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Refresh Model S real world range

DelPhonic1

Member
Mar 20, 2020
170
167
Burbank
Anyone have any comparisons of the refresh Model S real world range versus the previous Raven model S range? Does the new refresh heat pump show off in cold climes? Is the 20 mile or so 'buffer' still there when the percentage reaches 0? I'm hoping some sandbagging went on when it comes to the refresh range...
 

jeremymc7

Active Member
Feb 3, 2013
1,526
691
U.S.
The heat pump in colder climates definitely helps. Being in Los Angeles though and as a person that loves AC, even in winter, I prefer my non heat pump model.
 

jeremymc7

Active Member
Feb 3, 2013
1,526
691
U.S.
There are pockets in the US that are high fourties to low fifties But yeah. Not enough time for a proper cycle compare. But there are conclusions that be made on Models 3 with and without heat pumps. They’re been shipping longer.
 

DelPhonic1

Member
Mar 20, 2020
170
167
Burbank
It’s July and the only people to take delivery did so in the past few weeks in North America. How do you expect anyone to answer this?
Tons of people have been posting their experiences with the plaid and long range, already. I'd love to hear from them. Surely some have driven more than 400 miles. If not I can wait.
 

DBV1

Member
May 11, 2020
271
241
Amherst, OH
Tons of people have been posting their experiences with the plaid and long range, already. I'd love to hear from them. Surely some have driven more than 400 miles. If not I can wait.

Agree with you. You would think there would be more talk about real world range, as it is one of the points of an EV vehicle. Hopefully, current new owners will start posting that. Would be great to hear, as my Model S delivery date continues to be blank.
 
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NOLA21SGuy

Member
Jan 25, 2021
211
553
New Orleans, Louisiana
Today I picked up my MSLR in Nashville, TN and drove it 551 miles to New Orleans, LA. I'm not sure why I thought it was a 450 mile drive originally. The route consisted of a supercharger stop in Birmingham, AL, and another supercharger stop in Meridian, MS. I experienced traffic throughout almost the entire first leg, hilly areas, 88-92 degrees in the sun, lower 80s and overcast, and several torrential downpours that lowered the temperature to 75 degrees. I had the car set to chill mode, comfort steering, and comfort suspension. I had the AC set on 67 and a fan speed between 3 and 5. I used the driver's side heat warmer for the majority of the drive. I had music on and set at 5 to 8 range while testing various music. I tried the sound system with classical piano, orchestral music, acapella, techno, rock, metal, rap, pop, and some classic rock. The sound system was amazing for all of it. Feel free to prompt if there are any other settings you are curious about.

At pickup, in Nashville, TN, I had 87% charge and 17 miles on the odometer.
I drove 181 miles to Birmingham, AL through hill country. Weather was overcast, mid 80s with some mist and a little light rain. Traffic on I65 was normal, which is to say bad. It was difficult to keep the car in autopilot both because I was excited, and because of the traffic. I drove 78-85 miles per hour for large stretches. There was intermixed stop and go traffic and some complete stops. At the end of the 181 miles, I had 23% charge remaining.

PXL_20210717_184420099.jpg


After supercharging and grabbing some food in Birmingham, AL, I had 86% charge.
I drove 149 miles from there to Meridian, MS through some more hilly areas. I tried to use autopilot a lot more on this leg, but at about the midpoint I experienced heavy rainfall. The rain lasted beyond what I trusted autopilot to handle until around the Mississippi state line. I had autopilot set to 78 miles per hour when I could use it, and went anywhere from 35-65 miles per hour in the rain. Overall average was probably 55 for the rain and 78 for the rest. Unfortunately, I did not grab a picture of the trip for this part of the journey. At the end of 149 miles, I had 34% battery remaining.

After supercharging and a quick bio break in Meridian, MS, I had 90% charge.
I drove the final 221 miles to my house in New Orleans. From Meridian to New Orleans had only some minor hilly terrain. Much less than the first two legs. The rain had subsided by this point, and the sun was getting low. The temperature was low 80s. There was almost no traffic until I got into the outskirts of New Orleans, so I was able to do the entire first 180 miles on autopilot set at 78 miles per hour. It isn't advisable to use cruise control of any sort in New Orleans, so I did my best to keep my speed consistent at 78 for all of the manual driving portions at the end. I arrived at home with 14% charge remaining.

