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Pros & Cons of Tesla in the delivery service

Pros:
- half the cost in $/mil in package delivery vs gas car
- automatic, contactless keyless open/close the car
- additional security with seven cameras, including the cabin-facing camera

Cons:
- expensive initial investment
- potential damage to the car due to vandalism while on delivery
- high driver seat position is not convenient for frequent stops during the delivery

Anyway, the self-driving car in delivery is the future for online shopping.
 

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I don't like using the door/ignition keys for frequent stops in a regular car.

I was just curious to compare the cost of delivery in EV vs gas car.
It seems that the EV has around half the cost in $/mi.

I found some Pros and Cons and shared them it with you.

Currently, I have a brand new Tesla 3.
 

AMPd

Well-Known Member
Nov 27, 2012
5,009
5,339
Northern California
I don't like using the door/ignition keys for frequent stops in a regular car.

I was just curious to compare the cost of delivery in EV vs gas car.
It seems that the EV has around half the cost in $/mi.

I found some Pros and Cons and shared them it with you.

Currently, I have a brand new Tesla 3.
I don’t think too many people would be buying a 70k car to use it for a delivery service. I’d would make way more financial sense to get a prius for that.
 
True, total cost of ownership should always be considered, not just the cost to propel the vehicle down the road. Tires are expensive for an S (even cheap ones) and get consumed quicker due to the car's weight. If used full time for delivery, you'd also take a giant bath on depreciation when you go to sell a 3 year old luxury car with 100k on the clock.

I thought this thread was about taking delivery of a new car until I saw the Amazon boxes. Here is some more math:

A 55mpg Prius costs about $0.039 per mile to go down the road with gas @ $2.16/gal which is the current national average. My average energy consumption over the past ~14 months has been 342wh/mi. Average national kwh cost is $0.1331, so it costs $0.046 per mile to send my Tesla down the road (assuming no supercharging which costs more). If I just wanted to save money I would have bought a Prius.
 

AMPd

Well-Known Member
Nov 27, 2012
5,009
5,339
Northern California
True, total cost of ownership should always be considered, not just the cost to propel the vehicle down the road. Tires are expensive for an S (even cheap ones) and get consumed quicker due to the car's weight. If used full time for delivery, you'd also take a giant bath on depreciation when you go to sell a 3 year old luxury car with 100k on the clock.

I thought this thread was about taking delivery of a new car until I saw the Amazon boxes. Here is some more math:

A 55mpg Prius costs about $0.039 per mile to go down the road with gas @ $2.16/gal which is the current national average. My average energy consumption over the past ~14 months has been 342wh/mi. Average national kwh cost is $0.1331, so it costs $0.046 per mile to send my Tesla down the road (assuming no supercharging which costs more). If I just wanted to save money I would have bought a Prius.
In 3 years you’d lose the entire cost of the Prius in depreciation alone.
 
I use my S as a volunteer to deliver food for people in need. The last time I went, there were a couple of deliveries that the coordinators were hesitant to ask me to do because they were far. It was only half an hour and I had HOV stickers.

One drawback is that it might be hard to find a parking space and the car is not an obvious delivery vehicle that could get away with temporary parking.

One of the reasons I chose to volunteer was to find an excuse to drive my car since work and school are remote.
 
I use my S as a volunteer to deliver food for people in need. The last time I went, there were a couple of deliveries that the coordinators were hesitant to ask me to do because they were far. It was only half an hour and I had HOV stickers.

One drawback is that it might be hard to find a parking space and the car is not an obvious delivery vehicle that could get away with temporary parking.

One of the reasons I chose to volunteer was to find an excuse to drive my car since work and school are remote.
I use my S as a volunteer to deliver food for people in need. The last time I went, there were a couple of deliveries that the coordinators were hesitant to ask me to do because they were far. It was only half an hour and I had HOV stickers.

One drawback is that it might be hard to find a parking space and the car is not an obvious delivery vehicle that could get away with temporary parking.

One of the reasons I chose to volunteer was to find an excuse to drive my car since work and school are remote.
 
I use my S as a volunteer to deliver food for people in need. The last time I went, there were a couple of deliveries that the coordinators were hesitant to ask me to do because they were far. It was only half an hour and I had HOV stickers.

One drawback is that it might be hard to find a parking space and the car is not an obvious delivery vehicle that could get away with temporary parking.

You didn’t answer my question, Who physically takes the package out of the car?

Doesn't matter how the parcel is out of the self-driving car in-garage delivery: robotic arm, hole in the bottom of the car or a drone. The principal is the customer who gives the car permission to 1-click open/ close the door in his garage or yard and could watch it.
 
True, total cost of ownership should always be considered, not just the cost to propel the vehicle down the road. Tires are expensive for an S (even cheap ones) and get consumed quicker due to the car's weight. If used full time for delivery, you'd also take a giant bath on depreciation when you go to sell a 3 year old luxury car with 100k on the clock.

I thought this thread was about taking delivery of a new car until I saw the Amazon boxes. Here is some more math:

A 55mpg Prius costs about $0.039 per mile to go down the road with gas @ $2.16/gal which is the current national average. My average energy consumption over the past ~14 months has been 342wh/mi. Average national kwh cost is $0.1331, so it costs $0.046 per mile to send my Tesla down the road (assuming no supercharging which costs more). If I just wanted to save money I would have bought a Prius.

If I just planned to work in a delivery service I would be looking for EV of 100mi driving range. The car price will cut dramatically. It will ultimately be determined by the size of the battery in the car.
 

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