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"Refreshed" Model S model VIBRATION tracking and information thread!!!

What version of "Refreshed" Model S do you drive?


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At this point, who knows if Tesla got a bad batch of shafts that were manufactured inconsistently, same with the universal joint of the shafts. The initiators of a resultant vibration issue in shaft style of power transmission systems are over angling of the joint, concentricity of the shaft assembly outside of specifications in static and or dynamic.
The output of the final drive and motor could, if not retained by a solid mounting that arrests kinetic loads and NVH, initiate the vibration. Same with the driven hub in all aspects. Amazing test of engineering for what is usually taken for granted when using the power of these cars. Whish I could get ahold of a schematic of the power train or hands on while on a lift!

To all that unfortunately have to have this shaft replacement done in the future, please try to get a picture of the shafts and post for future reference!!

Some mechanics just replace parts, some do that and wonder why...🤔 Which one do you want to talk to?
 
The output of the final drive and motor could, if not retained by a solid mounting that arrests kinetic loads and NVH, initiate the vibration.
And part of it is going to be because the steering rack is now hard mounted to the sub-frame where that has never been the case in the past. (Something Munro commented on.) So whatever NVH that exists is going to be amplified into the cabin compared to how things were on the old Model S. So it very well could be a characteristic of the refresh Model S.
 
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And part of it is going to be because the steering rack is now hard mounted to the sub-frame where that has never been the case in the past. (Something Munro commented on.) So whatever NVH that exists is going to be amplified into the cabin compared to how things were on the old Model S. So it very well could be a characteristic of the refresh Model S.
That is why I assumed (dumb'me, dumy), that Tesla would be using steer by wire, especially to have variable ratio dynamic yoke steering.o_O
I did see a clevis style motor mount above the centerline of final drive output in the Munro video. To me, I would want a diagonal link mounted in opposition, 12 o'clock - 6 o'clock, both mounts equally distant to the centerline of output / inner drive shaft coupling.
 
66FD4B8C-65AA-431B-8AED-54C9BFAED217.gif

Good news! DriveTesla is giving our comcern the light of day! Be sure to reply via the “tips” link at the end of the article. I suspect they will publish another after they get flooded with tips!


@driveteslaca
 
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This is a 100% suspension geometry issue, and until that changes it will continue to be a problem. The angle of the axels is asymmetrical at all drive heights and has a maximum operating angle that never exceeds 54 degrees on outboard joints, usually 47 to 54 is what is put in most cars on the outboard joints and 22-31 degrees on inboard joints. The higher the degree range of operating angle the more cyclic vibration. This is why in low suspension setting the vibration can be eliminated. I am going to assume the problem is entirely the inboard joints that are being pushed beyond 31 degrees of movement and are prematurely failing. The fix to replace a clevis mount that allows sideways movement isn't the right answer, the axel has to be able to extend and compress or it will wear out even faster. If I was to bet what is causing the problem, it is the motor itself moving and putting stress on the right inner joint, until you solve for that, I don't see a resolution.
 
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This is a 100% suspension geometry issue, and until that changes it will continue to be a problem. The angle of the axels is asymmetrical at all drive heights and has a maximum operating angle that never exceeds 54 degrees on outboard joints, usually 47 to 54 is what is put in most cars on the outboard joints and 22-31 degrees on inboard joints. The higher the degree range of operating angle the more cyclic vibration. This is why in low suspension setting the vibration can be eliminated. I am going to assume the problem is entirely the inboard joints that are being pushed beyond 31 degrees of movement and are prematurely failing. The fix to replace a clevis mount that allows sideways movement isn't the right answer, the axel has to be able to extend and compress or it will wear out even faster. If I was to bet what is causing the problem, it is the motor itself moving and putting stress on the right inner joint, until you solve for that, I don't see a resolution.

Sounds like that solution would be cost prohibitive for Telsa. Simply put, they would have to find a way to mount the front DU lower. Not happening any time this decade.

@WilliamG
 
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View attachment 768324

Good news! DriveTesla is giving our comcern the light of day! Be sure to reply via the “tips” link at the end of the article. I suspect they will publish another after they get flooded with tips!


@driveteslaca
email sent
 
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Yeah, it’s starting to wear me down a bit. Constant vibration. I was at the SC getting my repeater replaced (tesla broke 2 repeaters trying to replace my original). I asked the manager about the vibration issue, he had no idea what i was talking about, even though i had a service visit mentioning that problem along with the airbag replacement one.

he didn’t have time to drive with me to experience it himself.
 
Yeah, it’s starting to wear me down a bit. Constant vibration. I was at the SC getting my repeater replaced (tesla broke 2 repeaters trying to replace my original). I asked the manager about the vibration issue, he had no idea what i was talking about, even though i had a service visit mentioning that problem along with the airbag replacement one.

he didn’t have time to drive with me to experience it himself.

@yerEVan Did you report your vibration via the link in the article? [email protected]
 
This is a 100% suspension geometry issue, and until that changes it will continue to be a problem. The angle of the axels is asymmetrical at all drive heights and has a maximum operating angle that never exceeds 54 degrees on outboard joints, usually 47 to 54 is what is put in most cars on the outboard joints and 22-31 degrees on inboard joints. The higher the degree range of operating angle the more cyclic vibration. This is why in low suspension setting the vibration can be eliminated. I am going to assume the problem is entirely the inboard joints that are being pushed beyond 31 degrees of movement and are prematurely failing. The fix to replace a clevis mount that allows sideways movement isn't the right answer, the axel has to be able to extend and compress or it will wear out even faster. If I was to bet what is causing the problem, it is the motor itself moving and putting stress on the right inner joint, until you solve for that, I don't see a resolution.
Very interesting! Did you actually measure these angles on your car?
 
sure. i’ll post it. what article? sorry i missed that.
@yerEVan

Also, see post 227

And, the article even points, via link, to this TMC thread! Get the word out!
 
Very interesting! Did you actually measure these angles on your car?
No need to measure, this is what CV joints operate at. I am not sure why, but the axels on the cars are asymmetrical in length (a guess I would say its how the motor is positioned and the differential it uses being on the left side) also, there is some type of bracket on the right side of the axel (to me its an actual clevis mount) but not what Tesla refers to as a clevis mount, I can see how this could be a problem. My 2 cents but until this whole setup is re-engineered it will be a problem. I vote for symmetry of axels and freedom to move in and out and I see great results coming from that, if I had to place my bet, I would say the right side is always the problem, its just a poor design from what I see.