge 90% daily and drive. If/when we need to range charge, we do. If/when we need to drive down to 10% we do. Most of the week, it's a garage queen, but it gets a workout every weekend. My wife just wondered out loud what we're going to do when we've put another 50000 km on the car, and I showed her the chart/estimates, and the trend looked good to us, especially as more fast charging points become available.

- - - Updated - - -

I'm trying not to stress the battery if I don't need the range.

We're leaving the work to manage the battery to the Tesla software. We have a three year old bought on CPO without autopilot. An upgrade to newer tech is a more likely scenario for us than driving the car to 200000 km ...
 

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
12,020
7,804
Yes it's a great tool to see where you are compared to the average and in general, where the trend is. One thing I found very interesting is the stats about people charging to different levels. There is a table correlating charge level to where their range is compared to the average. It shows that those charging to 90% are mostly above average. The lower your daily charge level is the lower their average is. Kind of contradicts the notion of keeping the battery happy by charging it to a lower level.
Clearly there isn't enough data to make bold statements, but that's exactly why we need many more people to contribute.
It may be true that charging at higher SOC gives you better displayed range (normalized to 100% equivalent) because of battery balancing and capacity calibration. However, that may not necessarily be true of actual range. As jpet says, if a full cycle was done, the displayed 100% range may go up drastically for cars typically charging at lower SOC. This has happened in many cases.
 

David99

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jan 31, 2014
4,909
7,353
Nomad (mostly US)
It may be true that charging at higher SOC gives you better displayed range (normalized to 100% equivalent) because of battery balancing and capacity calibration. However, that may not necessarily be true of actual range. As jpet says, if a full cycle was done, the displayed 100% range may go up drastically for cars typically charging at lower SOC. This has happened in many cases.

That are my thoughts, too. The less you charge, the shallower the cycles for the battery. Based on all info that is good for the longevity of the battery, but makes it harder to measure the exact capacity. I'm sure Tesla will be on the lower/safer side when estimating range thus those people end up below the average.
 

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