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Pulls to the LEFT under Acceleration, pulls to the RIGHT under Regen.

Dec 26, 2018
686
600
TX
Can I ask anyone is this a concern for something to break? I had my car in to service 9 days ago for this exact issue. They said the car was out of alignment (literally the ONE driver rear tire only) they fixed the alignment and everything was fine. Until today. Now it’s swaying out the back end so badly it gives me vertigo when driving. my rear drive unit is due to be replaced as they have the parts “on order” so I really don’t want to pay them for labor to do all this crap when I know they’ll get my DU and have to drop it anyhow. No one is able to tell me if it’s ok for me to drive the car until the DU arrives.

Do you have a jack at home? Lift each corner off the ground and see if there's any any slack in the wheel that would indicate a bushing is worn (put your hands at 3 and 9 o-clock and wiggle, same at 12 and 6.)
 
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CFinVancouver

Member
Jun 3, 2016
132
97
Vancouver
Finally had some time to jack up the rear and look at my rear suspension. Both toe links have significant play at the wheel side. I was experiencing a floating feel when the rear end swaying a little. Also I would notice some clunking over speed bumps like something was rolling around in the frunk/trunk.
I am curious if this will solve the issue, or do several parts needs replacing other than the links and bolts. Seems like a doable fix at home, then a wheel alignment done later.
This in on a Model S 2015 85D with 97000km.
 
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Dec 26, 2018
686
600
TX
WOW, that's significant. Yeah, those links are toast. IIRC you have to cut the inner bolt to remove it (not enough room otherwise), so order new toe links AND nuts/bolts/eccentric washers at the same time.

When cutting the bolt, don't back the nut all the way out so you have something to get leverage against to push that end out. Install the inner bolts backwards when you replace so you won't have to cut them next time. It's an easy job with two wrenches and a saw-zall.

After you replace the link, repeat the process and make sure your wheel bearing isn't bad too (same sort of motion).
 

CFinVancouver

Member
Jun 3, 2016
132
97
Vancouver
WOW, that's significant. Yeah, those links are toast. IIRC you have to cut the inner bolt to remove it (not enough room otherwise), so order new toe links AND nuts/bolts/eccentric washers at the same time.

When cutting the bolt, don't back the nut all the way out so you have something to get leverage against to push that end out. Install the inner bolts backwards when you replace so you won't have to cut them next time. It's an easy job with two wrenches and a saw-zall.

After you replace the link, repeat the process and make sure your wheel bearing isn't bad too (same sort of motion).
Oh joy, the pleasures of owning a Model S. Question, will the eccentric bolt operate the same, mounted in the opposite direction? The seat the bolt head/washer combo sits in must be symmetrical from from both directions for and aft for this to work. How hardened are these bolts? Will I go through a few blades getting them out?
Hopefully the bearings are not an issue, the motion/wobble is only in one plane. Would I be looking at any other links to replace, or is this the weak one in the whole assembly? Thanks for your advice.
I hope the video wasn't too long, got to work on my editing/scripting.
 
Dec 26, 2018
686
600
TX
Oh joy, the pleasures of owning a Model S. Question, will the eccentric bolt operate the same, mounted in the opposite direction? The seat the bolt head/washer combo sits in must be symmetrical from from both directions for and aft for this to work. How hardened are these bolts? Will I go through a few blades getting them out?
Hopefully the bearings are not an issue, the motion/wobble is only in one plane. Would I be looking at any other links to replace, or is this the weak one in the whole assembly? Thanks for your advice.
I hope the video wasn't too long, got to work on my editing/scripting.
Eccentric bolt will operate the same. There's one on each side, so there's really "no change" as far as they're concerned. This is what the Service Center does to replace toe arms as well, because otherwise you'd have to drop the entire rear subframe. They're manufactured with the bolts installed the 'wrong way' due to limitations with the robotics.

Should be a one-blade activity, but easier to buy two and have a spare.

Hard to say if anything else is worn out.....certainly could be, if your toe links are that fubar'd. The only other possibilities are upper and lower control arm, and you could try to move them with a crowbar to see if they are worn too.

The wheel bearing is a "hub assembly," and isn't any more difficult to replace - all of the parts you need are rentable at home depot, and I believe it's a 32mm axle nut (I'll check when I get home). But, take it one step at a time....the Toe link is definitely the biggest culprit in your dilema.
 
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Gtech

Member
Dec 4, 2016
577
714
NL, Berkel en Rodenrijs
IIRC you have to cut the inner bolt to remove it

*not always, few weeks ago we changed a right rear toe link due to excessive play on a 2016 P90D with the knowledge that the bolt needs to be cut but with a little wiggling we managed to get the old bolt out and back in without cutting or modifying. Don't know why some cars can or can't do but obviously it saved us some time lol.

@tezcatcatl witnessed this moment of glory.
 

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tezcatcatl

Member
Jan 23, 2021
83
21
Netherlands
*not always, few weeks ago we changed a right rear toe link due to excessive play on a 2016 P90D with the knowledge that the bolt needs to be cut but with a little wiggling we managed to get the old bolt out and back in without cutting or modifying. Don't know why some cars can or can't do but obviously it saved us some time lol.

@tezcatcatl witnessed this moment of glory.
It was indeed glorious :D
 

CFinVancouver

Member
Jun 3, 2016
132
97
Vancouver
2015 Model S 85D
Just test drove the car after changing out both rear toe links, it feels more confident on the road with no more rear end drift.
I used two jacks, one to elevate one side of the car and the other under the wheel knuckle to control the height of the wheel assembly while installing the new link. A few things to note, I removed a few plastic clips to allow the wheel liner to move more out of the way. I also measure the wheel centre to the wheel well arch so I had an idea there the wheel assembly should sit, sans wheel, while I torqued the link in (the second jack).
As suggested, I did not need to cut the bolt, removed the exterior one first, then wiggled the interior out. When the assembly is at the correct height, there is not a lot of room to work, I could see where removing the undercover would give better access.
Finally, I went in person to collect the parts from Tesla, they said why did I not just email in advance and they would have them ready. Tesla treats the parts department like an afterthought, but I was glad they had them. Two links were 111.00 CDN (funny how we make them here, ship them south and then ship them back up to Canada again...). The new part is textured to prevent slipping, but my issue was with the wheel side developing a lot of play.
Much appreciate all the suggestions and guidance;-)
 

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Zuikkis

Member
Aug 19, 2020
268
321
Finland
Incredible that the bolt can be removed without cutting, no way that would have worked on mine. See the attached picture..

Perhaps it's a model year difference, mine is a 2013.
 

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mrjedistud

Member
Aug 3, 2015
252
47
New York
Finally had some time to jack up the rear and look at my rear suspension. Both toe links have significant play at the wheel side. I was experiencing a floating feel when the rear end swaying a little. Also I would notice some clunking over speed bumps like something was rolling around in the frunk/trunk.
I am curious if this will solve the issue, or do several parts needs replacing other than the links and bolts. Seems like a doable fix at home, then a wheel alignment done later.
This in on a Model S 2015 85D with 97000km.

This video is super helpful. Thanks. I may try to tackle this issue when I swap to winter tires next month
 

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