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Refreshed 2021+ Model X and Model X Plaid waiting room

Although tempted, I won't buy a first model year car, let alone a first model year electric car, let alone a first model year electric car from a startup company...
So.... What do you consider this refresh? It's essentially a first model year under the covers for all purposes.
 
  • Funny
Reactions: ironwill96 and Stro
I’m in Bucks County. I’ll be using Jace with Focus Creative Company in Ballmawr. He’s got some really great work and quotes about the same as our NJ friend. I’m getting something a bit extra so my quote would be off. Tell him Steph with the model x that’s taking forever to arrive sent you. He’ll laugh.

Focus Creative Company
Thank you, my Bucks County brethren. I’ll check this guy as well. Maybe he will offer a group rate for Elon’s victims.
 
  • Love
Reactions: tintedrosie
a major issue i have with the Rivian is lack of heat pump. How do you build an EV adventure vehicle without a heatpump

How did Tesla survive the first decade? What's the ongoing issue with the heat pump from the Model Y? Capacitive has worked fine for the Model S for years now. Not perfect, but it works - and it's way quieter. At least Rivian offers a larger pack to accommodate.
 

Hephaestus

Order: 2/6/21 DC: Kennesaw, Ga Blue, LR, 5 seat
Sep 29, 2021
101
560
Marietta, GA
All right, been doing some research. The pandemic, terrible weather from nonexistent climate change and half bright business leader types are the culprits.

1) Texas factories that make foam for a variety of products from furniture to auto seats to child carseats were damaged by last winter's storm. Many were knocked off line causing a backup. There is also a shortage of the chemicals used to make foam. This has delayed many products. (I've personally be waiting for a new c-pap machine to replace the one that broke last summer since early November. If you go on line to try and purchase a C-pap, they're not to be had anywhere -- C-pap machines use a lot of foam). Obviously, Tesla is affected.

2) The microchip shortage is now said to probably last throughout this year. COVID protocols that caused people to work from home along with an explosion in demand for consumer products, and yes onboard computer/processors for autos (notably self-driving tech) are way behind demand.

3) The microchip market is expected to double from the current $500 billion to $1 trillion over the next 2-3 years. COVID shut down several chip manufacturers in Asia for several months. It also didn't help that the Chinese SHUT DOWN industrial production for hundreds of miles around Beijing to ensure there would be blue skies for the (*&^&^&* Olympics, compounding the problems.

4) There is even a shortage of chips that are used in machines that build the machines to make microchips.

5) Intel has announced it is investing $20 billion to make a new microchip factory in Ohio; it will take 2-3 years to complete. Other Asian microchip manufacturers, such as Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSMC) and Samsung are DEMANDING ridiculous tax breaks before they will commit to building the new plants they've announced.

"The supply chain bottlenecks of the past two years are part of the reason there’s such urgency to create more chip manufacturing capability in the U.S. Unable to get the chips used in manufacturing cars, U.S. automakers such as General Motors idled some North American plants last year and resorted to manufacturing some cars without features that require chips. That’s made it more difficult for U.S. consumers to buy cars, driving the price of used cars up 24% over the course of a year, and slowing national economic growth.

Supply chain bottlenecks have motivated big companies to start increasing capacity in the U.S.; Intel itself said last year it would spend $20 billion to build two major factories in Arizona, and in 2020, the global leader in chip manufacturing Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), said it would spend $12 billion to build a semiconductor factory, also in Arizona. Samsung is investing $17 billion in a chip plant in Texas."
- Time Magazine

6) I've posted something similar before, but to keep it in front of us: In the 1990s, U.S. companies decided to outsource a large % of our manufacturing capacity to China to take advantage of "cheap" labor. Our brilliant CEOs ignored that China is an authoritarian state. They were so eager to gain access to Chinese markets they signed prohibitive deals that forced them to partner with Chinese companies; even worse, the Chinese partners all had majority control. The Chinese used to partnerships to learn their "partners'" tech secrets, stole them, and built their own companies to compete with their American, French, British, what have you partners. Now add in the "brilliant" concept of just in time manufacturing. The idea is a part or even a whole product is not made until an order exists with consumers waiting at the other end. The factory, like FoxCon, makes the stuff and it's immediately loaded onto a ship, sent to LA or elsewhere, where it is promptly unloaded, put on rail cars or in trucks and is in the store or Amazon's warehouses in days. The concept is to avoid having a lot of capital sitting around in warehouses. Well, COVID caused the supply chain to break down. Delay after delay piled up even as demand exploded outside China. Oh, now add in that transport companies screw over truck drivers with low wages. It's a lonely, demanding job and there aren't enough truck drivers to move all the freight necessary. It's now estimated that the U.S. will have a shortage of 180k truck drivers by 2030.

