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Range Loss Over Time, What Can Be Expected, Efficiency, How to Maintain Battery Health

Really how much truth is there to this battery charging nonsense? Don't charge to 100%, dont drain below a certain percent.

What do you think is going to happen to my batteries? Really, anyone have experience with this? I will share my side below, since I think a lot of people out there are scared to even try this for a week. I've done it for a year and driven A LOT.

I have had my Model 3 performance for about 1 year now. Its got 24k on the odometer. Obviously a daily driver.
My charging habits.
Charge to 100% every night (home charger)
Drive it down to whatever it takes to finish the day. Sometimes 10 miles left sometimes 20 miles left sometimes 80 miles left, then back home to the charge to 100% for the next day. Again, EVERY night at my house it plugs in and charges to 100%. I have the $500 tesla wall charger.

When I bought the car I needed those miles because of all my driving. I literally only bought the performance for the extra miles, I would have gladly taken the long range but the wait was too long.

I never realized the games Tesla wants us to play. Only charge to 80% and only run down to 40% or 20% or blah blah blah. If I knew that I would say the car is a bait and switch. So what did I decide to do? Just drive the car and use the car. Like a gas car I fill it up run it to E like a gas car, and like a gas car I've hit the E in my Tesla and driven to the "gas" station with nothing in the tank.

I've brought my tesla down to 0 miles 2 times since I owned it. THIS I avoid if I can because I cant just get some gas and drop it into the tank, I would have to find a plug and sit there for hours. Last time it happened was scary but let me offer up this info to the forum. At 0 MILES I could still drive 4 miles (3.5 at 60 mph on the freeway and .5 to the charger) Again. SCARY on the freeway at 0 miles
However it would be nice to know WHAT I could actually get at zero miles, on my gas cars at E I usually knew 5-10 miles was easy peasy.

Also you might ask. WHY? Why drive this way and not follow the rules by Tesla and some owners advice online....Why? Cause I dont have time to sit back and watch Netflix and chill at chargers around town 2 times a day. I would rather I charge at home. I would rather "destroy" the batteries then spend 20-30 min a day, almost every day, at a charger as to not dip below a certain percentage.

Also, I keep cars for 2-3 years. MAYBE 4. Is any of the above going to matter in the short term (3-4 years)? Will I have to replace the batteries? I dont know. I just dont. There is so much rhetoric and battery virtue signaling its hard to tell whats real. Hence this post.

What I CAN tell you is the car works the same as the day I bought it, charges the same, and same basic range since the day I bought it. So no noticeable battery issues from my habits....so far 1 year in and 24k.
Your post pretty well describes the approach I took with my electric motorcycle, especially the running it down to zero bit. And for me this was again in violation of sound advice I was getting off Internet forums about lithium batteries. I actually wrecked the motorcycle after about 3 years, and at the point I wrecked it there was definitely some degradation of the batteries. The motorcycle started out with about 60 miles of range, which I proved a couple of times (One time I had to sit with it plugged in at a gas station for an hour or so until it had enough juice to get me home.). I’d guess the range by the time I wrecked it was around 50-55.

I guess you have to separate out the science from the overall goals you’re trying to achieve. Because I’m really confident that all that advice about not emptying out the tank and not leaving the tank full for too long is all science-based legitimate advice. On the other hand, I would bet that though you lose a few miles of range over the course of 4 years, it’s not like the car will be shot at that point, or even close to being shot. My guess, though, is that if you re-sell the car, a careful buyer would either turn his back on it or knock the price down. Not the end of the universe or anything. But if that happens, I would be the last to try to claim that you didn’t get your money’s worth out of your use of the car. It’s more like with a used ICE, would you rather buy one from the little old lady who only drove it to church on Sundays, or the rip-roaring maniac who was trying to set the world’s record for doing do-nuts on city streets?

