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Rear Camber arms option - Hardrace

Hi All,
I've just finished installing my hardrace links at 290mm. They're the right way up (curve Down), the adjuster is outboard, I tensioned the bolts with suspension on the ground at STD height.
And the back suspension is now about 40mm lower than the front....
I drove the suspenion up and down, and all that is working but still differant by 40~mm.
Any thoughts? FYI, I don't have toolbox...
Thanks
Did you install the lever arm for the sensor pointing down? As posted before:
 
After much money and time spent, I now have the alignment that will horrify many people in the rear of my car: darn near straight axle highway bomber/cruiser :)
 

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@GBYMB - The only thing that controls ride height is the angle of those sensors. You don't need to re-calibrate after install if it was done right. I suggest you look a bit more carefully at your install against some of the pictures in this thread,
thanks for the reply, yep my install is the same as the pix in the posts. I ddnt touch the sensor, just unbolted from the link. bugger. I guess you meani need a toolbox calibration?.....tesla service...
 
well....Tesla wont touch it...bugger.
ok, Have any of you guru's seen an adjustable version of the little plastic ball to ball rod? Which is on the adjustment sensor.
I think I've seen something somewhere..
Sure, there are many topics about that
But you should not need it..
 
Sure, there are many topics about that
But you should not need it..
I agree, I've fixed the camber problem, now I just want standard height to work. I can set the suspension to high... the back is now standard height and the front is high...tesla wont touch it, and I cant get a subscription to Toolbox, in Oz.
Now , I'm looking at fooling the sensor, I'm a bit frustated.
 
That is really not normal and should not be needed. Lowering links are just that, they allow you to lower your car but can’t make it higher. Lowering is achieved by making the link longer, normally there is no way to make them shorter. Sometimes it’s possible to lower, but just a tiny bit, older n2itive could and some of the lesser quality ones can be shortened.
 
That is really not normal and should not be needed. Lowering links are just that, they allow you to lower your car but can’t make it higher. Lowering is achieved by making the link longer, normally there is no way to make them shorter. Sometimes it’s possible to lower, but just a tiny bit, older n2itive could and some of the lesser quality ones can be shortened.
That's exactly what I'm aiming at. The ball linkages are similar to the ones in Hydraulic actuator links. I'm planning to make my own to add about 30mm to the rear, when in standard height.
I found this on a Lowering linkage listing "Rule of thumb, a 5mm longer length for the front represent a 1” drop on the chassis on the front wheels. For the rear, a 5mm shorter link represents a 1” drop on the rear chassis on the rear wheels."
I'm going to make a 7mm longer link....maybe it'll raise the rear by ~30mm, after I repower the car... I hope.
 
Well... I decided to check out the link I was going to manufacture........
20221109_195409.jpg

I apologise for wasting everybodys time by insisting that all was as it should be.
I was in too much of a hurry.

The car must have been soooo confused.

For those who cant see it, the actuator arm of the sensor should be pointing down, not up like mine.

I reset the link, took the car for a drive to get out of jack mode, pumped the suspension to high and back a few times and its all good.
Again, Thanks all for saying over and over 'this really isn't normal'.🤪
 
Well... I decided to check out the link I was going to manufacture........
View attachment 872822
I apologise for wasting everybodys time by insisting that all was as it should be.
I was in too much of a hurry.

The car must have been soooo confused.

For those who cant see it, the actuator arm of the sensor should be pointing down, not up like mine.

I reset the link, took the car for a drive to get out of jack mode, pumped the suspension to high and back a few times and its all good.
Again, Thanks all for saying over and over 'this really isn't normal'.🤪
All is well that ends well!
 
I reset the link, took the car for a drive to get out of jack mode, pumped the suspension to high and back a few times and its all good.
Again, Thanks all for saying over and over 'this really isn't normal'.🤪

Glad to hear that...between you and the other guy who had said he had to drill new holes (then realized he was talking about the front...) you guys are scaring me!

Anyone in the US need a set of Camber Arms??? If so, go here.
 

dustinfl

Member
Supporting Member
Aug 11, 2021
27
38
Florida
Well... I decided to check out the link I was going to manufacture........
View attachment 872822
I apologise for wasting everybodys time by insisting that all was as it should be.
I was in too much of a hurry.

The car must have been soooo confused.

For those who cant see it, the actuator arm of the sensor should be pointing down, not up like mine.

I reset the link, took the car for a drive to get out of jack mode, pumped the suspension to high and back a few times and its all good.
Again, Thanks all for saying over and over 'this really isn't normal'.🤪
Thank you for sharing this, it seems like something that could fly under the radar pretty easily if we're trying to get them installed too quickly.
 
he Hardrace lop links were adjusted to 290mm which put the wheel camber close to 0,0mm.
The toe , however, is at 6mm toe in. The cams are max'd out. I'll be buying some adjustable toe links today.
Most people don't try to run zero camber.
If you run around 0.5 degrees, you can usually get away with the stock toe adjustment system.
 

Aggmeister2010

Active Member
Dec 26, 2018
1,228
1,100
TX
Most people don't try to run zero camber.
If you run around 0.5 degrees, you can usually get away with the stock toe adjustment system.

Agreed, it's quite rare to run "true zero" on all settings. And doing so will make the car wiggle around quite a bit more....as in, you'll require a lot of micro-corrections. And when you corner fast, you won't feel as stable....because the car uses negative camber to push the full contact surface into a corner.

I run -1.2 degrees of camber front and rear, with a bit of toe out in the front and a bit of toe in in the rear. Keeps it running straight, and still handles well.
 
Agreed, it's quite rare to run "true zero" on all settings. And doing so will make the car wiggle around quite a bit more....as in, you'll require a lot of micro-corrections. And when you corner fast, you won't feel as stable....because the car uses negative camber to push the full contact surface into a corner.

You are conflating toe and camber, and over-estimating what camber feels like. These are not the reasons to not run zero camber.
It's kind of funny that you are worried about a car needing micro-corrections when this is exactly what front toe out causes. If you want heavier, more stable steering, you want toe in on both axles.
 

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