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So I noticed in the demo they gave for the Roadster that the frunk and trunk were unaccessible. That leads me to believe that that is where they shoved all the extra batteries needed to get the roadster up to 620 miles of range. But that of course will not work for the production version, so they will need to put the extra batteries somewhere else. Now a lot of people here have hypothesized that they will simply double stack the floor mounted battery pack. Unfortunately, this seems like a bad idea as it would lead to significantly reduced overhead space in the cabin for the driver and his/her occupants. However, there is another battery placement option I have not seen discussed here. The additional batteries could occupy the same space as where a traditional ice car's drive shaft would have been; and hidden under the center console. The remaining batteries can then be hidden under slimmer modified versions of the front and rear seats of the car. See Below.

In fact I like this idea so much why not, after the Roadster is finished, add it to Tesla's other offerings. Have a "range extending" checkbox option for a price somewhere between 35,000 - 50,000 which would essentially double the size of any car battery. How great would it be to get the Model X, Model S or the Model 3 in a 600 mi version. A version nearly imperceptible from the non range extending version.



ModelS_Battery_Idea.jpg
 

NeverFollow

Active Member
Aug 9, 2010
1,278
809
...However, there is another battery placement option I have not seen discussed here.

The additional batteries could occupy the same space as where a traditional ice car's drive shaft would have been;
and hidden under the center console. The remaining batteries can then be hidden under slimmer modified versions
of the front and rear seats of the car. See Below.

May be a little bit like the following: A closer look at Audi’s new R8 e-tron EV and battery

6a00d8341c4fbe53ef01bb084179c7970d-800wi
 

Derek Kessler

Active Member
Apr 15, 2016
1,193
1,879
Cincinnati
There's no indication that the prototypes used in the demo actually had the full range capability. Certainly, none of them were demonstrated using the full 200kWh battery capacity. Demo prototypes are often built expressly to meet the demands of the demo and aren't necessarily viable outside of that situation.
 
There's no indication that the prototypes used in the demo actually had the full range capability. Certainly, none of them were demonstrated using the full 200kWh battery capacity. Demo prototypes are often built expressly to meet the demands of the demo and aren't necessarily viable outside of that situation.

They’ve given test drives. You cannot achive a 0-60 mph in 1.9 seconds without the 200kWh battery.

Tesla Roadster performance specs are actual and not theoretical, says test driver

Jay Leno Takes a Ride in the 2020 Tesla Roadster
 
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mongo

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2017
16,660
62,804
Michigan
Now a lot of people here have hypothesized that they will simply double stack the floor mounted battery pack. Unfortunately, this seems like a bad idea as it would lead to significantly reduced overhead space in the cabin for the driver and his/her occupants.

Double stacked 2170s add about 3 inches of height. The reclined seating position and low ground clearance soak that up.

Your second level of pack runs though all the cross car support structure for the seats. The flat pack and floor allows for the use of simple C channels.

Roadster may not even have a frunk.
 

hill

high fiber member
Apr 21, 2015
1,374
774
either MT or TN
They’ve given test drives. You cannot achive a 0-60 mph in 1.9 seconds without the 200kWh battery.

Tesla Roadster performance specs are actual and not theoretical, says test driver

Jay Leno Takes a Ride in the 2020 Tesla Roadster
just gave myself a chuckle thinking if you went in for a 150kWh supercharger visit, & you're paired up with another tesla already on the pair ..... & /or a weak connection in the supercharger .... so you're lucky to pull 50 KW as is sometimes the case. You'll be stuck there for what ... 3hrs?
:p
.
 
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In another thread people who were at the reveal and got to ride in it commented that it definitely seemed possible that the Roadster did in fact have a "double stacked pack" given the seating position in the car. To me, Occam's Razor says this is most likely the case given this feedback and Elon's comments. FWIW, I was at the reveal, but didn't get a test ride.
 

mongo

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2017
16,660
62,804
Michigan
I think it will have one. (although didn't see an opening on prototype car)

You can't physically place cells in front crumple zone.

Right, they would not put cells in front of the axle.
My thought is that, due to low profile, the radiators, condenser, AC compressor, steering rack, and front motor may take up all the space. Though, it will need a way to fill the washer fluid, so it may have a hood...
 
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I doubt it will be anything but the typical battery sled in packaging. There's more ways to increase range than just shear battery capacity.

Weight is the mortal enemy of a sports car and dynamic performance targets. Just more battery with significant weight penalties is not going to be how they do it. Definitely not the frunk position either as this would lead to poor handling dynamics with significant weight hung over the front end.

There will be advancements in battery technology, and power density to allow the sled battery to meet its power goals. Including the addition of Maxwell Technologies supercapacitor.

The roadster is going to have aero benefits on account of it being low profile vehicle. That in itself well lend a great portion of its range capability.
 
I doubt it will be anything but the typical battery sled in packaging. There's more ways to increase range than just shear battery capacity.

Weight is the mortal enemy of a sports car and dynamic performance targets. Just more battery with significant weight penalties is not going to be how they do it. Definitely not the frunk position either as this would lead to poor handling dynamics with significant weight hung over the front end.

There will be advancements in battery technology, and power density to allow the sled battery to meet its power goals. Including the addition of Maxwell Technologies supercapacitor.

The roadster is going to have aero benefits on account of it being low profile vehicle. That in itself well lend a great portion of its range capability.
and don't forget roadsters/low profile sports cars have the advantage of weight savings. you're not typically looking for a ton of gadgets, insulation, third rows, and cabin comfort when you're talking about sports cars that move this fast. cut 1000lbs+ and you're going to see a great increase in efficiency and speed.

i'm just hoping that whatever battery technology they've landed on allows for "v4" supercharging and/or some sort of a parallel charging system that will allow this to make sense to charge it at home.
 
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ryanjm

Tesla Podcast Host
Oct 10, 2009
634
545
San Francisco, CA
i'm just hoping that whatever battery technology they've landed on allows for "v4" supercharging and/or some sort of a parallel charging system that will allow this to make sense to charge it at home.

You mean Megacharging? I wonder how the Tesla Semi truck drivers would feel about a Roadster rolling up on their charging stop every now and again. :p
 
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