7) As some may have noticed, the Chinese economy is in a tailspin. The Central Committee in its wisdom doesn't allow ordinary citizens to invest in the kinds of things we do (i.e. stocks & bonds). The only investment, in reality, they're allowed to make is to invest in real estate. Even there, it's only a lifetime investment. If you own a 2nd or 3rd house or whatever, when you die ownership reverts back to the state. Having nowhere else to turn to save for retirement, the Chinese people invested in real estate, much of it in ghost cities where no one actually lives. This created a real estate bubble that makes the one we had in 2007 look paltry in comparison. To cash in, Chinese developers went deeper and deeper into debt to build new housing to sell that no one wants to live in. That bubble has burst. Several of China's biggest development companies have defaulted on bonds they sold to finance further unneeded housing construction.

8) The Chinese economy is in the tank. China's all wise Central Committee has basically allowed the real estate bubble to burst. More companies are defaulting on interest payments on bond type investments they sold. This is tanking the entire economy with consumer demand imploding. The suddenly fearful and broke Chinese people have stopped buying stuff. Once busy malls are ghost towns. On top of this, the CentCom has decided to bring the hammer down on many business sectors spinning the into financial crisis. (Pssst, American CEOs, authoritarian regimes tend to do stuff like this). Meanwhile, with demand falling, many companies from outside China have closed their factories and are taking them home or are relocating to other cheap labor markets like Vietnam. Wal Mart, for example, has been closing stores all over China. European hypermarkets are doing the same. We're not talking a few hundred or thousand store and factory shutdowns, it's thousands upon thousands.

9) Bringing it around to Tesla, that means it's a struggle to get everything from foam for car seats to chips to put in the car's onboard computer. It's a freaking mess. Is Elon partly to blame for being overly optimistic? Yeah. But the bulk of the blame lies with this "chase the cheap labor to China" and "just in time" crowd. They're the ones who supply many of the parts to make a Tesla and I hold them primarily responsible.

10) The China solution DID NOT WORK. Until our genius CEOs stop treating the rest of us like chattel to be discarded at every opportunity, this kind of stuff will continue. A CEO can put together the most brilliant PowerPoint position ever seen -- but if there's no one around to make the stuff, transport it and get it on the shelves -- how valuable is that slideshow? It ain't worth spit. Plus, according to the business press, they're busy right now giving themselves 20%+ raises and profits are way up as well. IOW, they're taking advantage to raise prices exorbitantly on us and are bragging about it to their shareholders. Ain't that cute?

I haven't had a decent night's sleep since last July. My MX now looks like it won't be here until then earliest. I'm mad as a hornet.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
2.5 weeks and 1000 miles in still loving the Porsche Taycan Turbo S. A few times CarPlay hasn’t connected but besides that been great. Car so far seems rock solid. Decent tech, comfortable, and great to drive. I was worried not going Tesla for our 2nd EV but feeling more comfortable with each day.

Had a few issues with the electrify America chargers, but nothing major.

Biggest issue I have is it’s stupid to call an EV a Turbo and regardless what their marketting guys say it’s dumb.
My firs computer was an 386, and it had a turbo buton.
 

ShadX

MXP Black/White FSD 22”
Jan 31, 2022
146
365
Paramus
Still no change yet
 

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Well...August. Just f'n wonderful. Anyone who wants to defend Tesla through this - please don't. This situation cannot be solely due to: parts backlog, "production is hard" - it's a FUBAR situation and I absolutely believe that either they've absolutely screwed this refresh up in engineering (by my recollection the refresh ramp-up is actually slower than the initial production back in 2015/6) or they're looking at changing things to include something that isn't expected 🤣 - yeah, not happening. I suspect that this may have something to do with the heat pump/octovalve manifold issues as well.

Things I'm grateful for: 1) I still have a car (maybe - if Tesla responds to me back about the buyout), 2) that I'm still in line 😂, 3) that at the rate Tesla is going, Model X deliveries will happen about the same time I expect the Rivian, so perhaps there will be a conscious decision to be made.

