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Regenerative breaking. Model y vs. Model x

I love the "firm" regen of the Model Y. I had occasion to use a Model S/75 for a week or so recently and, although regen was set to normal, I found the braking effect to be much less than that of the Model Y - and I really missed the Model Y behavior. Happy to have the Model Y back. I don't have experience with the X but wonder if it and the S are more alike in this regard.
 
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Since the pressure on the accelerator determines how much regen it applies it follows that different cars, not different models, may need more or less feathering to regen. Another matter if you talking about taking your foot completely off the pedal and how much regen you get then.
 

pt19713

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Feb 5, 2020
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Since the pressure on the accelerator determines how much regen it applies it follows that different cars, not different models, may need more or less feathering to regen. Another matter if you talking about taking your foot completely off the pedal and how much regen you get then.
Not true. The regen on the S is much weaker than the Y. It's not environment dependent. Anyone that has owned or driven various Teslas can easily notice the difference immediately.

There's a reason why you'll see brake dust on the front wheels of S and X, and not see it on the 3 and Y.
 
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Not true. The regen on the S is much weaker than the Y. It's not environment dependent. Anyone that has owned or driven various Teslas can easily notice the difference immediately.

There's a reason why you'll see brake dust on the front wheels of S and X, and not see it on the 3 and Y.
Yes, I too enjoy the stronger regen on the Y versus my previous S. I really like the Hold setting so that I rarely have to use the brakes at all!
 
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spokey

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Aug 8, 2020
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In another thread someone was talking about using chill and the low regen for winter/snow/ice driving (in fact I found that in the manual as well). I thought I'd practice that during the rain yesterday. The chill was OK but it bothered me to have to use the brake in the low regen setting. Hopefully I'll get used to it in the winter and allow more room to stop without using the brake on the low setting.

But I do wonder if I'll have a phobic aversion to the brake pedal after a couple year.
 

Snow Drift

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In another thread someone was talking about using chill and the low regen for winter/snow/ice driving (in fact I found that in the manual as well). I thought I'd practice that during the rain yesterday. The chill was OK but it bothered me to have to use the brake in the low regen setting. Hopefully I'll get used to it in the winter and allow more room to stop without using the brake on the low setting.

But I do wonder if I'll have a phobic aversion to the brake pedal after a couple year.
After 2 years with Tesla, I hate touching the brake pedal in an ICE. My Subaru PHEV does not have regen braking (at least not that I can feel). Tesla's standard regen is amazing and provides tons of stopping power. I didn't have any issues in winter, no need to change to low regen or chill if you know how to drive in the snow (and I see you have a Subaru, so you do!)
 

spokey

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After 2 years with Tesla, I hate touching the brake pedal in an ICE. My Subaru PHEV does not have regen braking (at least not that I can feel). Tesla's standard regen is amazing and provides tons of stopping power. I didn't have any issues in winter, no need to change to low regen or chill if you know how to drive in the snow (and I see you have a Subaru, so you do!)

My wife's camry has a gauge that shows battery usage / regen. You wouldn't know that any regen is happening when you take your foot off the accelerator. But the needles goes slightly in to the regen part of the gauge. When you start braking, it drops further until finally at moderate braking it is pegged as low as it will go.

My speculation has been that Toyota doesn't really dial up the regen until you press the brake pedal. So the moderate braking might be similar the the Tesla no foot on the accelerator. Then if you press hard the real brakes kick in which presumably happens similarly in the Tesla as well. Perhaps your Subie (I assume a Crosstek) operates similarly to the Camry.

But it also could all be part of my vivid imagination.
 

Snow Drift

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My wife's camry has a gauge that shows battery usage / regen. You wouldn't know that any regen is happening when you take your foot off the accelerator. But the needles goes slightly in to the regen part of the gauge. When you start braking, it drops further until finally at moderate braking it is pegged as low as it will go.

My speculation has been that Toyota doesn't really dial up the regen until you press the brake pedal. So the moderate braking might be similar the the Tesla no foot on the accelerator. Then if you press hard the real brakes kick in which presumably happens similarly in the Tesla as well. Perhaps your Subie (I assume a Crosstek) operates similarly to the Camry.

