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Portable SuperChargers

Discussion in 'North America -' started by wabbit, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. wabbit

    wabbit Member

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    Indianapolis, IN
    After reading various threads about the progress of SuperChargers in the US I thought there might be a solution using temporary portable units that could be built on an assembly line and transported on semi trailers to a destination in NA.

    After reading some more posts I discovered that Tesla has already built a few for a few locations. It seems to me that many more locations could benefit by having two or four bays that were basically self contained and quickly installed.

    I would think that the bulk of the engineering has already been done and manufacture and assembly could be feasible (possibly utilizing some of the unused factory floor space) in the existing Fremont facility.

    I am not an engineer or electrician but I wonder just how long it would take to get this started (90 - 120 days?) and how long would the actual assembly take from assembly start to finished unit on its pallet, ready to ship.

    Would it be reasonable to expect two or three days from parts bin to out the door? At that rate how long before a thousand units could be in the field. Say 100 units a month. 1000 units built and installed in a year?

    If no local construction were required except erecting a conduit mast that would allow a service drop from an already existing mall substation, a unit could be operational a few days after a permit was issued. I don't have any idea about the power requirements of large malls but a pair of SuperChargers would not be much of an additional load, I would think.

    Rollout could occur at a much faster rate and operational (temporarily) until a permanent installation was constructed. These could also serve less population dense locations, and with usage monitored via connection to the internet it would be a way to determine the best distribution of SuperChargers as demand increased (or didn't).

    I am puzzled why the first cross country SC chain was not direct from LA to NYC (via interstates 15/40/44/70/78. I am sure it is on the way but I scratched my head at the route through Wyoming and North Dakota in the winter.

    I also think Tesla is missing an opportunity to inform more potential customers by using a kiosk video player as part of every SuperCharger location.

    So what do you think? An idea with merit or too much time spent dreaming of a second generation Roadster (R2) in the garage?
     
  2. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    The typical delay is in the permit process. Using a portable Supercharger to run around the regulations isn't likely to endear you to city council when you go back and ask for a permanent site. Also it needs to be powered, so you would either have to run a line (requiring a permit) or use a noisy generator which the property owner isn't going to like much.

    My understanding is that the temporary SCs were for a special event and only used for a day or two (at least in most cases).
     
  3. wabbit

    wabbit Member

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    OK, I would focus more on finding ways to make it work and not on why it might not.

    Actually, I envisioned these to be permitted in areas where larger installations were not viable for current demand or financial reasons. And why would any municipality not want to help already established business and their own tax base? Oh, I know the buggy manufacturers local reps (dealerships) might not be thrilled but neither were the harness makers of yore.

    Take Oklahoma City for example. If someone was traveling east from Nevada they would have to detour north roughly ten miles. If on the other hand there was a two unit portable on all four quadrants no matter which a traveler was coming on, one of the interstates that intersect around Oklahoma City there would be multiple choices to charge.

    Also, in lower demand locations like the intersection of I 69 and I 64 (and nearby US 41 which links to Terre Haute (which also would be a good place for a two unit charger as would US41 and I74 to the north and to the south Western KY Parkway, the Pennyrile in KY (I69) and I24 to the south in TN which in turn goes east to Nashville and west to Paducah KY where I65 intersects).

    I am suggesting that assembly line manufacture would be faster, cheaper and more suitable for some locations. I would think that "portable" would mostly apply to moving from factory to parking space near an already existing sub station at a mall. And they could always go back to the city for an upgrade permit if the usage warranted it.

    As to the time the permitting process takes, Tesla could apply for many more permits and when/if approved, have the palletized unit on site in a few days. I am sure they have the expertise to resolve any engineering challenges and as they gained experience, be able to provide the local contractor with expert guidance.
     
  4. Chipper

    Chipper Active Member

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    The reason for the round-about route for the first cross-country SuperCharger route was Elon's desire to take his five sons on a trip his family took cross-country when he was a boy. The SC's were built to accommodate that same route.
     
  5. invisik

    invisik Member

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    A Tesla-branded CHAdeMO charger, with modified a charge cable to include adaption to the Tesla handle, would probably be easier to pull off with a decent fast charging rate.

    I'd imagine it would have a lower utility electrical requirement, a physically much smaller footprint and shipping weight and no or much less underground wiring needed as it's largely a self-contained unit. Yes would still need a permit/inspection. Would need like 208v 3-phase service with about 160 amp available--some facilities may already have this in their building electrical supply.

    See this Eaton PDF, page 20 shows a Level 2 DC charger. I'd imagine they could be talked into making the chargers for Tesla.

    http://ewh.ieee.org/r3/nashville/events/2011/Electric%20Vehicles%20-%20Review_of_Basics%20-%20IEEE%20-%20MCPQG%20Meeting4.pdf

    Intriguing idea!

    -m
     
  6. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    If Tesla wanted to use CHAdeMO, it would have used CHAdeMO. Tesla DC charging is far superior. It had to be dragged into making the adapter for Japan because of the ubiquity of CHAdeMO charging there, otherwise we wouldn't likely have an adapter in the U.S. Tesla wants to expand Tesla charging not a competing inferior technology.
     

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