Also to note - adaptive headlights have been approved by the feds!
Agree on all points, including Rivian. I may be facing a similar decision.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MusingLee and Stro
All right, been doing some research. The pandemic, terrible weather from nonexistent climate change and half bright business leader types are the culprits.

1) Texas factories that make foam for a variety of products from furniture to auto seats to child carseats were damaged by last winter's storm. Many were knocked off line causing a backup. There is also a shortage of the chemicals used to make foam. This has delayed many products. (I've personally be waiting for a new c-pap machine to replace the one that broke last summer since early November. If you go on line to try and purchase a C-pap, they're not to be had anywhere -- C-pap machines use a lot of foam). Obviously, Tesla is affected.

2) The microchip shortage is now said to probably last throughout this year. COVID protocols that caused people to work from home along with an explosion in demand for consumer products, and yes onboard computer/processors for autos (notably self-driving tech) are way behind demand.

3) The microchip market is expected to double from the current $500 billion to $1 trillion over the next 2-3 years. COVID shut down several chip manufacturers in Asia for several months. It also didn't help that the Chinese SHUT DOWN industrial production for hundreds of miles around Beijing to ensure there would be blue skies for the (*&^&^&* Olympics, compounding the problems.

4) There is even a shortage of chips that are used in machines that build the machines to make microchips.

5) Intel has announced it is investing $20 billion to make a new microchip factory in Ohio; it will take 2-3 years to complete. Other Asian microchip manufacturers, such as Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSMC) and Samsung are DEMANDING ridiculous tax breaks before they will commit to building the new plants they've announced.

"The supply chain bottlenecks of the past two years are part of the reason there’s such urgency to create more chip manufacturing capability in the U.S. Unable to get the chips used in manufacturing cars, U.S. automakers such as General Motors idled some North American plants last year and resorted to manufacturing some cars without features that require chips. That’s made it more difficult for U.S. consumers to buy cars, driving the price of used cars up 24% over the course of a year, and slowing national economic growth.

Supply chain bottlenecks have motivated big companies to start increasing capacity in the U.S.; Intel itself said last year it would spend $20 billion to build two major factories in Arizona, and in 2020, the global leader in chip manufacturing Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), said it would spend $12 billion to build a semiconductor factory, also in Arizona. Samsung is investing $17 billion in a chip plant in Texas."
- Time Magazine

6) I've posted something similar before, but to keep it in front of us: In the 1990s, U.S. companies decided to outsource a large % of our manufacturing capacity to China to take advantage of "cheap" labor. Our brilliant CEOs ignored that China is an authoritarian state. They were so eager to gain access to Chinese markets they signed prohibitive deals that forced them to partner with Chinese companies; even worse, the Chinese partners all had majority control. The Chinese used to partnerships to learn their "partners'" tech secrets, stole them, and built their own companies to compete with their American, French, British, what have you partners. Now add in the "brilliant" concept of just in time manufacturing. The idea is a part or even a whole product is not made until an order exists with consumers waiting at the other end. The factory, like FoxCon, makes the stuff and it's immediately loaded onto a ship, sent to LA or elsewhere, where it is promptly unloaded, put on rail cars or in trucks and is in the store or Amazon's warehouses in days. The concept is to avoid having a lot of capital sitting around in warehouses. Well, COVID caused the supply chain to break down. Delay after delay piled up even as demand exploded outside China. Oh, now add in that transport companies screw over truck drivers with low wages. It's a lonely, demanding job and there aren't enough truck drivers to move all the freight necessary. It's now estimated that the U.S. will have a shortage of 180k truck drivers by 2030.

7) As some may have noticed, the Chinese economy is in a tailspin. The Central Committee in its wisdom doesn't allow ordinary citizens to invest in the kinds of things we do (i.e. stocks & bonds). The only investment, in reality, they're allowed to make is to invest in real estate. Even there, it's only a lifetime investment. If you own a 2nd or 3rd house or whatever, when you die ownership reverts back to the state. Having nowhere else to turn to save for retirement, the Chinese people invested in real estate, much of it in ghost cities where no one actually lives. This created a real estate bubble that makes the one we had in 2007 look paltry in comparison. To cash in, Chinese developers went deeper and deeper into debt to build new housing to sell that no one wants to live in. That bubble has burst. Several of China's biggest development companies have defaulted on bonds they sold to finance further unneeded housing construction.

