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Question on EPA rating

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Rifleman, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. Rifleman

    Rifleman Now owns 2 Model S's!!!

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    Does anyone know if the EPA rating of 265 miles range for the 85 kWh reflects range mode or normal mode?
     
  2. Todd Burch

    Todd Burch Electron Pilot

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    That's in range mode.
     
  3. aviators99

    aviators99 Model S - R140

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    So, about 185.5 in normal mode???
     
  4. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    I understand that charging in standard mode stops at 90% SOC of range mode, equaling 76,5kWh. Driving it to empty should give near 90% of 265 = 238 miles. So I'd say well beyond 200 miles in most everyday driving situations.
     
  5. kevincwelch

    kevincwelch Active Member

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    Question: But, doesn't the discharge stop at about 10% SOC? Or did I misunderstand those battery basics? If it stops around 10% SOC, then range would practically speaking be about 212.
     
  6. strider

    strider Active Member

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    You are correct. Standard holds back both the top and bottom 10%. But if you're in a situation and you need that bottom 10% it's still there, just hidden from you.
     
  7. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    Likey true but it is a simple press of the button to access the bottom part of the battery and it can be done on the fly. So it should be easy to drive the 230 miles.
     
  8. cinergi

    cinergi Active Member

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    No. The Model S does NOT stop at 10%. You can drive to 0% without worry. "Range Mode" for the Model S only refers to charging the top 10% of the battery.
     
  9. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    Yes, this is a recently revealed difference between the Roadster and the Model S.
     
  10. StephRob

    StephRob Member

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    On May 9, Elon and JB wrote a very celebratory blog that said in part: "Model S is expected to achieve 335-240 miles of range during constant-speed highway driving at 50-70 mph . . .One of the points that we feel represents a useful summary of this data is the range at a constant 55 mph under the conditions above. For the 85 kWh Model S this is slightly greater than 300 miles. . . Model S has exceeded our initial range expectations by about 20 miles and has achieved a Roadster equivalent 2-cycle range of 320 miles and a 5-cycle range of 265 miles."

    So I don't understand all this talk of less than 240 miles. If you are driving around 60mph through mild climate conditions (i.e. not cranking the AC), shouldn't you get around 300, if not north of that?
     
  11. GSP

    GSP Member

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    I think the talk is about the EPA 5-cycle range. If it is 265 miles in range mode, it should be 238 miles in standard mode, as posted above by VolkerP.

    Quite good. It should be easy to get 320 miles in range mode with careful driving.

    GSP
     
  12. aviators99

    aviators99 Model S - R140

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  13. gg_got_a_tesla

    gg_got_a_tesla Model S: VIN P65513, Model 3 Res Holder

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    Interesting; thanks!

    So, assuming we'd usually want to charge in Standard mode (to 90%) to be relatively gentle on the battery, at 338 Wh per mile,

    85 kWh pack => 226 miles (85 x 1000 x 0.9 / 338) as Rod and Barbara said.

    60 kWh pack => 159 miles

    40 kWh pack => 106 miles

    And, Rod/Barbara said that it was with moderate acceleration bursts while they test their car out so, with consistently aggressive driving, these could be a tad lower.

    Good to have some real, real world numbers!
     
  14. smorgasbord

    smorgasbord Active Member

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    This is why on the RC Model S cars, switching to Range Mode does not show an increase the miles you can drive, while it does on Roadster.

    Edit: "RC" is not remote control. It's Release Candidate.
     
  15. Norbert

    Norbert TSLA will win

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    #15 Norbert, Aug 5, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
    Although it is interesting to know how much average driving you could do in standard mode if you wanted to, I don't think these are the most relevant numbers. (Except perhaps for the 40 kWh pack.) (EDIT: However, for the 40 kWH pack the weight is probably smaller by a degree that decreases energy consumption, and improves range.)

    I'd expect that on the large packs (maybe the 60 KWh pack is somewhere in between), you are limited by the capacity only when driving on the highway. (As long as you can charge each night, how would you otherwise get up to such a mileage?).

    And on the highway, it seems more important to know what energy consumption is at various (more or less) constant speeds. Of course, once one knows the energy consumption at various constant speeds, one can find out in how much this expectation is correct. For example, it might different if there are lots of hills in the area, or if for some reason one is often changing speeds.

    In any case, I don't think that average driving is very relevant for calculating range. The exception being if you can't charge each night, and actually want to do a lot of average driving.
     
  16. aviators99

    aviators99 Model S - R140

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    The real world data given in that post are relevant as new real world data points that can represent a new maximum range boundary that can be expanded as we get more datapoints. We now know that the car can actually go greater than or equal to 226 miles if you drive it as range-efficiently as possible. To explain: Even though Rod and Barbara did not drive it as range-efficiently as possible, we know it's a number that's achievable. As more data points come in, we can expand that number. But you have to start somewhere.
     

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