PXL_20210718_010355162.jpg


Overall, the drive was extremely relaxing. I didn't make any attempt to get extra range out of the car because the distance between superchargers made it unreasonable to skip either Birmingham, or Meridian. I had a little bit of a led foot for the first leg, but never exceeded 95, and only got that high one time. It is quite easy to go with the flow of traffic and find yourself doing 88 without realizing it. The car is quiet, comfortable, easy to drive, and hugs the road well. I had no issues whatsoever with the yoke, finding the buttons consistently, 3 point turns, using blinkers, using the menu, finding little shortcuts, etc. I found the car quite intuitive and well designed. Fit and finish was also great, though there was one little access panel behind the passenger wheel which I had to have them close and pin before I left Nashville.

PXL_20210718_010355162(1).jpg



LocationArrival ChargeDeparture ChargeDistanceTotal EnergyAvg. Energy
Nashville, TN87%181 mi59 kWh329 Wh/mi
Birmingham, AL23%86%149 mi52 kWh349 Wh/mi
Meridian, MS34%90%221 mi71 kWh322 Wh/mi
New Orleans, LA14%
Total551 mi182 kWh330 Wh/mi
 

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DBV1

Member
May 11, 2020
271
241
Amherst, OH
Overall, the drive was extremely relaxing. I didn't make any attempt to get extra range out of the car because the distance between superchargers made it unreasonable to skip either Birmingham, or Meridian. I had a little bit of a led foot for the first leg, but never exceeded 95, and only got that high one time. It is quite easy to go with the flow of traffic and find yourself doing 88 without realizing it. The car is quiet, comfortable, easy to drive, and hugs the road well. I had no issues whatsoever with the yoke, finding the buttons consistently, 3 point turns, using blinkers, using the menu, finding little shortcuts, etc. I found the car quite intuitive and well designed. Fit and finish was also great, though there was one little access panel behind the passenger wheel which I had to have them close and pin before I left Nashville.


Thanks for the great/detailed write up. I never realized the range would be cut back that drastically when driving what I consider normal for the way I drive and use my BMW. Sounds like it is a great car, but your posts/stats are making me reconsider my order, as not I travel a lot and not sure I could stop every couple to three hours to charge.

You car looks awesome!
 

NOLA21SGuy

Member
Jan 25, 2021
211
553
New Orleans, Louisiana
Thanks for the great/detailed write up. I never realized the range would be cut back that drastically when driving what I consider normal for the way I drive and use my BMW. Sounds like it is a great car, but your posts/stats are making me reconsider my order, as not I travel a lot and not sure I could stop every couple to three hours to charge.

You car looks awesome!
I was able to travel 550 miles in 9 hours and 3 minutes without ever charging to 100% or going below 14%. I felt it was rather successful. There were also lots of hills involved for more than half of the trip and serious rain for over an hour.
 

DBV1

Member
May 11, 2020
271
241
Amherst, OH
I was able to travel 550 miles in 9 hours and 3 minutes without ever charging to 100% or going below 14%. I felt it was rather successful. There were also lots of hills involved for more than half of the trip and serious rain for over an hour.
Very true. That is good time, considering stopping for charging and hills/rain. Guess it is all a mindset that I would need to get used too. Really appreciate your report. That is the scariest thing when you are used to gas cars and going on trips is the charging and planning it takes when you are used to a gas vehicle. This would be my first EV.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,950
Boise, ID
I never realized the range would be cut back that drastically when driving what I consider normal for the way I drive and use my BMW.
The number on the display is called "rated" miles. It's not really an estimate of your real driving miles. That is according to an efficiency constant from the EPA testing, and the way that's done is kind of like your nearsighted granny drives. So you can kind of match that if you're doing like 60-65 mph and no heat or A/C. You can certainly go faster than that and drive however you normally want to, but then that wind resistance is a big deal, so then don't expect your real distance to match 1:1 with the numbers on the display.
Guess it is all a mindset that I would need to get used too. Really appreciate your report. That is the scariest thing when you are used to gas cars and going on trips is the charging and planning it takes when you are used to a gas vehicle. This would be my first EV.
There certainly is some mindset change. People tend to think it takes planning, but not really much. The Supercharger locations are already built into the Navigation, so you don't have to go look them up or find them. And if you want to just let it figure the whole thing, you can just put in Dallas to Chicago, and it will figure out all of it, with each stop, and the charging time at each one, etc. etc. It's pretty simple. I don't always let it go full auto like that, because I sometimes don't like if it's trying to charge too long at one Supercharger to skip over the next one. So frequently, I'll just show the Superchargers on the map, pick one that's about the right distance ahead that I want, and then navigate to that one.