8) The Chinese economy is in the tank. China's all wise Central Committee has basically allowed the real estate bubble to burst. More companies are defaulting on interest payments on bond type investments they sold. This is tanking the entire economy with consumer demand imploding. The suddenly fearful and broke Chinese people have stopped buying stuff. Once busy malls are ghost towns. On top of this, the CentCom has decided to bring the hammer down on many business sectors spinning the into financial crisis. (Pssst, American CEOs, authoritarian regimes tend to do stuff like this). Meanwhile, with demand falling, many companies from outside China have closed their factories and are taking them home or are relocating to other cheap labor markets like Vietnam. Wal Mart, for example, has been closing stores all over China. European hypermarkets are doing the same. We're not talking a few hundred or thousand store and factory shutdowns, it's thousands upon thousands.

9) Bringing it around to Tesla, that means it's a struggle to get everything from foam for car seats to chips to put in the car's onboard computer. It's a freaking mess. Is Elon partly to blame for being overly optimistic? Yeah. But the bulk of the blame lies with this "chase the cheap labor to China" and "just in time" crowd. They're the ones who supply many of the parts to make a Tesla and I hold them primarily responsible.

10) The China solution DID NOT WORK. Until our genius CEOs stop treating the rest of us like chattel to be discarded at every opportunity, this kind of stuff will continue. A CEO can put together the most brilliant PowerPoint position ever seen -- but if there's no one around to make the stuff, transport it and get it on the shelves -- how valuable is that slideshow? It ain't worth spit. Plus, according to the business press, they're busy right now giving themselves 20%+ raises and profits are way up as well. IOW, they're taking advantage to raise prices exorbitantly on us and are bragging about it to their shareholders. Ain't that cute?

I haven't had a decent night's sleep since last July. My MX now looks like it won't be here until then earliest. I'm mad as a hornet and want to string up a few CEOs and business gurus for therapy, but there's probably a rope shortage too.
Fantastic write up 👍🏼
 

Empty tank

MXLR/BLK/Cream/20"/FSD Delivered 6/15/22 Flawless
Sep 6, 2021
663
1,327
Memphis
More of the same!!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Elixir
Well I Hope everyone is enjoying their Mid February EDD adjustment....I'd rather have a colonoscopy
Oddly i’m getting one on the 25th then picking up plaid X the very next day. was this your doing? 🤔

i think that’s the trick. scheduled colonoscopy = VIN. it’s worth a try.
 
I will be honest, the front end has grown on me. But I’m so pissed off about the treatment from Tesla that I’ll learn to like the Rivian R1S if they actually deliver the damn thing. They have had delays, but they communicate with the order holders. Theor order holders are not sitting in the dark wondering when and if they’ll ever get a car. Currently the plan is to see which one gets delivered first, I still will take delivery of the model X. The question will be, will it be first or second to be delivered. If it’s second and I like the Rivian I’ll probably sell off the model X and be done with Tesla. As a customer I’m going to evaluate the product, the customer experience, and my overall satisfaction with the process and my purchase.
I feel the same though I am waiting for R1S ix50 and MXLR, which was ordered early 1/21…. The others much later as backups
 
Range is also elevation changes, which can be worse than weather. Or both. I still don't understand why he hasn't tested the Model S or the Model X with their strong EPA numbers. It makes it seem as if he's paid to do the cars he does. From there comes the bias.
Yes I do agree with you that driving habits, elevation, winds, luggage, towing etc, all do play their part in determining range but there's only a certain number of variables that can be 'checked off' during these range tests. Tom always says that he mostly does his range tests driving along the NJ turnpike at 'slightly less than ideal conditions'. He also doesn't do for instance a 80mph test (which to me is actually highway speeds) because he wants to basically set it on autopilot and cruise away without the slightest disturbances. The Lucid he tested was along the 303 loop which we all know is a fairly uncrowded highway, just a few lane changes here and there. In fact he too had about 600ft elevations all during the trip, so meaning he isn't testing one vehicle with favorable conditions and another in a different way. He gets that question on his YouTube podcast ALL THE TIME. He also doesn't get days upon days access to every vehicle he keeps to conduct the range & charging tests all at once (look at Lucid for example). He's done a charging test on a Model S (LR or Plaid) for sure. Anywho, I'm inherently a skeptical guy myself too but he's not ingenuine for sure! Now one thing I do certainly want to know, although it still wouldn't not sway me away from a Lucid, is how the heck does this car do in super cold conditions. We just may not know that answer for a bit since their deliveries just began in November or so from here in AZ
 

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