I hope you‘re willing to stop in every once in a while and give folks an idea of how your range is doing as time goes on. Sometimes people can get too far into this-is-bad-and-this-is-good mode, and what you can offer is some actual numbers showing how bad (or good) this style of using the car is, and a more accurate idea of how this affects its capability and value.
 
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Also, I keep cars for 2-3 years. MAYBE 4. Is any of the above going to matter in the short term (3-4 years)? Will I have to replace the batteries? I dont know. I just dont. There is so much rhetoric and battery virtue signaling its hard to tell whats real. Hence this post.

What I CAN tell you is the car works the same as the day I bought it, charges the same, and same basic range since the day I bought it. So no noticeable battery issues from my habits....so far 1 year in and 24k.

It isn't 'rhetoric' or 'virtue signaling', or emotion here. It's attempting to translate independently discovered scientific results into practical implications for people to use.

It's clear that if you need to charge every day to 100% and you run it down, you drive very significantly every day. Which means that the amount of time spent at 100% is probably low, as soon as it gets there you need to drive in a short time period and it goes back down. This is better for the battery than sitting at 100% for any significant length of time. Even still, if you lowered the max to 95% that would lower degradation. Or if you made sure that the 100% was achieved immediately before you travel using scheduled departure so the time at high SOC is minimized.

The battery will probably not be damaged in a major way--which I define as catastrophic failure. You will have more degradation than people who drive less and keep the battery max at a lower percent SOC at most of the time. It's unlikely to need full replacement because of major degradation.

Personally, if I were at the edge of the range and needed the full range on a day, which you seem to, I would change the wheels and tires to a more efficient setup (lower diameter wheel and efficiency tire) than the default Performance setup. The wheels will be sellable too.

BTW, 24K miles in a year is significant but not using full range every day: 250 miles * 365 = 91k. So still the direction is to avoid charging to 100% and letting it sit there, as that will definitely enhance degradation vs alternatives, particularly if it is hot.

If you plan to sell in a few years, the state of health of a battery is a primary concern for any buyer obviously so I would still work to enhance the battery lifetime.

I would rather "destroy" the batteries then spend 20-30 min a day, almost every day, at a charger as to not dip below a certain percentage.
The scientific results that have been discussed here show that avoiding the low state of charge is not necessary or helpful for batteries and people who tell you to do that are wrong. So you are correct in not doing constant recharges to avoid low state of charge during your driving day.

( It's only maybe storage at 0% for a long time weeks/months which might hurt with self-discharge, but maybe not). As I've written above, avoiding holding at high state of charge times the time at that SOC is most important. If you can make it from 90% to 2% every day, then that's fine.
 
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We need to define how we measure the voltage or know that we use the same or different reference.

Theres only one solid defined voltage for a specific SOC, thats the OCV. With no load on the battery the voltage creeps up to the defined value after a period of rest.

Driving the car lowers the voltage depending on the power output. In Park after a drive the voltage is also lower due to the not yet recovered voltage and the load from the car in park.

At all loads the cell voltage bogs down and the bog varies with cell temp, load history etc.

View attachment 809736
This is a OVC voltage chart for a NCA cell (Panasonic 18650, I think).

Tesla on screen SOC is slightly lower than true SOC, due to the buffer below 0%.



I have a lot of screen dumps from SMT.
A couple of weeks since new:
3.82 average cell voltage when the car had been standing parked in the garage for about 5-6 hours, 54.72% SOC.
Not OVC, because the contactors close when unlocking the car.

After my regular 55% charges (thats about 57% true SOC) I can see the cell voltage 3.84v after the voltage drops from the charging session when using the log data of teslalogger.
Just now with 0,15kW load
1653853429137.png
 
Really how much truth is there to this battery charging nonsense? Don't charge to 100%, dont drain below a certain percent.

