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Possible Model 3 options based on Model S, BMW, and Audi

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by nickbaum, Apr 10, 2016.

  1. nickbaum

    nickbaum Member

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    Hi friends,

    I stood in line on the morning of the 31st to pre-order my Model 3, and I've been reading this forum since. Time for a first post!

    Since we've all got 2+ years of anticipation before we actually get our cars, I figured I'd pass the time by speculating about what options would be available, and at what cost:

    Tesla options

    I think it's safe to expect most of the Model S option packages will be available at similar or slightly lower price points. For example, Elon mentioned on Twitter that AWD would cheaper on the Model 3.

    Some of the standard features on the Model S will likely be optional upgrades on the Model 3. Since the Model 3 is ostensibly meant to compete against the BMW 3-series and the Audi A4, I added their option pricing as well.

    Some open questions:
    1. Based on the size and acceleration, I think the 328/A4 is the best starting comparison – but you could perhaps make a case for 320/A3.
    2. AWD makes a Tesla faster. So is AWD on the Model 3 equivalent to the 328 xDrive / regular A4 Quattro, or is it closer to a 340 xDrive / S4?
    3. If the Ludicrous Model S is an M5, it stands to reason that the Ludicrous Model 3 would be an M3. However, there doesn't seem to be an Audi RS4 anymore – so is the S4 the right comparison?
    4. BMW and Audi have various convenience packages with adaptive cruise control etc. but it seems ridiculous to compare those to Tesla's autopilot.
    5. Surprisingly, neither BMW nor Audi seem to have an option for Premium Sound anymore.
    6. Audi's various premium and prestige categories makes it almost impossible to understand the cost of individual options.
    The spreadsheet is read-only, but feel free to chime in with suggested changes or additions and I'll make updates as appropriate.

    Cheers,

    -Nick
     
    • Helpful x 1
  2. LarryG66

    LarryG66 Member

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    I also waited on line for 3 hours on the east coast and was probably 20-25th in line. I like your spreadsheet but what's with the E column. Did you mean to put M3 (Tesla Model 3) where I think you put it? Perhaps you could use a .5*option to guestimate the cost of a M3 option based on the MS similar option. Looking forward to seeing how you add to it. Only suggestion would be to maybe add Supercharging should it not be free (or built into the 35k price). Is the larger battery pack for the Model S really so much more?

    Thanks for putting it together and happy wait!

    Larry
     
  3. EXOTIC1

    EXOTIC1 Member

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    MANY PLACES
    I think you'll see a loaded Tesla m3 with every option will run near 58-63k when's it all said and done after tax/rebate.
    Still a great deal!
     
  4. nickbaum

    nickbaum Member

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    Thanks for the comments, Larry!
    • By M3 in that column, I meant the BMW M3 (as a comparison for a possible Model 3 Ludicrous). I clarified that.
    • I don't have any numbers for the Tesla Model 3 on this spreadsheet, as they would be pure guesses. I doubt the packages will be half the cost of the Model S ones, but I'd happily be surprised :)
    • Supercharging is on there, though of course it's included in the Model S. I think it was a $1-2k option for some of the early models.
    • Yup, the bigger battery pack is indeed that expensive, and probably the biggest thing that throws off comparisons with BMW and Audi. Hopefully the Gigafactory can really drive down the costs there.
    Yup, certainly seems plausible. Then again, so does a decked out BMW 335, not to mention an BMW M3.
     
  5. nickbaum

    nickbaum Member

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    Just updated the spreadsheet to include the Model X and updated Model S options.

    Incidentally, does anyone know what the best comparison would be in the Mercedes lineup?

    I would have included them, but their model range makes no sense to me.
     
  6. zuwarrior14

    zuwarrior14 Member

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    In my opinion the Model S 90D (4.2 sec car) competes directly to the M5 since I don't believe BMW has any cars that is in the league of P90D. That being said, I believe the following.
    1. Base Model3 vs. BMW 328i
    2. Mid Model3 vs. BMW 340i
    3. Performance Model3 vs BMW M3

    They will compete not only performance but also the price as well. I really think that the Performance Model3 will be around $52-55K and with the Ludicrous Mode option around $6-8K it will beat the BMW M3. The reason how I got the price was based on the base Model S 70 ($70K) vs P90D ($108K) which is around ~150%.
     
  7. nickbaum

    nickbaum Member

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    I think that's spot on. The only difference is I'd probably compare the mid-Model3 to a 340i xDrive, since the AWD makes the Tesla faster.
     
  8. zenmaster

    zenmaster Member

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    The M3 is more of performance handling car - something you can take to the track. I don't think you're going to see a Performance Model 3 being able to compete, even at the same price point. The drag strip is another story.
     
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  9. nickbaum

    nickbaum Member

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    Absolutely, although I'd argue that both the drag strip nor the track are edge cases. I imagine a lot of people buy an M3 because they want a car that feels fun and exciting to drive on a daily basis, and on that front, I think a Ludicrous Model3 would compare quite well.

    I used to own a 335 M-Sport Convertible. Certainly not a track car, but it sure was fun to take it for a spin in the hills of California.
     
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  10. zuwarrior14

    zuwarrior14 Member

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    I totally agree, 99% of people are not going to the Track and I would say majority of people who bought the BMW M3 wouldn't go to the Track that much anyway. The topic about going to the Track is irrelevant and yet I do not find a good reason why people who brought it up. Bringing in a scenario which 99% doesn't apply to this topic is somewhat a waste of time.
     
  11. zenmaster

    zenmaster Member

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    It was brought up because when people talk about performance handling, that's is the benchmark? I understand many people don't track it, yet people will also claim performance handling on par with a modern sports car (the BMW M3) and the answer is, currently, no. The model 3 is going to be a great car for the price, and fun to drive in its own right. But it won't be setting any handling records in the performance car category.
     
  12. nickbaum

    nickbaum Member

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    I think it's a totally fair comparison. The M3 is designed and tuned for the track in ways that Teslas probably won't be for the foreseeable future.

    This being said, I have never driven P90D Model S, but from the reviews it sounds like it handles quite well, thanks to the even weight distribution and low center of gravity. Maybe not quite as well as an M5, but not as far off as people might think.

    Based on that, I expect the performance of top end Model 3 will be quite enough to appeal to the large number of M3 owners who never take their car to the track.
     

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