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Question for Current Model S Oweners/Reservation holders?

Discussion in 'Model S' started by BenTesla, Apr 16, 2013.


How long should Tesla wait before major updates on the Model S? (All times from today

  1. It's OK to do it now!!

    11 vote(s)
  2. Another year

    9 vote(s)
  3. Another two years

    4 vote(s)
  4. More than 2 years

    1 vote(s)
  1. BenTesla

    BenTesla Member

    Jun 18, 2012
    How long do think Tesla should wait before major updates with the Model S to avoid current reservation holders and owners feeling like they should have waited?

    Wondering if there is a certain amount of time Tesla should should wait to avoid early adopters feeling buyers remorse. I think Tesla's going to run into the same problem Apple has with their Iphones and Ipads.
  2. bhuwan

    bhuwan Active Member

    Mar 30, 2013
    Boston, MA
    Never. There will always be new features
  3. Stoneymonster

    Stoneymonster Active Member

    Jan 8, 2013
    Aptos, Ca
    Selling more than they can make? Most companies would love to have these problems. Frankly, this is a huge advantage Tesla has: they can make running improvements to car models without waiting for the traditional model year breakpoints. They can also make money retrofitting existing cars with new features if that makes sense.

    There will always be something better within six months. Enjoy what you have and when it's time to get something new, get something new. Waiting another six months means you won't be using it for those six months.
  4. ElSupreme

    ElSupreme Model S 03182

    Jan 13, 2012
    Atlanta, GA

    Well I have two answers that are in some conflict to one another.

    The first answer: As soon as they can. Everyone knows cars get better year after year. The 2013 Model Ss with cloth have heated seats that I don't. The 2014 Model Ss I expect to have more stuff I don't. I bought something I was happy with, I would rather have my car than wait for a slightly better one.

    The second answer: In well documented steps, when fully tested, and in batches. It would become impossible to keep up with changes if you get a tiny one every couple of months. It will make maintenance a headache later on. So Tesla is going to have to get to some sort of 'Model Year' step change system. They could do it on a diferent time scale, and different nomenclature (1.1, 1.2, 1.5, 2.0 ...) but they need to start doing this in some fashion. They also need to test things a little more than they did the original car. The Model S was the first model year, people should expect more problems than buying an established car. Also it was Tesla's first real production car. So even more problems should have been expected. I don't think people will be accepting of small incremental add-ons in the same way they are patient with Tesla on the existing Model S.

    As for people getting upset about their personal computing devices getting much better in 6 months. Well they need to read up on Moore's law. Buying a computer anytime in the past 20 years has had the same thing happen. In 6 months your stupid expensive BA computer somehow looses a lot of luster. Cars do work more slowly, but I expect improvements EVERY model year. And major improvements about every 4-8 years! Think of your car 10 years ago. It happens already you just have to accept it.

    If Tesla came out with a 300kWh car tomorrow for the same price as the S. Sure I would feel stupid for not waiting, but I wouldn't be mad at Tesla.
  5. lolachampcar

    lolachampcar Active Member

    Nov 26, 2012
    WPB Florida
    and then there is the performance package plus more for the 21" wheels amounting to about $10K... Sure makes me smile at my P85 with Pilot shod 21s. Changes are nice but let's not loose sight of value.
  6. neroden

    neroden Happy Model S Owner

    Apr 25, 2011
    Ithaca, NY, USA
    Subtle point here. Any update which can be retrofitted -- such as the defroster -- Tesla should do immediately. I would hope that this would include wipers which are more functional in heavy rain, for example.

    For an update which can't be retrofitted, if it's minor or it's decorative (like the nosecone changing between Signature and Standard) do it as soon as they can, but give people fair warning, in case some people prefer the older version.

    For an update which is new functionality beyond that previously *advertised*, again, it should again be done as soon as possible; people who bought the car without parking sensors knew that they were buying the car without parking sensors, and will not feel too cheated.

    Finally we come to the worrisome case: a major non-retrofittable upgrade which fixes a major functionality issue, where the older cars perform in a less-than-advertised, substandard manner. For instance, suppose the loss of range in cold weather is very substantial in the earlier cars, but they fix this and newer cars have full range in cold weather. If this can't be retrofitted, the buyers of older cars will be *ticked off*, since they got less range than advertised while newer buyers get the advertised range; everything possible should be done to make this retrofittable. If it's been several years, then people might tolerate the change without demanding fixes. If it's only been a few months, however, people will be angry, and people who live in the affected climate should be given replacement cars at no cost.

    Notice how important it is what was advertised. "Setting expectations". If early cars are below advertised quality, and later cars are better, the people who got the early cars deserve fixes. If early cars are at advertised quality, and later cars are better, the people with the early cars don't deserve fixes.

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