What do you think is going to happen to my batteries?
More degradation than someone who only charges to 50% for daily use for sure. But...
Also, I keep cars for 2-3 years. MAYBE 4. Is any of the above going to matter in the short term (3-4 years)?
It probably won't matter. If whoever buys it doesn't check for degradation, it might not even affect the resale value. If the car is owned by Tesla (you're leasing it), then it REALLY doesn't matter. The battery is a consumable component. Some people's charging habits are harder on the batteries than others, but I wouldn't consider your usage pattern to be "abuse", if you actually need all of that range.
Will I have to replace the batteries?
Probably not.
What I CAN tell you is the car works the same as the day I bought it, charges the same, and same basic range since the day I bought it. So no noticeable battery issues from my habits....so far 1 year in and 24k.
The only thing I'd be worried about, assuming you're not planning on keeping the car beyond 2-3 years, is that if you are barely making it back with range in the low double digits, is that degradation will make it where you won't be able to even do all of the driving your currently do after 2-3 years. To reduce degradation, I'd (1) use the scheduled charging feature and set it to finish about an hour before you depart each day, so that the time spent at 100% is minimized, and (2) set the limit lower if there are any days of the week you won't be driving as many miles, so that it doesn't sit close to 100% for a good portion of those days.
 
It's clear that if you need to charge every day to 100% and you run it down, you drive very significantly every day. Which means that the amount of time spent at 100% is probably low, as soon as it gets there you need to drive in a short time period and it goes back down. This is better for the battery than sitting at 100% for any significant length of time. Even still, if you lowered the max to 95% that would lower degradation. Or if you made sure that the 100% was achieved immediately before you travel using scheduled departure so the time at high SOC is minimized.

The battery will probably not be damaged in a major way--which I define as catastrophic failure. You will have more degradation than people who drive less and keep the battery max at a lower percent SOC at most of the time. It's unlikely to need full replacement because of major degradation.

Even if big cycles wear more than small ones, the degradation from this still is way outperformed from calendar aging.

We have a guy with a M3P 2021, (same as mine) at a swedish EV forum that drives 250km highway back and forth every day. he charges to 90% and arrives home with around 10%.
Two months ago the car was at 69K km (43K Miles) and he still have about the same numbers as most other M3P on the forum that have very low miles but use 70-80% daily charging.
This guy arrives with about 10% and it sits with 10% until it needs to start charging to have 90% just before the next days drive. The car never stands long time with high SOC.

Nogo.png


This is my Teslafi degradation page, "Nogos" number at 69K km put in as a point at the two month ago value and a straight line. He was initially worried that the car would not hold up for his three years of planned use, but after some posts etc. he relaxed, I think he is quite happy now.

[Edit]Checked with Nogo, now 79K km and 90% charge shows 418km, indicates 464km range at 100%.

( It's only maybe storage at 0% for a long time weeks/months which might hurt with self-discharge, but maybe not). As I've written above, avoiding holding at high state of charge times the time at that SOC is most important. If you can make it from 90% to 2% every day, then that's fine.

Exactly.

Low _SOC is safe. A single cell, or a bettery pack disconnected from comsumers will not have a noticable self discharge. That is the reason that make it possible to store Lithium Ion batterys for long time at 0% SOC (note: not completely discharged, but at the minimum specified voltage set by the manufacturer. In the Tesla li ion case, 2.5 Volt per cell.

But in a car like a Tesla the battery will discharge from consumers that the 12v battery serve, and that get charged by the lithiumion battery.
So in the end, the lithium battery will safely be disconnected by the contactors, causing the 12v battery to drain and get damaged. Lead Acid batteries do not like to get discharged (opposite to lithium ion batteries).

That said, the self discharge/car usage of energy for a car that have sentry disabled and no external apps disturbing the sleep use very little energy/day.
I regularly leave my car for about a week at my job and I actually see the same SOC when firing it up after the week. I use teslafi and teslalogger but these do not disturb my car so my car sleeps more than a day each time, sometimes two or three days.
Tesla say to count with 1% per day, but that is most certain with a big margin to the real life drain.

Yes, one more thing: self drain is higher with higher SOC. When we look a the battery self drain and not the car usage of energy.
This is probably on of the things that make my car not loose any noticable SOC during a week.
 
