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Regenerative braking on icy roads

I am concerned about the fact that the strength of regenerative braking cannot be adjusted, since Tesla remove the option to turn regen off. I wonder what experiences people have had with the Tesla on snow and icy roads when slowing down and braking. When regenerative braking kicks in is it more likely to skid than an ICE car would? I am used to taking the foot off the accelerator to slow down gradually in such conditions. Does Tesla automatically reduce the strength of regenerative braking when the tires slip?Are there any tips for driving on show and ice?
 
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Zoomit

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Sep 1, 2015
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The friction brakes are controlled by the brake pedal. But if applying the brake pedal shuts down the regen of releasing the accelerator, then a light touch of the brake might disable the regen without actually touching the discs.
Regen and friction beakes are independent. The power meter line above the speedometer indicates the regen power when the line is green. It’s a nonlinear indicator—light regen is shown as a relatively long line. Using this, it’s easy to tell that a light touch of the brake pedal does not affect regen. This is easiest to see when going downhill.
 

jcanoe

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Oct 2, 2020
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In some vehicles, i.e. the Chevy Volt and Chevy Bolt, whenever the ABS is activated as can happen when braking on ice all regenerative braking is immediately disabled. When this happens, a brief second, it feels as if you have lost all braking until the ABS starts to slow the vehicle.
 
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I am concerned about the fact that the strength of regenerative braking cannot be adjusted, since Tesla remove the option to turn regen off. I wonder what experiences people have had with the Tesla on snow and icy roads when slowing down and braking. When regenerative braking kicks in is it more likely to skid than an ICE car would? I am used to taking the foot off the accelerator to slow down gradually in such conditions. Does Tesla automatically reduce the strength of regenerative braking when the tires slip?Are there any tips for driving on show and ice?
The car dynamically adjusts regen if senses that a wheel is about to lock up (much like ABS). You can see that on an icy road the green bar is all over the place if you suddenly take your foot off the accelerator.
Obviously there is no substitute for safe driving, especially in the winter, but the regen is not something to be concerned about. I always have my regen set to full and never had any issues so far. And I live in Ontario where winters can be pretty harsh.
 
The next generation of EV drivers won’t be asking this question. Because they unlike us will have never driven a vehicle without regen. To them feathering the braking with the accelerator pedal will be a natural instinct.

Frankly if there’s ice it’s also likely cold also??? Regen is going to be reduced anyway….. My wife and I have never used the reduced regen option. I guess we never seen any reason why we would want to. But we’ll admit that yes we do have extensive winter driving experience.
 

MY-Y

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Mar 4, 2020
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Letting off the gas pedal enables full power regen. For my MY, this is ~82 kW of power in reverse at highway speeds with a warm battery. Hitting the brake pedal doesn't change this at all. Unfortunately for snow driving, this is 100% rear wheel braking. It didn't cause me any issues last winter though. ABS still keeps things under control.
Screenshot_20210907-112424.jpg
 

Darmie

Super Member
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Jan 13, 2016
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Clear Lake TX.
The car dynamically adjusts regen if senses that a wheel is about to lock up (much like ABS). You can see that on an icy road the green bar is all over the place if you suddenly take your foot off the accelerator.
Obviously there is no substitute for safe driving, especially in the winter, but the regen is not something to be concerned about. I always have my regen set to full and never had any issues so far. And I live in Ontario where winters can be pretty harsh.
That's good to know. That will save us from watching an hour of Bjorn testing this out. I think he missed his calling on testing this. He's always driving in the snow.
 
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If you press the brake while still depressing the accelerator pedal, I think regen is disabled (as is acceleration) and only the friction brakes are applied. Not with my MY now if anyone else wants to test. I could be mistaken...did some testing a few weeks back but I can't quite remember.

EDIT not suggesting that this would be a reasonable thing to do...probably quite dangerous and hard to manage the pedals properly with both feet. Just interesting.
 
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Fourdoor

Active Member
May 31, 2016
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United States
Letting off the gas pedal enables full power regen. For my MY, this is ~82 kW of power in reverse at highway speeds with a warm battery. Hitting the brake pedal doesn't change this at all. Unfortunately for snow driving, this is 100% rear wheel braking. It didn't cause me any issues last winter though. ABS still keeps things under control.

Really good info here. I am very surprised that Tesla's don't take advantage of the front motor for regenerative braking. If I had to guess, I would say they did this to simplify things, they have the same amount of regen on RWD cars as they do on AWD cars this way.

Keith

PS: Also surprised about the lower regen in winter. A Chevy Bolt with a 60 kWh battery has full 70 KW regen unless the battery pack is damn near frozen solid.
 

Zoomit

Active Member
Sep 1, 2015
2,266
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SoCal
PS: Also surprised about the lower regen in winter. A Chevy Bolt with a 60 kWh battery has full 70 KW regen unless the battery pack is damn near frozen solid.
I had the same impression coming from the Bolt and Spark EVs as well. The Tesla battery management is MUCH more temperature sensitive than the GM BMS. I suspect, but have been unable to verify, that this is due to the relatively low Cobalt chemistry that Tesla uses (NCA vs NMC622).
 

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