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Research from Ford provides more proof that the Model S is better than most vehicles

Discussion in 'Model S' started by JRP3, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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  2. MikeL

    MikeL some guy

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    Very nice. I thought my old truck was feeling a little extra "flexible". Over loading it for a decade probably didn't help.
    And the Aluminum is dent resistant too, after heating !? That's great! Just choose your body shop wisely, or much preferably, don't ever need one.
    the Tesla chassis/frame, some body parts etc are steel. Do you know what's steel & what's Aluminum? How do they interface/attach?
     
  3. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    I think the dent resistance comes from the stamping process, "brake hardening". I think there is a steel reinforcing beam somewhere in the body, maybe the B pillar. I'd assume coated bolts and/or rivets, maybe a bead of adhesive as well, connects the steel and aluminum.
     
  4. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Enemy of the Status Quo

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    I think it is worth noting that technology has progressed and that the loss in Torsional rigidity of a 1992 Mercury Sable may not be representative of how today's cars fare.

    A Honda Civic, for example, uses 55% high-tensile steel in its structural components, and the body is undoubtedly assembled with much more advanced welding technology. Also, modern steel unibody frames are usually dipped multiple times in anti-corrosion coating. They don't rust and fall apart like Japanese cars in the 70's and 80's used to do when exposed to road salt.

    Some loss in structural integrity is inevitable given the stresses that cars are put through, but I don't think today's cars deteriorate 40% after 100k miles.
     

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