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Replace back tires -> Never need to rotate tires?

eethan

Member
Oct 19, 2018
30
16
California
After driving 26k miles without rotating my stock MXV4 tires, my back and front tires had 1/8" and 5.5/8" tread depth remaining, respectively.

So it appears that the back tires on the M3 wear out twice as quickly as the front tires. In that case, can you simply replace the back tires (with the same model type of course)?

After replacing just the back tires, the front tires will still be at 5.5/8" depth and the back tires will be at a full 8/8" depth. Then keep driving without rotating tires. Now, both the front and rear tires should reach 2/8" around the same time. At this this point, simply replace all 4 tires.

What do you all think about this approach? (Excuse me - I'm not a mechanical engineer by training ;) )
 
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dmurphy

Woof.
Dec 7, 2018
3,411
4,618
New Jersey - Morris County
This is a sane course of action but has nothing to do with which wore out first, or RWD or dual-motor, or even because it’s a Tesla.

When replacing a pair of tires, always always always put the new pair on the rear. Always.

This is because the more-worn tires are more susceptible to hydroplaning. Hydroplaning in the front, and not the rear, will cause an understeer condition. The car will track straight ahead.
The reverse - hydroplaning in the rear and not the front - causes oversteer, and hence, a spin out is likely.
Understeer when hydroplaning is much much easier to control. Just track straight ahead and slow down. Oversteer is worlds more difficult.
 
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eethan

Member
Oct 19, 2018
30
16
California
I have a LR.

If there's no issue with doing this, then isn't this practice superior? - No need to spend time rotating tires + Seems to maximize the life of all 4 tires.
 

GtiMart

Member
Nov 13, 2019
683
560
Quebec City, Canada
In mechanical AWD systems it's important that all wheels be the same diameter otherwise you put strain on the center differential. Although you don't have that issue on an AWD EV, I believe the traction control and stability systems, and probably the ABS too, rely on measuring differences in rotation speed of the various wheels. If the diameters are too different, I would expect these systems to have a hard time doing their job.

In terms of putting the best in front vs rear, I've always heard the contrary: but the best in front so you can steer. Recently I've changed that to: put the best at the end where they use up fastest, to even out the wear :)
I wonder how much the argument still holds now that cars have stability control programs. Everyone that tried spinning out a Tesla on the snow have realized that it's virtually impossible.
 

todd2fst4u

Member
Oct 26, 2019
201
143
Menlo Park, CA
Tesla recommends installing new tires on the rear.
D1A6C540-EDBF-435E-AF10-C3362A8C59CB.png
 
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freeAgent

Member
Oct 29, 2020
118
99
SoCal
After driving 26k miles without rotating my stock MXV4 tires, my back and front tires had 1/8" and 5.5/8" tread depth remaining, respectively.

So it appears that the back tires on the M3 wear out twice as quickly as the front tires. In that case, can you simply replace the back tires (with the same model type of course)?

After replacing just the back tires, the front tires will still be at 5.5/8" depth and the back tires will be at a full 8/8" depth. Then keep driving without rotating tires. Now, both the front and rear tires should reach 2/8" around the same time. At this this point, simply replace all 4 tires.

What do you all think about this approach? (Excuse me - I'm not a mechanical engineer by training ;) )
This seems reasonable to me if the rears wear out at a rate that's a whole number multiple of the front tires (1x, 2x, 3x, etc. vs. 1.1x, 1.2x, 1.3x, etc.). Getting locked into the same brand for half of your tire purchases may not be ideal, but it's not the end of the world. I personally plan to rotate my tires according to the manual for now since I figure it's a good opportunity to check for other possible problems with the alignment/suspension, or wheels in general.
 
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eethan

Member
Oct 19, 2018
30
16
California
How much of a difference would it make if I replaced the back tires with Michelin Cross Climate or Pilot A/S 4 instead of the stock MXV4 that would remain on the front tires? (The CC is interesting because it provides snow traction)
 

eethan

Member
Oct 19, 2018
30
16
California
Thanks all for the helpful info!

I saw my neighbor changing his tire today so I asked him whether it would be fine to have a different model of All-season tires on my back tires. He thought that should be fine.

So for my LR M3, my plan is to keep the stock Michelin MXV4 tires in the front - each with 5.5/8" tread depth remaining. Then install fresh Michelin Crossclimate 2 tires in the back - which would have 8/8" tread depth. The idea is that both front and rear tires should then reach 2/8" tread depth around the same time (w/o rotating tires).

Please please LMK if I'm making a mistake.
 

Vaillant

Member
Jul 19, 2019
254
267
Sunnyvale, CA
Thanks all for the helpful info!

I saw my neighbor changing his tire today so I asked him whether it would be fine to have a different model of All-season tires on my back tires. He thought that should be fine.

So for my LR M3, my plan is to keep the stock Michelin MXV4 tires in the front - each with 5.5/8" tread depth remaining. Then install fresh Michelin Crossclimate 2 tires in the back - which would have 8/8" tread depth. The idea is that both front and rear tires should then reach 2/8" tread depth around the same time (w/o rotating tires).

Please please LMK if I'm making a mistake.
When we bought our used Model X, the fronts and backs were different brands. Now the rears are worn out, so we are changing them for another type again. I don’t see any harm in it, as long as they are the appropriate size and similar performance.
 

android04

Member
Apr 1, 2016
352
327
Crete, Nebraska
After driving 26k miles without rotating my stock MXV4 tires, my back and front tires had 1/8" and 5.5/8" tread depth remaining, respectively.

So it appears that the back tires on the M3 wear out twice as quickly as the front tires. In that case, can you simply replace the back tires (with the same model type of course)?

After replacing just the back tires, the front tires will still be at 5.5/8" depth and the back tires will be at a full 8/8" depth. Then keep driving without rotating tires. Now, both the front and rear tires should reach 2/8" around the same time. At this this point, simply replace all 4 tires.

What do you all think about this approach? (Excuse me - I'm not a mechanical engineer by training ;) )
Just wanted to add a slight correction to your tread measurements. They are in /32nds of an inch unless you are using metric. 1/32” is almost bald and less than legal tread depth and you are more likely to hydroplane. I know you are in California, so you don't deal with snow, but 5.5/32" tread depth would probably be good for one more winter season on winter tires.

As far as mixing tire brands, it should be fine as long as they are comparable types. I would not mix low rolling resistance all season tires (the Primacy MXM4) and ultra high performance all seasons (Pilot Sport A/S 3+).
 
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eethan

Member
Oct 19, 2018
30
16
California
Thanks for the advice! Couldn't find the rolling resistance spec but looks like my stock MXM4 and CrossClimate2 are both classed as "Grand touring All-season" so I figure they have similar characteristics.

Will be interesting to pair the CC2 in the back, with their snow traction, and the MXM4 in the front, with their quieter acoustic foam.
 

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