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It isn't 'rhetoric' or 'virtue signaling', or emotion here. It's attempting to translate independently discovered scientific results into practical implications for people to use.



BTW, 24K miles in a year is significant but not using full range every day: 250 miles * 365 = 91k. So still the direction is to avoid charging to 100% and letting it sit there, as that will definitely enhance degradation vs alternatives, particularly if it is hot.
The reason I say "virtue signaling" is someone posted to the forum asking how far he can take it at 0 miles (I dont have it set to %) and I was interested in this too since I wondered how long I really had that day to get to a charger before it shut down on me in the middle of freeway traffic. So as I sat at the charger. Hands trembling since it was a close one! I got on these forums to find out...what range did I have at 0 miles

Some responses were helpful in trying to answer that question but most responses were " I would never do that" IE - How dare you?

As far as the milage I rechecked I have had it for 11 months and 3 of those months I had a loaner while tesla was getting me a replacement part. So really I have been driving this car for 8 months.

To clear up my home charging habits:

I get home later in the day. Plug it in and its scheduled to charge at night (to save $$$) and ready by 8am. I usually depart around then if not then by 9am. If I am departing at 6am I set it to 6am.
 

Bouba

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Sep 23, 2021
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France
The reason I say "virtue signaling" is someone posted to the forum asking how far he can take it at 0 miles (I dont have it set to %) and I was interested in this too since I wondered how long I really had that day to get to a charger before it shut down on me in the middle of freeway traffic. So as I sat at the charger. Hands trembling since it was a close one! I got on these forums to find out...what range did I have at 0 miles

Some responses were helpful in trying to answer that question but most responses were " I would never do that" IE - How dare you?

As far as the milage I rechecked I have had it for 11 months and 3 of those months I had a loaner while tesla was getting me a replacement part. So really I have been driving this car for 8 months.

To clear up my home charging habits:

I get home later in the day. Plug it in and its scheduled to charge at night (to save $$$) and ready by 8am. I usually depart around then if not then by 9am. If I am departing at 6am I set it to 6am.
When people say they would never do that....it’s because they don’t want to stop in the middle of the freeway...not because they are telling you off.
It’s your battery to do as you please...but as in everything in life there is best practice....by adhering to a few simple rules (which aren’t rules, they are voluntary) you can preserve your battery....just like a careful owner would treat his gas car well and his dog even better
 
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When people say they would never do that....it’s because they don’t want to stop in the middle of the freeway...not because they are telling you off.
It’s your battery to do as you please...but as in everything in life there is best practice....by adhering to a few simple rules (which aren’t rules, they are voluntary) you can preserve your battery....just like a careful owner would treat his gas car well and his dog even better
Thanks for making my point
 
The reason I say "virtue signaling" is someone posted to the forum asking how far he can take it at 0 miles (I dont have it set to %) and I was interested in this too since I wondered how long I really had that day to get to a charger before it shut down on me in the middle of freeway traffic. So as I sat at the charger. Hands trembling since it was a close one! I got on these forums to find out...what range did I have at 0 miles
Why don't you gather the data if no one else has it and share it with us? I had to do this with one of my cars (pure ICE model) because I couldn't find any info on this. So I carried a gas can around in the trunk and drove it for over 50 miles after the low fuel warning light came on.

Carry your UMC, appropriate adapters, and a generator in the trunk. Find a road without a lot of traffic, and drive until the car stops moving. Record how many miles you're able to go past 0, then when the car dies, plug in the UMC and start the generator. Charge it enough to get to the nearest SC site.
 
A new paper on modeling calendar aging of batteries:

settings Open AccessArticle Calendar Aging of Li-Ion Cells—Experimental Investigation and Empirical Correlation

Some of it is not surprising: the very strong negative influence of high temperatures, and the negative effect of higher state of charge.

