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Public Charging Etiquette - Unplugging Teslas from J1772s

Discussion in 'Model S' started by LeafDriver, Mar 4, 2018.

?

Unplug Teslas when all EVSEs are full?

  1. Yes any charge level

    1.9%
  2. No

    91.6%
  3. Only when my battery is < 50%

    2.3%
  4. Only when my battery is < 25%

    4.2%
  1. GatorGuy

    GatorGuy Member

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    I agree. The only real answer is to let the free market decide who really "needs" to charge. If there were no more free chargers and everyone had to pay for their electricity it would guarantee change behavior. It would almost 100% open up chargers to people who really needed the charge.

    Also paying for it would hopefully get more high speed chargers as well.
     
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  2. scaesare

    scaesare Well-Known Member

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    It seems that there are relatively few folks here that disagree with this premise and are of the "screw everyone else" mindset... (but there are indeed a few).

    I applied the emphasis as I did for a reason: the premise is that it's something to be given... not taken.


    Here is where the larger disagreement seems to be. For all the reasons previously pointed out, this blanket assertion may not hold true (person has to travel some distance after work, they have a 100 mile commute in the cold in a 60, etc...).

    For example, there's a guy here who drives 120+ miles after work on some days in his Tesla. In the cold weather we get, that can burn 200 miles of range. The 208V/40A charger we have her only adds ~24 miles per hour.

    Hence, the blanket assertion is something that simply can't be known for the vast majority of situations, and is hence invalid.


    Again with the blanket assertions.

    Average US commute distance: 16 miles. And 92% of commutes are less than 35 miles

    2016 Nissan Leaf Range: 107 miles.

    Even in the cold the Leaf should easily get the vast majority of people to and from work without charging at work at all. As eould the 81 mile i3. And that's not the new 2018 Leaf w/ 150+ miles range. Or the i3/REx or a Volt. Once again, this blanket assertion is invalid.


    The point is, circumstances can, and do, vary. Making blanket assertions as to when to TAKE charging from others when you can't know all of those circumstances is every bit as much of an entitled action as is the discourteous person who hogs a charge station.
     
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  3. Electroman

    Electroman Active Member

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    It is always convenient to make the edge cases as the standard scenario and work on a a solution to accommodate those edge cases.
     
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  4. scaesare

    scaesare Well-Known Member

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    Or, it illustrates that blanket "one size fits all" generalizations seldom hold.
     
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  5. Electroman

    Electroman Active Member

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    No. The way you do it is, you have a goal something like,

    "Maximize the number of people who can reach their destination with the shortest wait time possible".

    If each one voluntarily stops charging after they have enough charge (to whatever comfort level they have) then everyone can get to the pie and eat it too. On the other hand, if each one takes the position, 'I hold the charger now and I can stay here as long as I want even if I don't need the charge' - then we have a problem. And that problem is acute in free chargers, because then greed takes over courtesy and civilized behavior.
     
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  6. anicolao

    anicolao Member

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    Perhaps it's regional. I'm not the charger police, but most places I live in Canada have free EV spots and it's usually reasonable to assume that the vehicles parked there are parked for good reasons. Perhaps in other countries the situation is much worse -- it certainly seems that way based on this thread where the basics we were taught in kindergarten seem not to apply.
     
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  7. trm2

    trm2 Member

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    Well, there you go ruining things with logic and common sense.
     
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  8. JayyyDeee

    JayyyDeee Member

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    Why would I not be allowed to use public charging at a mall like anyone else your post makes zero sense
     
  9. anicolao

    anicolao Member

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  10. bhzmark

    bhzmark Supporting Member

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    #150 bhzmark, Mar 7, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2018
    You shouldn't take up a limited public resource, like chargers, when you don't need it and others do.

    Selfish small minds cannot grasp the sense in such a simple point.
     
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  11. Electroman

    Electroman Active Member

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    +100

    The point that I have been trying to make throughout this thread.
     
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  12. scaesare

    scaesare Well-Known Member

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    Nobody's disagreeing with not using a shared resource unnecessarily being the right thing to do.

    The point is that you can't possibly dictate what's "unnecessary" for everyone else.

    THAT is the point I don't understand why it's so hard for some to grasp.
     
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  13. Retrospected

    Retrospected Member

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    So from what I gather in this post, many people seem to believe that you shouldn’t use a public charger for convenience, only necessity?
     
  14. bhzmark

    bhzmark Supporting Member

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    You missed the key ingredient from the original post.

     
  15. brkaus

    brkaus Active Member

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    Bottom line - charging should not be free. It brings out irrational behavior.

    See also - 20 min Costco gas lines to save $0.10 per gallon.
     
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  16. Electroman

    Electroman Active Member

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    #156 Electroman, Mar 7, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 7, 2018
    charging should not be free and so should be idle parking at a charger.
     
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  17. Racerx22b

    Racerx22b @unplggdd on Instagram

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    I've re-read your posts in hopes I would somehow be enlightened of your viewpoint but all I could surmise is that you assume if all chargers are being used some or all of those people shouldn't be there because a short range EV's need to charge is greater than theirs.

    The problem with your assumption is that you have no idea what the needs of the people plugged in are.

    I think nearly everyone that has been a part of this thread agrees that using the limited resource only when necessary is the right thing to do. Including me. Our contention with your outlook is that you assume any Tesla plugged in shouldn't be because they could drive home or to a nearby supercharger to a charge. This is flawed logic. Some Teslas aren't even able to use superchargers.

    It seems to me if you bought a vehicle that is not in line with your daily driving habits and because of that poor vehicle choice you want anyone with an EV that has long range to bow down to short range EV because "they need it more". Nobody can possibly know with any certainty who needs it more unless they interact with the vehicle owner. Therefore, the first come, first serve rule is the law of the land for how I approach public charging. And it should be the same for all.

    There is another part of this equation you're missing.... If you unplug someone you might return to a car that is not in the same condition as you left it. Keyed, door kicked in, window cracked, flat tire.... I wouldn't put it past someone to do any or all of that. That is not how I would do it but this is the world we live in now. I suggest your proceed with care.
     
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  18. GatorGuy

    GatorGuy Member

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    Glad we can agree on that.
     
  19. bhzmark

    bhzmark Supporting Member

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    That's the essense of your point. And people who reason from probabilities, and discount edge cases, are incomprehensible to you.

    I don't know how people get through life requiring certainty and not thinking probabilistically -- poorly I imagine.

    But anyway, if you require more info unplug them and watch the screen to see the charge state. It's really so simple.
     
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  20. Racerx22b

    Racerx22b @unplggdd on Instagram

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    When using probability in making decisions with regards to what affects you and only you this is fine and completely logical. When you are dealing with other people's lives and/or property you should proceed with certainty. I have got through life quite well with little to no issues with this philosophy. Thank you for inquiring.

    If you can see the car is at 100% charge this is the only scenario I would so is okay to unplug. Anything short of that you do not touch. I still think it's a little sketch to mess with another person's car and I don't think I would do so but you do you.
     
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