TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC

Programming NEW TPMS -- Can OVMS do this?

Discussion in 'Roadster: Technical' started by arijaycomet, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. arijaycomet

    arijaycomet Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2014
    Messages:
    580
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Background:
    Vehicle in question is my 2010 Tesla Roadster Sport 2.0 which is about to get a new set of shoes (wheels/tires/TPMS are all entirely new-- a thread about this forthcoming). In doing my homework on here it appears that the TPMS in my car (433mhz baolong style) will need to be programmed. Having owned dozens of cars before, I've seen all variations. Many VW/Audi cars just find the four sensors automatically, no programming needed. Some cars use ABS sensors too. But of course some cars, like our old Nissan Leaf, needed to be programmed with the serial number of the four sensors. That much I get.....

    Question:
    Rather than having to visit the Tesla service center, can this be done DIY? My car has a OVMS system (the latest v3 box on the latest software). Is there a command line in the shell that might allow for these serial numbers to be programmed? If not, can this feature be added?

    Sidebar:
    It is my understanding that the programming of the Roadster is the proprietary part. That makes sense, since the cable is unique-- but since the OVMS is using that cable, it seems like ti SHOULD be feasible. Worse case I'll just let the local SC take care of scanning them for me (they said they could/would do this) -- it is all of but 2 miles away -- but if the serial #s are listed on my receipt then I'd prefer to DIY.

    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. gregd

    gregd Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2014
    Messages:
    1,950
    Location:
    CM98
    So far, the best anyone's done programming the TPMS in a Roadster has been scotty2541, but it took some invasive steps to do so. See TPMS CONTINUES TO FAIL... [RANT] And they are gonna send people the mars? There are a few other threads on the topic as well. Best bet at this point is to have a Tesla SC do the programming, but if you can figure it out, you'll have a lot of interested folks on this forum interested in how you did it.
     
  3. ShawnA

    ShawnA Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    Edwardsburg, MI
    Hi Arijaycomet,

    Your receipt may state the addresses of the sensors but if it does not tell what positions
    they are located at you are doomed for Scotty's hack.

    If you are 2 miles from a Service center go there and have them program the car.
    It takes less than 10 minutes.

    I used Scotty's hack to program mine.
    I knew all 4 addresses and their locations.
    You have to remove one of the antennas - Front or Back...
    You need a Microchip LIN converter for about $70 plus shipping from Microchip.

    I have heavily researched the subject.
    I currently own an ATEQ VT55 which claimed Tesla support.
    BUT it only READS the sensors it cannot program the car...

    Save yourself too much aggravation and go to the Service Center.
    I would but mine is 120 miles away in Chicago..................
    I will drive a demo Roadster in Chicago but not mine.

    Shawn
     
    • Informative x 1
  4. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Messages:
    4,190
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    From what we know, the TPMS system in the 2.x roadsters is programmed via K-Line on the OBDII connector, using a special tool.

    The TPMS module is also connected to the CAN bus that OVMS is connected to, and it *may* be programmable via CAN messages, but we have no information on that (and no way to get the information other than breaking apart a TPMS module and reverse-engineering the code). If somebody wants to send me their broken TPMS module, I'm willing to have a go at it.

    The approach that would be most likely to succeed would be to get a dump of the K-Line transmissions during a sensor reprogram using the Tesla tool (along with a written record of the sensor IDs each wheel has). That would be done by teeing the K-Line while reprogramming the TPMS module with sensor IDs. We could then look at a hardware/software combination to re-implement that same protocol. Most tools can read the sensor IDs from the wheels - it is the protocol to program the TPMS module with those IDs that is the tricky part.
     
    • Informative x 1
  5. ShawnA

    ShawnA Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    Edwardsburg, MI
    Hi Markwj,

    I would be happy to work with you on this if you have some time in October (2018).
    I have used Scotty's hack to program my rear antenna.
    The front antenna still has information from my old sensors.

    Briefly Scotty's work involves 8 2 digit codes that are sent over the CANBUS by LIN(?).
    Since the TPMS ECU does not store the information, I think it is safe to ignore it.
    Codes 10,11,12,13 write the addresses to the two antennas.
    Codes 14,15,16, 17 read back the addresses.

    So to code the addresses into the rear antenna, I used the following commands:
    12 08811495 0881136B This wrote the front tires to the rear antenna which was removed from the car at that time.
    13 08811B51 088118B2 Wrote the rear tires to the rear antenna.
    I plugged in the antenna and drove the car a few miles and the pressure and temperature information
    populated after a few miles...

    We can do this. Peoples problems may be "getting" the addresses in the first place.
    Most TPMS tools can read our addresses - None available to us at this time can write to the car...

    Shawn
     
    • Informative x 1
  6. markwj

    markwj Moderator, Asia Pacific

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Messages:
    4,190
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    I really don't want to use the LIN bus for this, because (a) it is programming the antennas not the ECU, (b) it is not available on the diagnostic connectors, and (c) I don't like LIN :)

    The absolute best way would be to find a way to do this over CAN. But, that is not how Tesla program this, and we don't even know if it is possible. Reverse engineering the ECU code may work, would probably be fun to do, but is a huge hassle and perhaps destructive to the ECU (depending on how potted it is).

    The simplest way, and the one with the most likelyhood of success, is to use the same K-line that the Tesla tool already uses. That is available on the diagnostic connectors in the car. All we need to do is capture that traffic, from the Tesla tool, then replicate it ourselves. While OVMS doesn't support K-line today, we are working on a very cheap optional expansion board that will add that capability (one chip, a couple of passive components, and a new cable). The issue is getting hold of the tool for enough time to do this. I know some members here had purchased it (when it was available on the Tesla store), so perhaps it could be lent?
     
    • Informative x 1

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.
  • Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


    SUPPORT TMC