The key result in the model in equations 4-8. The main interesting result is that the assumption of aging as a square root of time is not a preferred model, and that a better model is an exponential (important at early times) added to a linear degradation. That's equation 4.

That's somewhat bad news in that longer term the linear degradation is worse than a square root, but the linear part isn't discovered until the exponential has been made unimportant.

The slope of the linear effect (\gamma(SOC,T)), equation 8. has a dependence on SOC. Note the "exp()" terms on right hand side multiplying all coefficients in equations 5-8. Those are the temperature effects: high temperature makes everything worse for degradation.

The SOC effect on the exponential term is more complex than the linear term (5) vs (8). That's a cubic which in figure 5 results in two maximums. Note also the figures are at pretty high temperatures (40 degrees C is very warm for continuous battery temperature). It's faster to get degradation results at high temperatures because everything happens faster.
 

Not that new, I've already refered to that before :)

First of all, they might have a small point with the formula for calendar aging.

Second, other tests of calendar aging show other data, and in many cases it follows the "square root of time" very good.

Third, the difference between their formula and our "square root of time" is not that big. For our amateur calculations I think the square root works very well.

( I did a backwards BMS calib. recently to try to set my BMS from full range to to reflect the actual battery capacity. I think it worked, and now I have about 79kWh capacity according to my BMS. That is very close to my "square root of time" calcs. Using my logged data of average SOC and average temp I should have around 2.6% calendar aging now. The cycles should have worn around1% by now. This should put my battery capacity at around 79.1kWh if I calculate from 82.1 as the new pack number(once did show 82.0 nominal). My BMS calib put it at 79.0, and also a 0% to 100% charge one week ago indicated both 79.0 nominal and also the difference in nominal remaning was spot on. (79kWh -3.5(buffer))

I do not think the above is a coincidence.

Some of it is not surprising: the very strong negative influence of high temperatures, and the negative effect of higher state of charge.

The key result in the model in equations 4-8. The main interesting result is that the assumption of aging as a square root of time is not a preferred model, and that a better model is an exponential (important at early times) added to a linear degradation. That's equation 4.

That's somewhat bad news in that longer term the linear degradation is worse than a square root, but the linear part isn't discovered until the exponential has been made unimportant.

The slope of the linear effect (\gamma(SOC,T)), equation 8. has a dependence on SOC. Note the "exp()" terms on right hand side multiplying all coefficients in equations 5-8. Those are the temperature effects: high temperature makes everything worse for degradation.

The SOC effect on the exponential term is more complex than the linear term (5) vs (8). That's a cubic which in figure 5 results in two maximums. Note also the figures are at pretty high temperatures (40 degrees C is very warm for continuous battery temperature). It's faster to get degradation results at high temperatures because everything happens faster.

There is a tendency for reserachers to use very high ambient temperatures and then draw conclusions like "we accelerated the calendar aging so each week was like one moth(or year).
In reality very high temperature (specially together with high SOC) kills the batteries. This makes the usual square root of time formula look bad, but when we look at researchers that use reasonable temperature, they do not get that behavoiur. The same is valid for using too high C-rate for charge/discharge cycles.
If you look very closely at the graphs you see that the linear part in their graphs actually show that the test points actually do show a not linear line but the curved line that fit the square root quite good. Also, from my point of view they stopped the test very very early in the "linear part". Way to early to make their statement clear.
There is an older report out trying to find a better formula than "square root of time". If I find it, I'll post the link later.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
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I am not getting anywhere near the mileage that the model 3 long range is supported to get.

Could I somehow have the incorrect battery.

Does anyone know how the difference in the dimensions of the model 3 vs model 3 long range?

No, its not possible you got "the incorrect battery". You can calculate what your car thinks the battery capacity is with the information in the stickied thread here:


As for "I am not getting anywhere near the mileage" that discussion is in this long 250+ page thread I moved your newly created thread to. Without you even providing any additional information, I can tell you that it is 99.9999999% likely your car has the correct battery, and is performing normally. You can read through some of this thread to see why I say that.
 
