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Quick220 Power Supply

Discussion in 'Model X: Battery & Charging' started by ToddS, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. ToddS

    ToddS Member

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    I am considering purchasing the Quick220 Power Supply for a vacation so I can charge quicker than 110v at the house we are renting.

    Does anyone have any experience with these? Are there solutions that are better? I was thinking about purchasing a long extension cord for the 240v dryer outlet, but I really don't know where it is located in the house. Other ideas?
     
  2. JHWJR

    JHWJR Member

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    This device will not assist you.

    While it is possible to create a device that will change 120v to 240v, you get a corresponding drop in current (amperage) by doing so. It's a wash. Additionally, the process takes away some of that current, so you actually do worse using this device. The fact is that a 120v outlet can deliver about 15 amps, and you can't change that by increasing the voltage from 110v to 240v. The amount of total current is the issue and that is not increased in this process.

    So, you need a connection capable of more current. One possibility is to connect to an actual 240 line, which is generally capable of delivering 50 amps, rather than only 15. Older 240 lines were generally only 30 amps of current. These connections have different plugs. (14-30 v. 14-50) You can plug your Tesla adapter into the 14-50 outlet if it reaches. You can get extension cords for that type of connection. They are not cheap, but they are available. Do what you can to get a good one if you go this way, because that is a lot of current and you don't want a poorly constructed cord that can overheat and cause a fire. Tesla discourages doing this for that reason.

    Consider patronizing businesses with commercial grade connections, such as restaurants and local malls during your vacation. Consider an occasional trip to a SuperCharger.

    Do some math and see whether a 110 volt connection might suffice. You will get about 3 miles of range per hour of charge. If your car will tend to sit from 9 p.m. to 9 a.m. most nights, you'll get perhaps 35 miles of range each night. That MIGHT get you through much of this.

    And if this just isn't working out, consider renting an ICE car, painful though that might be.
     
    • Disagree x 3
  3. MasterT

    MasterT Member

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    Todd, do I search of the forum and you'll get quite few threads on the item. IIRC, the majority advise against the contraption because of its limitations: the two plugs of the Quick220 must be plugged in into outlets on different phases AND must not be GFCI protected.

    And if I were you, I would totally disregard @JHWJR post as s/he has absolutely no idea what is being asked.
     
    • Helpful x 1
    • Like x 1
  4. wycolo

    wycolo Active Member

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    > The fact is that a 120v outlet can deliver about 15 amps, and you can't change that by increasing the voltage from 110v to 240v. The amount of total current is the issue and that is not increased in this process. [JHW Jr]

    I = 15A but E doubles to 240V thus W=A*V (or) 15*240=03.6Kw which is not too shabby.
    --
     
  5. JHWJR

    JHWJR Member

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    I would disregard me too, as I did not realize that this is one of the devices that uses TWO 110 outlets, rather than just providing a step up transformer to get a higher voltage. This device has, as MasterT suggests, its own set of concerns.
     
    • Like x 2
  6. Evbwcaer

    Evbwcaer Member

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    Steambrite makes a Power Joiner, which is a competing product, just an FYI there are choices. Never used one but looks well built.
     
  7. KF94563

    KF94563 Member

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    Plugshare. Check the app and you may find there are plenty of charging opportunities nearby. The last time we were far from home I found plenty of EV owners in the area who were more than willing to allow me to stop by and borrow a few electrons.
     
  8. abasile

    abasile Independent Software Eng.

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    I have a Quick220 device, purchased at 110-120 and 220-240 Voltage Converters & Accessories several years ago, that seems to work just fine. We last used it at a couple of my relatives' homes to charge our Nissan LEAF and it sure beat charging at only 120V. The wiring at those homes is older, meaning no GFCI, but in good shape. They just don't happen to have any 240V outlets. The Quick220 has an LED that lights up if plugged into two 120V circuits that are out of phase relative to one another. So I've found it to be fairly user friendly.

    We haven't yet had occasion to use the Quick220 with our Model S, and I probably would not have bothered buying it had the Model S been our first EV, but I carry it with us on trips "just in case" (along with a number of other adapters).
     
  9. carteriii

    carteriii Member

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    I bought the Steambrite model when I thought that would be my only option on one particular trip. I tested it several times at home and it worked "as advertised." For me, it's like an insurance policy. Having said that, as everyone will correctly point out, you absolutely need to know what you're doing to use it, including and perhaps most importantly manually setting your charging current to 12A max (80% of 15A) and perhaps less if you don't trust the house breakers or wiring.
     
    • Informative x 1

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