And yes, that is a different kind of mindset and expectation. With a gas car, you can just grit your teeth and drive for as many hours non-stop as possible until the fuel gauge is low, and then fill up as fast as possible and then do 5 or 6 more hours straight. That kind of thing isn't really possible with electric cars, but that's also kind of an uncomfortable travel method for a lot of people. (I heard a wife griping at her husband's masochistic travel routine like that and welcoming the idea of more breaks.) So if you can go into it expecting to plug in and walk away and go get a coffee or snack every few hours, or take actual meal breaks for maybe a half hour instead of the drive-thru and eat on the road, then it's fairly normal and doesn't feel like you're waiting much.
 

NOLA21SGuy

Member
Jan 25, 2021
211
553
New Orleans, Louisiana
The number on the display is called "rated" miles. It's not really an estimate of your real driving miles. That is according to an efficiency constant from the EPA testing, and the way that's done is kind of like your nearsighted granny drives. So you can kind of match that if you're doing like 60-65 mph and no heat or A/C. You can certainly go faster than that and drive however you normally want to, but then that wind resistance is a big deal, so then don't expect your real distance to match 1:1 with the numbers on the display.

There certainly is some mindset change. People tend to think it takes planning, but not really much. The Supercharger locations are already built into the Navigation, so you don't have to go look them up or find them. And if you want to just let it figure the whole thing, you can just put in Dallas to Chicago, and it will figure out all of it, with each stop, and the charging time at each one, etc. etc. It's pretty simple. I don't always let it go full auto like that, because I sometimes don't like if it's trying to charge too long at one Supercharger to skip over the next one. So frequently, I'll just show the Superchargers on the map, pick one that's about the right distance ahead that I want, and then navigate to that one.

And yes, that is a different kind of mindset and expectation. With a gas car, you can just grit your teeth and drive for as many hours non-stop as possible until the fuel gauge is low, and then fill up as fast as possible and then do 5 or 6 more hours straight. That kind of thing isn't really possible with electric cars, but that's also kind of an uncomfortable travel method for a lot of people. (I heard a wife griping at her husband's masochistic travel routine like that and welcoming the idea of more breaks.) So if you can go into it expecting to plug in and walk away and go get a coffee or snack every few hours, or take actual meal breaks for maybe a half hour instead of the drive-thru and eat on the road, then it's fairly normal and doesn't feel like you're waiting much.
To be fair, I originally intended to attempt to range the drive. My travel day started at 4 AM, and I got to the new car at 10 AM. I had to take a car service to the airport in a city I am not familiar with, a plane from there to Nashville, an uber from the airport to Tesla, and then drive 550 miles. By the time I was at the first supercharger stop, I was ready to get home.

The drive was extremely comfortable. I used Abetterrouteplanner.com to compare what the car suggested to different charge percent scenarios, and the car's suggestion was best. I didn't actually charge up to a specific % on the first stop. I just set the car to 90% so it would go for a while and I went inside a restaurant to eat a quick bite. I left whenever I was done, which happened to be 20% more charge than I needed to get to my next stop, but also gave me 30%+ cushion. The extra range allowed me to drive however I wanted for that stretch. The next stop was more normal, set it to 90% which was requested by the car and ABRP, then go fiddle around for 30 minutes. Overall, there was nothing to dislike.

To your point though DBV1, my truck had the huge tank and could go 650 miles before needing a refill. I made it all the way from Byrdstown, TN on the Kentucky/Tennessee border to my house in New Orleans last year without stopping. I certainly understand the mindset, but the shift isn't as drastic as you would suspect. It's nice to get there fast, but it is also nice to have a relaxing drive. It takes very little work to travel that distance in the Tesla.

Beyond that, the car is just fun. I floored it in insane mode yesterday and my wife and kids couldn't stop laughing. I did the same with 2 friends in the car and one of them remarked, "OH... so it's a roller coaster. Got it. Feels exactly the same as the launch at the beginning of Rock-N-Roller coaster".