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Not that new, I've already refered to that before :)

First of all, they might have a small point with the formula for calendar aging.

Second, other tests of calendar aging show other data, and in many cases it follows the "square root of time" very good.

Third, the difference between their formula and our "square root of time" is not that big. For our amateur calculations I think the square root works very well.

( I did a backwards BMS calib. recently to try to set my BMS from full range to to reflect the actual battery capacity. I think it worked, and now I have about 79kWh capacity according to my BMS. That is very close to my "square root of time" calcs. Using my logged data of average SOC and average temp I should have around 2.6% calendar aging now. The cycles should have worn around1% by now. This should put my battery capacity at around 79.1kWh if I calculate from 82.1 as the new pack number(once did show 82.0 nominal). My BMS calib put it at 79.0, and also a 0% to 100% charge one week ago indicated both 79.0 nominal and also the difference in nominal remaning was spot on. (79kWh -3.5(buffer))

I do not think the above is a coincidence.



There is a tendency for reserachers to use very high ambient temperatures and then draw conclusions like "we accelerated the calendar aging so each week was like one moth(or year).
In reality very high temperature (specially together with high SOC) kills the batteries. This makes the usual square root of time formula look bad, but when we look at researchers that use reasonable temperature, they do not get that behavoiur. The same is valid for using too high C-rate for charge/discharge cycles.
If you look very closely at the graphs you see that the linear part in their graphs actually show that the test points actually do show a not linear line but the curved line that fit the square root quite good. Also, from my point of view they stopped the test very very early in the "linear part". Way to early to make their statement clear.
There is an older report out trying to find a better formula than "square root of time". If I find it, I'll post the link later.

great info. Of course 1-a*(exp(-t)-1) - b*t can be approximated at early time intervals by 1-c*sqrt(t) Or lots of functions.

You're right that in longer time intervals the physics and results aren't clear for calendar aging in the regime that we would care about, such as 20 degrees C for 10 years. Extrapolation isn't fully valid when all the basic mechanisms aren't fully understood.

What matters is if there is a clear physical principle underlying calendar aging which means that the long term degradation is less than linear or is it linear, and the answer will come from chemistry experiments not curve fitting. Panasonic might know but they aren't telling.
 
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Steve446

Dusty Crophopper, M3 LR 2021 Midnight Silver
great info. Of course 1-a*(exp(-t)-1) - b*t can be approximated at early time intervals by 1-c*sqrt(t) Or lots of functions.

You're right that in longer time intervals the physics and results aren't clear for calendar aging in the regime that we would care about, such as 20 degrees C for 10 years. Extrapolation isn't fully valid when all the basic mechanisms aren't fully understood.

What matters is if there is a clear physical principle underlying calendar aging which means that the long term degradation is less than linear or is it linear, and the answer will come from chemistry experiments not curve fitting. Panasonic might know but they aren't telling.
Agh... with all your posts I will have to brush up my math(s) o_O The publications do show I imagine the worst case scenarios for battery degradation but, as has been mentioned by @AAKEE, by skipping over testing at lower temperatures, so far we have few hard data about the best conditions for longevity in the 0-20°C range. Excepting that is the experience from drivers in, on average, cool or cold areas.
 

Steve446

Dusty Crophopper, M3 LR 2021 Midnight Silver
If you look very closely at the graphs you see that the linear part in their graphs actually show that the test points actually do show a not linear line but the curved line that fit the square root quite good. Also, from my point of view they stopped the test very very early in the "linear part". Way to early to make their statement clear.
What matters is if there is a clear physical principle underlying calendar aging which means that the long term degradation is less than linear or is it linear, and the answer will come from chemistry experiments not curve fitting. Panasonic might know but they aren't telling.
Have I misunderstood or is it my math neuron needing a reboot? The degradation "curve" from my battery appears biphasic when plotting NFP. Is this normal physical-chemical process or might it be influenced by following a more rigorous low SoC storage (~35% average) and charge to use, from when I got SMT in January? Average monthly battery cell mid temperature17.5 to 26°C. Or is it just as likely to be something else? Just curious!
Battery is an LG M48 NMC.

