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Pre-Delivery Repair

Discussion in 'Model S: Ordering, Production, Delivery' started by TheDoctor, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. TheDoctor

    TheDoctor Member

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    The vehicle arrived and everything checked out with one exception. The front bumper received 3 - 1/2" scratches below the driver side headlight that will require it to be corrected at a local auto-body shop. So my Friday/Saturday delivery just became next week sometime.

    Question for anyone that has experience with these kind of issues... I inquired about how they were going to correct this issue and the response was that likely the entire front bumper would get painted with a possibility they would do just a smaller region. My concern is that the Silver of the bumper won't be exactly the same as the body of the car. I have seen a number of paint jobs be "mostly" successful but still obvious to those that look in the right light or have a good eye for detail.

    What else should I be asking or verifying? Obviously this is going to be one of the things I will inspect in detail, tips on what/how to ensure it is a quality job?
     
  2. AnOutsider

    AnOutsider S532 # XS27

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    I would just thoroughly inspect it before taking delivery. If it doesn't match, ask it to be redone (super escalation would be asking for a fresh bumper all together)
     
  3. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    If this was on a brand new vehicle, I would insist on a new bumper being shipped from factory and installed. Your brand new car should not need to go to the body shop at your inconvenience. Make some noise.
     
  4. WeazL

    WeazL Moderator - Hawaii

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    Given that it's brand new, a good body shop should be able to match the paint with good accuracy as there is no fading as with older cars. When in transport, Tesla is not in control of the vehicle--the contracted shipper is--and realistically, some cars get damaged in transit. Tesla is obligated to repair the damages and settle any claims with the shipper directly as it is still technically in their possession, even though you may have paid for it already, since you have not received the vehicle.

    The bottom line is, if the repair is not to your liking, don't hesitate to let them know. Don't sign the acceptance document until the vehicle meets your expectations. Once you sign it, the vehicle is your responsibility and any further claims regarding physical appearance and related damage are at their discretion, and no longer an obligation.

    IMHO though, I 'm sure the service center contracts a good body shop to work on their vehicles, so I would not worry. If you didn't know about the damage ahead of time, you probably wouldn't have noticed if they had fixed it without you knowing. ;)
     
  5. texex91

    texex91 Banned

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    #5 texex91, Oct 18, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2013
    Body shop should handle without question (well I hope at least). Pretty simple fix, but I wouldn't be happy either--trust me.

    If you're not happy, then go a diffferent route, but let them try and take care of it first.

    Hey you might get a free jacket or other trinket for the wait...AND you'll get a loaner to 'play' with for a few days.
     
  6. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    What color is the vehicle? I would find it difficult to imagine that a body shop can duplicate Tesla's multi-coat red. It's more than just matching the paint, the process is important as well. How will the matched paint look under different lighting conditions, or while wearing polarized sunglasses? Just thinking out loud.
     
  7. TheDoctor

    TheDoctor Member

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    It is not a multiple-coat which I expect would require a new one from the factory.

    Model S85 - Silver - Pano - Tech - Parking Sensors

    Unfortunately, no loaner during the interim. :crying:
     
  8. Cinematechs

    Cinematechs Member

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    Sounds to me as if they need to find new transport companies. I'll bet its from loading unloading from car carriers. They need to start shipping the cars with covered carriers that include horizontal lift systems. I wouldn't sign unless a new bumper was sent from the plant. I'd take a slight variance in color over a local body shop's work. New piece or no signing.
     
  9. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    Sorry, I see now that you said it was silver in your original post. Silver shouldn't be especially difficult for a body shop. I am in agreement with Cinematechs, I would demand a new bumper be shipped out from Fremont and would not accept anything less. Whether a body shop can do an okay job is not the question. You paid approximately $100k (or close to it) for a car to have to send it to a body shop upon delivery? That should be unacceptable to Tesla, and ultimately you bought the car from Tesla and it's their responsibility to make you happy. Whatever insurance arrangements they have with their carriers is between Tesla and the carriers - not your problem. Tesla can ship you a new bumper to make things right, and Tesla will ultimately recover what they can recover through the carrier's insurance (not your problem).

    I've noticed with Tesla that the more noise you make, the harder they work to make you happy. Whichever route you choose, make sure it's the one that makes you happy and satisfied with your purchase.
     
  10. JohnQ

    JohnQ Active Member

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    It's two days late but I'll chime in with real world experience. My car was delivered with a rock chip on the rear quarter panel from being transported on an uncovered carrier. Maybe 1" long in total. Tesla told me to take it to their local body shop at my convenience for repair. I had vacation scheduled two months later so took it that week.

    The entire panel was repainted. There is no noticeable difference between it and the rest of the vehicle. Don't sweat having your bumper repainted rather than getting a replacement, neither you nor anyone else will be able to tell the difference.
     
  11. Gizmotoy

    Gizmotoy Active Member

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    As a counter-point, repainted/non-stock bumpers are the very first thing many buyers look at when buying a used car.

    It's often quite easy upon close inspection to see the slight orangepeel effect that is common with repainted bumpers, even though you can't tell from a foot or more away. This effect is more common on bumper repaints than on metal panels because of the flex agent that has to be added to the paint so the bumpers can bend without the paint cracking.

    Many automakers also now hide a VIN plate on both bumpers, though since I don't have mine yet I haven't looked to see if Tesla does that. This is done to help buyers easily identify cars that have been in accidents, since a new VIN plate can't be added if the bumper is repainted or replaced.

    So there is some risk a savvy buyer will notice the bumper has been repaired, which could affect resale value down the road.
     
  12. AmpedRealtor

    AmpedRealtor Active Member

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    Unless owners refuse to accept delivery of damaged vehicles, what is Tesla's incentive to improve the process? I understand issues happen, but is the appropriate response to make it the owner's problem or to step and make it right for the owner? I don't consider sending the owner to a body shop as making it right.
     

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