Anyway, 10/10, would buy again.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,950
Boise, ID
I didn't actually charge up to a specific % on the first stop. I just set the car to 90% so it would go for a while and I went inside a restaurant to eat a quick bite. I left whenever I was done, which happened to be 20% more charge than I needed to get to my next stop, but also gave me 30%+ cushion.
Yes!! Dude, you are figuring out all the pro-tip stuff on your own. When I'm leaving home for any kind of Supercharger trip, I always just peg that slider all the way up at the top and leave it there while traveling. That would be a waste to have the car stop charging and sit there while you're still eating. Don't try to set that limiter at any of your stops. Just stay until your arrival % on your nav for the next stop shows a comfortable margin.

And that's the other helpful thing is you can alternate long/short/long/short sometimes with your Supercharger stops. As you noticed, take your meal break, the car fills up extra. A couple hours later, it can be a quick 15 minute type of thing because you still have some leftover. And then maybe the one after that, it will be low again, but time for eating.
 

outdoors

Always roaming
Supporting Member
Aug 10, 2014
1,681
2,878
in the moment
Anyone have any comparisons of the refresh Model S real world range versus the previous Raven model S range? Does the new refresh heat pump show off in cold climes? Is the 20 mile or so 'buffer' still there when the percentage reaches 0? I'm hoping some sandbagging went on when it comes to the refresh range...


FWIW:

Great place to test is Fargo to Dickinson ND. Nice mostly flat until end 340 mile stretch of chargers where you can average 85 with consistent speeds(never stuck behind things) and wide openness mostly legal over the stretch including drive up to charger. Most people have respect for the left lane here.

I saw little improvement from a 100D to a Raven for energy consumption. Very interested to see some TeslFi stats on the refreshed S for similar types of driving.
 

Ormond

Active Member
Jul 10, 2016
1,065
1,584
Central Florida
To be fair, I originally intended to attempt to range the drive. My travel day started at 4 AM, and I got to the new car at 10 AM. I had to take a car service to the airport in a city I am not familiar with, a plane from there to Nashville, an uber from the airport to Tesla, and then drive 550 miles. By the time I was at the first supercharger stop, I was ready to get home.

The drive was extremely comfortable. I used Abetterrouteplanner.com to compare what the car suggested to different charge percent scenarios, and the car's suggestion was best. I didn't actually charge up to a specific % on the first stop. I just set the car to 90% so it would go for a while and I went inside a restaurant to eat a quick bite. I left whenever I was done, which happened to be 20% more charge than I needed to get to my next stop, but also gave me 30%+ cushion. The extra range allowed me to drive however I wanted for that stretch. The next stop was more normal, set it to 90% which was requested by the car and ABRP, then go fiddle around for 30 minutes. Overall, there was nothing to dislike.

To your point though DBV1, my truck had the huge tank and could go 650 miles before needing a refill. I made it all the way from Byrdstown, TN on the Kentucky/Tennessee border to my house in New Orleans last year without stopping. I certainly understand the mindset, but the shift isn't as drastic as you would suspect. It's nice to get there fast, but it is also nice to have a relaxing drive. It takes very little work to travel that distance in the Tesla.

Beyond that, the car is just fun. I floored it in insane mode yesterday and my wife and kids couldn't stop laughing. I did the same with 2 friends in the car and one of them remarked, "OH... so it's a roller coaster. Got it. Feels exactly the same as the launch at the beginning of Rock-N-Roller coaster".

Anyway, 10/10, would buy again.
Very helpful information, I’ve been driving ICE for the last couple years. It’s great to have a refresher. Thank you for sharing with us! Best of luck with you new Model S!
 
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David_Cary

Active Member
Dec 17, 2012
1,239
779
Cary, NC
Always remember, those 21 inch rims are hurting efficiency. Stick to the basic rims and closer to 68 mph with a/c running is about rated (at least in my car).
If speeds were moderated a bit and 19 inch rims, it could have been one stop. Also, this maiden trip was hurt by starting at 87% and tires that were not broken in yet.
One stop after 4.5 hours (say at 72 mph) for a meal would be considered pretty normal driving pattern for many people.
 

txgreen

New Member
Jul 20, 2021
4
3
texas
Really looking forward to somebody confirming LR 19" range and charging speed. Just ordered 3rd MS (red again!). I am hoping this will cut our trip to Santa Fe down to 12 hours. Currently in our 85D the journey is 50 miles longer than direct and requires 4 superchargers which means we add an overnight stop. A 12 hour trip would enable weekend trips.
I am hoping that the LR will charge from 160 to 380 miles in less than 45 mins on a V1 charger. I hope someone can confirm "soon", before October if the monkey is to be trusted.
 

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