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[request] Show the date & times of the last 10 charges on the center display

rrolsbe

Member
Feb 18, 2017
245
135
Albuquerque
Most Tesla owners probably plug their cars in everyday as recommended by the manufacture and have never seen more than about 10 miles of phantom drain no matter how long the car may have been parked. Here is why. Unless things have changed, it is my understanding the charge level is topped off when the traction battery drops by around 3% or 10 miles for the 2018 LR Model 3. The car could have topped off the battery one or many times, while parked and plugged in, so the actual phantom drain would be hidden from the casual observer. If the in car displayed the date and times of the last 10 charge session, the owner would get a better understanding of the actual phantom drain or at least how many times the car topped off since the last driving session. I am hoping the new version 3 Tesla Wall Connector eventually helps owners better understand how much power is used by the plugged into vehicle. During these covid days many more Tesla cars are probably sitting in the garage plugged in for an extended periods of time.

If my logic is flawed, please feel free to enlighten me.

Regards
 

camalaio

Active Member
May 28, 2019
1,483
2,181
Vernon, BC, Canada
I think it would be hard to present that data in a way that makes the phantom drain (standby) portion obvious and in contrast with locomotive needs (which show up on the trip meters). In fact you sort of have access to this data for the last charge, but it requires looking in two different places and it's not a surprise that very few people do this.

Something I've learned working in software (and even being on this forum) is that a company like Tesla needs to serve a wide audience. What they do implement, they need to implement well. It's easier and beneficial to not implement too many things that the customer could get confused or concerned about.

Let's say they just called out an average "Average standby power (last week): 52W". Oh no. What is a watt? Is that high? Is that low? Is it bad if it goes too low? Perhaps Tesla could colour the text green or red to give a sense of how good the number is, but then they need to actually gather the data on what numbers are good, potentially even changing the number with some updates that change the fleet's standby behaviours. Suddenly this simple metric became a large burden, and maybe it's just better for their customers' and their employees' sanity to not expose this number.

Tesla could give us so much more info, but they intentionally (and I'd argue almost rightly) do not.

However I do view the standby power of these cars as ridiculous compared to the competition, and I wish there was better regulations and display around the subject. I have no suggestions for how to solve that problem at the regulatory level.
 
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Gasaraki

Active Member
Oct 21, 2019
2,085
1,447
Syracuse, NY
Most Tesla owners probably plug their cars in everyday as recommended by the manufacture and have never seen more than about 10 miles of phantom drain no matter how long the car may have been parked. Here is why. Unless things have changed, it is my understanding the charge level is topped off when the traction battery drops by around 3% or 10 miles for the 2018 LR Model 3. The car could have topped off the battery one or many times, while parked and plugged in, so the actual phantom drain would be hidden from the casual observer. If the in car displayed the date and times of the last 10 charge session, the owner would get a better understanding of the actual phantom drain or at least how many times the car topped off since the last driving session. I am hoping the new version 3 Tesla Wall Connector eventually helps owners better understand how much power is used by the plugged into vehicle. During these covid days many more Tesla cars are probably sitting in the garage plugged in for an extended periods of time.

If my logic is flawed, please feel free to enlighten me.

Regards

Doesn't really matter. It either phantomly drains from your battery while it's not plugged in or it phantomly drains directly from your wall connector cause it's charging the battery.
 
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elptxjc

Member
Dec 15, 2019
833
264
El Paso, TX
It's easy to know. Don't leave it plugged in. And check back your charge in as many days as you want :). After extensive reading, I decided to go 'halfway' between what the experts say it's best for the battery, and what Tesla recommends. I charge to 80%, and don't let it drop below 60%, so most of the time recharge it above that. And when it's connected, we don't disconnect it until we're going to use the car. By the way, I'm not sure if I should keep the plug button pressed while pulling, or just tap it, and when I hear the noise, pull. I've been doing the latter, but the damn think relocks almost immediately, and I end up pulling when the lock engaged. Learning to do it quicker, but maybe I need to keep the button pressed while pulling. Need to give it a try, and see if the lock stays disengaged, or re-locks anyway.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,783
8,389
Boise, ID
By the way, I'm not sure if I should keep the plug button pressed while pulling, or just tap it, and when I hear the noise, pull. I've been doing the latter, but the damn think relocks almost immediately, and I end up pulling when the lock engaged. Learning to do it quicker, but maybe I need to keep the button pressed while pulling. Need to give it a try, and see if the lock stays disengaged, or re-locks anyway.
Yeah, just hold the button in while you pull it. Some people say they can have it stay unlocked for several seconds after just tapping the button, but as you have noticed, with your car, it re-locks immediately, and it does on my car too, so that quick button press just doesn't work for a lot of people. Holding the button in works for everyone all the time.
 