Max Rated Range and Nominal Full Pack (SMT) Vs Time.png
 
Have I misunderstood or is it my math neuron needing a reboot? The degradation "curve" from my battery appears biphasic when plotting NFP. Is this normal physical-chemical process or might it be influenced by following a more rigorous low SoC storage (~35% average) and charge to use, from when I got SMT in January? Average monthly battery cell mid temperature17.5 to 26°C. Or is it just as likely to be something else? Just curious!
Battery is an LG M48 NMC.

View attachment 810533
The BMS guess the capacity, and it is no better than the software values put into the computer. This should not be mixed with the real capacity loss and the real degradation.
Lithium batteries in our cars will only change the real capacity in one way:
- Downwards!

The BMS calculation is affected by a lot of things, causing the range to go up and down.
You also can see that the NFP is more solid than the estimated range. The estimated range (estimated by teslafi or SMT?) seems to vary a lot more than the NFP.
This is because the app or teslafi etc makes an own calculation of the 100% range. This is not a true Tesla value and it vary despite tha fact that the NFP is not varying, so estimated range by an app or teslafi should be taken with a grain of salt.
Disregard short term variations from those range calcs. Use only NFP if you have that value. NFP is not exact but vary much less. Still, this is not true capacity as the capacity only really goes down, never up.

Down below: a period when my NFP was rock solid, no more than 0.2 kWh difference(mostly none). The 80.4-80.6kWh should mean a true range of 506-507km.
Teslafi shows 497-505 km mostly and a lot of variations despite the same NFP.
48A8390B-22D3-4388-B946-8D1AE2528941.jpeg
 
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( I did a backwards BMS calib. recently to try to set my BMS from full range to to reflect the actual battery capacity. I think it worked, and now I have about 79kWh capacity according to my BMS. That is very close to my "square root of time" calcs. Using my logged data of average SOC and average temp I should have around 2.6% calendar aging now. The cycles should have worn around1% by now. This should put my battery capacity at around 79.1kWh if I calculate from 82.1 as the new pack number(once did show 82.0 nominal). My BMS calib put it at 79.0, and also a 0% to 100% charge one week ago indicated both 79.0 nominal and also the difference in nominal remaning was spot on. (79kWh -3.5(buffer))
Have you left the car sleeping to invoke OCV when at 100%? Or you drove it directly to under 55%.
And when at 0% have you left the car sleeping some hour?
 
I've done it for a year and driven A LOT.
To compare, I did drive about 20,5 K mi the first year. No appearent loss of range during the first 12 months.
Now after 17 months I read about 498km/ 310 mi on a full charge, 42K km/ 26k mi.

I did 20,5K in the first year and used 55% as daily charge. Most days 35% SOC would have been enough with a good margin to run ouf of juice.

I have had my Model 3 performance for about 1 year now. Its got 24k on the odometer. Obviously a daily driver.

My charging habits.
Charge to 100% every night (home charger)
Drive it down to whatever it takes to finish the day. Sometimes 10 miles left sometimes 20 miles left sometimes 80 miles left, then back home to the charge to 100% for the next day. Again, EVERY night at my house it plugs in and charges to 100%. I have the $500 tesla wall charger.
I use the Tesla WC as well.

If you charge to 100% you will increase the wear of the battery. Both calendar aging willb e higher if it stands at 100%, and the cyclic aging will be higher due to high SOC.

It would be interresting to se your range at 100% SOC( the rangemeter selectable at the battery). It is very probable that your range is considerably lower than the new car range, and lower than mine.
Is it posdible to get an picture of that when just charged to 100% ?

There is no expectation at all that the battery would brake down from one year of 100% SOC but the wear/degradation is probably noticeble.
 

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