But it also could all be part of my vivid imagination.
Regen of the battery takes place, it's a similar system as yours: Motor 1 is from Camry Hybrid and the Battery is from the Prius Prime, but there is ZERO braking force. Come off the gas, car coasts like any AT/CVT. You only slow the car via brakes (and extremely, almost imperceptible, minimal engine braking). That's nothing like a Tesla when you come off the accelerator. A Tesla is violent if you lift.

In a Tesla, you never use the brake pedal unless it is really necessary. Just by modulating pressure on the accelerator pedal you can slow the car down at all speeds. Even to exit the highway I don't use the brakes in the M3/MY.
 

spokey

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Regen of the battery takes place, it's a similar system as yours: Motor 1 is from Camry Hybrid and the Battery is from the Prius Prime, but there is ZERO braking force. Come off the gas, car coasts like any AT/CVT. You only slow the car via brakes (and extremely, almost imperceptible, minimal engine braking). That's nothing like a Tesla when you come off the accelerator. A Tesla is violent if you lift.

In a Tesla, you never use the brake pedal unless it is really necessary. Just by modulating pressure on the accelerator pedal you can slow the car down at all speeds. Even to exit the highway I don't use the brakes in the M3/MY.
I agree with the Tesla. That's how I drive it. No brake on a typical trip when in standard regen. I was speculating that a camry (and perhaps the subaru) could make the initial brake pedal ramp up regen. That would give a driver the typical action and feel that they've been used to for their entire driving life while providing a good deal of regen. But again, speculation. I don't know how the Camry does it. All I know is that it's regen gauge (if you will) shows a lot stronger regen as soon as you press on the brake pedal.
 

Snow Drift

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I agree with the Tesla. That's how I drive it. No brake on a typical trip when in standard regen. I was speculating that a camry (and perhaps the subaru) could make the initial brake pedal ramp up regen. That would give a driver the typical action and feel that they've been used to for their entire driving life while providing a good deal of regen. But again, speculation. I don't know how the Camry does it. All I know is that it's regen gauge (if you will) shows a lot stronger regen as soon as you press on the brake pedal.
I get what you're saying, but I don't know why you would want to use the brake pedal when you reduce the time/complexity it takes to slow the car with one pedal vs two. I will say that Formula E had to develop a way to reduce regen braking when the drivers used the brake pads as it unsettled the driver/car. So, it is best to use one or the other, in aggressive situations.

I also see the Charge dial increase when on the brakes, that being said, all the energy is going into the battery...it is not providing braking torque.
 
Why? I would expect every new car model with new hardware to improve on things.

It's more the software itself. This was a big thing with Model S as well. Newer Model S vehicles didn't reach "parity" with older ones for several, several months. There's a lot of history with Tesla and the AP tech and internal changes with who was making/doing what.
 
I drove a Prius for several years before getting my first Tesla. Toyota worked hard to make regen feel like a typical ICE, with regen from the break pedal, and transitioning to the friction brakes at 8mph. This made it easy for an ICE driver to transition to the hybrid.

Tesla has taken a different approach, accelerator pedal controls the motor both in drive and regen, and the brake pedal controls the brakes just like any ICE. I think this means that braking is not a software function, so simpler to implement, and let the driver learn the difference.
 

Snow Drift

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I drove a Prius for several years before getting my first Tesla. Toyota worked hard to make regen feel like a typical ICE, with regen from the break pedal, and transitioning to the friction brakes at 8mph. This made it easy for an ICE driver to transition to the hybrid.

Tesla has taken a different approach, accelerator pedal controls the motor both in drive and regen, and the brake pedal controls the brakes just like any ICE. I think this means that braking is not a software function, so simpler to implement, and let the driver learn the difference.
Agreed. It takes about 2 minutes to adjust. First time you lift and fly through the steering wheel, you learn to ease off.

Anyone who has driven a manual will understand how to modulate the accelerator pedal.
 

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