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Pollution by brake pads

Discussion in 'Energy, Environment, and Policy' started by Mitrovic, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. Mitrovic

    Mitrovic Member

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    I heard about reports that 20 % of the pollution by ICE cars is caused by brake pads!
    Does anybody know more?
    Is there any report how positive EV are at this topic?

    Thank you!
     
  2. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    That seems... "unlikely".
     
  3. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    The original article on argus.fr makes clear that about 20% of the particulate pollution from a car are from the brakes. Particulates are only one of the pollutants from cars, of course.

    The good news is that we use brakes much, much less in the Model S, so not only do we have zero tail-pipe emissions, but also a much lower rate of brake-pad particulate pollution.
     
  4. Mitrovic

    Mitrovic Member

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    That is correct Robert.

    So does anybody know of any study / statistic analyzing this?
     
  5. Raffy.Roma

    Raffy.Roma Active Member

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    Agree. In fact EVs have to change their pads much less with respect to ICE cars. Less pollution and less expenses for people having EVs.

    Not only this. I read that in Italy a lady driving the Model S down the Dolomites managed to get 50 kilometers of charge by using regen brakes. Using regen brakes is really convenient!
     
  6. liuping

    liuping Active Member

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    In theory, the Model S should generate less brake dust due to regenerative braking.

    In practice, at least subjectively based on the amount a dust I have to clean off the wheel each week when I wash it, my Model S generates more brake dust than any other car I've ever owned.
     
  7. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    #8 ecarfan, Aug 25, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2014
    @liuping: that is not my experience. My wife's used to own a Prius that had regenerative braking but not to the extent the model S has. After 6 years and 70K miles her Prius still had 65% of the original brake pad left on the front and even more on the rear pads. I expect the model S to have even less wear.

    I find my Model S wheels stay very clean compared to my Porsche.
     
  8. Mookuh

    Mookuh Member

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    The Model S is (presumeably) much heavier than the Prius, which translates into more wear on the brakepads. That and the S is a much stronger performing car which might be driven somewhat harder than a Prius. This is an assumption, of course, but could definately be influencing factors for the "average breakpad wear"-comparison. But I think it's safe to assume a Model S will use break pads at a slower rate than another car of compareable performance and weight.
     
  9. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    The is trying to imply that brake pad dust is the major cause of these deaths. The really big offender on this front is diesel engines. By a large factor.
     
  10. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    Odd... my experience has been the opposite. But then again, I really prefer one-foot driving, and I've gotten pretty adept at allowing myself sufficient regen-stopping distance under most circumstances... which also happens to be a safety buffer I like.
     
  11. ggr

    ggr Roadster R80 537, SigS P85 29

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    Maybe your other cars didn't have the same performance? Or used different, low-wear, pads? Certainly my Model S produces MUCH less brake dust than my old Merc or STi ever did.
     
  12. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    I think this article is trying to call into question the assumption that it's Diesel engines that are the primary problem. Well, they're still the *primary* problem, but the brake pads contribute a significant portion, and the brakes are unique in throwing off copper, which the authors seems to feel cause extra problems.
     
  13. omarsultan

    omarsultan Active Member

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    I think there is a leap in there somewhere that the brake and tire particulates are fine enough to remain airborne for any appreciable amount of time. The Tree Hugger article acknowledges "aerodynamic diameters of these non-exhaust particulate emissions tend to be larger than those of exhaust emissions" and implies a link without backing it up, while the second article above discusses pollution from run-off which makes total sense.
     

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