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elptxjc

Member
Dec 15, 2019
833
264
El Paso, TX
Holding the button in works for everyone all the time.
Perfect. Will tell that to my wife too. Thank you very much. Otherwise, you have to yank on the plug quite hard, and if the stupid lock engages, you could damage something. So better to pull steadily while pushing the button (it's maybe take 1/2-sec), to avoid any issues. Will try it tomorrow :).

Oh, and how about stopping the charge before pulling the plug? Is it better? Or it doesn't matter if you cut charging when you press the button, and immediately pull the plug? Thx.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,783
8,389
Boise, ID
Oh, and how about stopping the charge before pulling the plug? Is it better? Or it doesn't matter if you cut charging when you press the button, and immediately pull the plug? Thx.
When you push the button, it stops charging then unlocks the charge port so it is safe to remove the charge cord. Just hold the button.
Yeah, you can't cause a problem there. When you press that button while the car is connected, it is sending an interrupt signal on the communication pin, which the car responds to by cutting off the current and then releasing the locking latch, so when you hear that tiny half a second delay from when you press to when you hear the lock pin release, it is taking care of all that for you before you can pull it.
 
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KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,753
3,487
Maine
Most Tesla owners probably plug their cars in everyday as recommended by the manufacture and have never seen more than about 10 miles of phantom drain no matter how long the car may have been parked. Here is why. Unless things have changed, it is my understanding the charge level is topped off when the traction battery drops by around 3% or 10 miles for the 2018 LR Model 3. The car could have topped off the battery one or many times, while parked and plugged in, so the actual phantom drain would be hidden from the casual observer. If the in car displayed the date and times of the last 10 charge session, the owner would get a better understanding of the actual phantom drain or at least how many times the car topped off since the last driving session. I am hoping the new version 3 Tesla Wall Connector eventually helps owners better understand how much power is used by the plugged into vehicle. During these covid days many more Tesla cars are probably sitting in the garage plugged in for an extended periods of time.

If my logic is flawed, please feel free to enlighten me.

Regards
Stats, the app, shows my phantom drain. It’s less than 0.1miles/hr during the summer months, and about 0.4 miles/hr in Winter. Of course, sentry, smart summon, are off
10DAA773-2449-470D-9087-AA383FFBFD23.jpeg

that’s the monthly chart. About 0.25miles/hr at the moment.
 

rrolsbe

Member
Feb 18, 2017
245
135
Albuquerque
Does Stats consider the charging overhead phantom drain? Charging times would be longer in the winter if the battery requires heating to charge and the energy required for heating the battery could add a fair amount to the hourly average drain.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,753
3,487
Maine
Does Stats consider the charging overhead phantom drain? Charging times would be longer in the winter if the battery requires heating to charge and the energy required for heating the battery could add a fair amount to the hourly average drain.
Dunno, but you can always tweet the developer. @StatsTeslaApp
 

camalaio

Active Member
May 28, 2019
1,483
2,181
Vernon, BC, Canada
Does Stats consider the charging overhead phantom drain? Charging times would be longer in the winter if the battery requires heating to charge and the energy required for heating the battery could add a fair amount to the hourly average drain.

It does not, however some services can give rough visibility into that with "charging efficiency". As always though, the data they have access to is limited in resolution and shouldn't be very depended upon without understanding the limitations.
 

rrolsbe

Member
Feb 18, 2017
245
135
Albuquerque
Most Tesla owners probably plug their cars in everyday as recommended by the manufacture and have never seen more than about 10 miles of phantom drain no matter how long the car may have been parked. Here is why. Unless things have changed, it is my understanding the charge level is topped off when the traction battery drops by around 3% or 10 miles for the 2018 LR Model 3. The car could have topped off the battery one or many times, while parked and plugged in, so the actual phantom drain would be hidden from the casual observer. If the in car displayed the date and times of the last 10 charge session, the owner would get a better understanding of the actual phantom drain or at least how many times the car topped off since the last driving session. I am hoping the new version 3 Tesla Wall Connector eventually helps owners better understand how much power is used by the plugged into vehicle. During these covid days many more Tesla cars are probably sitting in the garage plugged in for an extended periods of time.

If my logic is flawed, please feel free to enlighten me.

Regards

After talking to friend, I have a few more thoughts regarding this thread. My friend owns a 2019 Model 3 AWD none performance. He recently started using Scan My Tesla SMT and had some interesting observations. He lives in the mountains and his car is parked in a garage with no insulation. He basically is seeing twice the energy usage to top off the 3% for the traction battery. Half of the energy is going towards heating the traction battery to allow charging and the other half in topping off the 3%. Technically the phantom drain did not double but the energy required to replenish that 3% did double. This of course would be hidden from the casual owner but adds to the cost of charging. Hopefully the new Wifi enable Tesla Wall Connector will get a firmware upgrade that would help an owner discover how much energy is being delivered through the WC.
 

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