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Retrofit CCS compatibility onto earlier (NA) Model 3 - DIY approach

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I was one of the beta testers for the company that just released their CCS1 adapter in North America mentioned previously. I had it for just over 1 month, used it every 2-3 days and honestly it works like a charm. There is still some improvement that could be done with a safety pin or some similar safety mechanisms, but the majority of charging stations have plugs with integrated safety measures. I don’t think there’s any risk whatsoever. The only thing I dislike is their design. I hope they will change it or add some colors, other than that it does the job.
I’m happy to see people and companies work to bring aftermarket options to the community, feels like we are going the right direction.
 
I was one of the beta testers for the company that just released their CCS1 adapter in North America mentioned previously. I had it for just over 1 month, used it every 2-3 days and honestly it works like a charm. There is still some improvement that could be done with a safety pin or some similar safety mechanisms, but the majority of charging stations have plugs with integrated safety measures. I don’t think there’s any risk whatsoever. The only thing I dislike is their design. I hope they will change it or add some colors, other than that it does the job.
I’m happy to see people and companies work to bring aftermarket options to the community, feels like we are going the right direction.
I’m talking about A2Z EV SHOP and they didn’t pay me for the review or anything.
 
I'm using Tesla-branded CCS. I have a 2018 LR AWD. Would anyone know what could be wrong?
I've got no idea... I would first suspect the station, given the issues I'm always hearing about with CCS (and my personal experience with EVgo). "Communications errors" are incredibly uncommon, because the station doesn't usually tell you why it stopped.

I'd just say, test more... also a 2018 LR (but RWD) here, never having had much of an issue to report - though I also know the quirks of CCS and my habits are tuned to them. For example: I know that I can't stop/start a station rapidly - if the station is stopped, I'll give it several seconds to a minute to "clear its head" and retry, because of the multiple subsystems inside that don't always stay in sync together. But I rarely get stopped sessions.

Comms is just one single wire (and ground) for CCS - the other (prox) is an analog signal saying if the handle is present/if button is pressed. And that one wire doesn't really get-away very easily (long pin, long socket).
 
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I was one of the beta testers for the company that just released their CCS1 adapter in North America mentioned previously. I had it for just over 1 month, used it every 2-3 days and honestly it works like a charm. There is still some improvement that could be done with a safety pin or some similar safety mechanisms, but the majority of charging stations have plugs with integrated safety measures. I don’t think there’s any risk whatsoever. The only thing I dislike is their design. I hope they will change it or add some colors, other than that it does the job.
I’m happy to see people and companies work to bring aftermarket options to the community, feels like we are going the right direction.
This is good news. Always good to have an alternative. Are you seeing a similar charge curve as the Tesla OEM CCS1 adapter using a EA 350kWh charger? Peak at about 175-185kWh?
 
This is good news. Always good to have an alternative. Are you seeing a similar charge curve as the Tesla OEM CCS1 adapter using a EA 350kWh charger? Peak at about 175-185kWh?
The prototype they gave me was “locked” at 100kW. The adapter never went over 100kW which I was happy about because it respects the maximum power they said it has. I used Petro Canada charge stations which have a maximum power of 350kW and the adapter handled it like a champ. Their final version is to handle up to 150kW and they are apparently working on something over 250kW. Super excited for this tbh.

The curve was really similar to OEM’s. Most of charges I did were from 10% to 80% which took always between 23-27%.
The adapter never overheated and wasn’t hot after “full” charges. What I liked the most is the fact they thought about the lock indent on the adapter that prevents it from being stolen when you lock your vehicle, also their adapter locks perfectly with the CCS plug at charging stations. Other than that what can I say? It’s pretty much straight forward, it’s a pass through device with no electronic signature that passes the current from point A to point B. I’m impressed to be honest, these guys are going far. My wife owns the original Tesla adapter we share, but I think I will encourage them with this one. I’m not the 3rd party kind of guy but I’m get curious when it comes to my Tesla.
 

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The prototype they gave me was “locked” at 100kW. The adapter never went over 100kW which I was happy about because it respects the maximum power they said it has. I used Petro Canada charge stations which have a maximum power of 350kW and the adapter handled it like a champ. Their final version is to handle up to 150kW and they are apparently working on something over 250kW. Super excited for this tbh.

The curve was really similar to OEM’s. Most of charges I did were from 10% to 80% which took always between 23-27%.
The adapter never overheated and wasn’t hot after “full” charges. What I liked the most is the fact they thought about the lock indent on the adapter that prevents it from being stolen when you lock your vehicle, also their adapter locks perfectly with the CCS plug at charging stations. Other than that what can I say? It’s pretty much straight forward, it’s a pass through device with no electronic signature that passes the current from point A to point B. I’m impressed to be honest, these guys are going far. My wife owns the original Tesla adapter we share, but I think I will encourage them with this one. I’m not the 3rd party kind of guy but I’m get curious when it comes to my Tesla.
Thats with their 100kW prototype they gave me for testings. Final version that’s currently sold : 150kW.
Like said, they’re working on something that can reach more than 250kW. Only time will tell if they will achieve it, I really hope this is true. I’m tired of waiting months after Tesla to have something
 

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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,416
48,263
Oregon
The prototype they gave me was “locked” at 100kW. The adapter never went over 100kW which I was happy about because it respects the maximum power they said it has. I used Petro Canada charge stations which have a maximum power of 350kW and the adapter handled it like a champ. Their final version is to handle up to 150kW and they are apparently working on something over 250kW. Super excited for this tbh.
So it is an active adapter? (The only way they could limit the power.) Does it have a battery you need to keep charged like the Setec adapter? Does it have a USB port for firmware updates?

It’s pretty much straight forward, it’s a pass through device with no electronic signature that passes the current from point A to point B.

Well one of your two statements is false. It is either a passive adapter OR it is an active adapter that can limit the kW that passes through it... It can't be both.

Tesla's adapter is a passive adapter letting the car and EVSE negotiate the capabilities directly.
 
Thats with their 100kW prototype they gave me for testings. Final version that’s currently sold : 150kW.
Like said, they’re working on something that can reach more than 250kW. Only time will tell if they will achieve it, I really hope this is true. I’m tired of waiting months after Tesla to have something

How can a passive adapter lock to 100kw? Some sort of resistor that tells the car the adapter type maybe?

Also, I'm now hungry. Thanks. 🤣
 
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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,416
48,263
Oregon
How can a passive adapter lock to 100kw? Some sort of resistor that tells the car the adapter type maybe?
It can't. CCS uses digital communications to negotiate the charge rate. In looking at their site they do have a temperature kill device on it, that probably interrupts communications, if the adapter reaches 90* Celsius as a safety mechanism.
 
So it is an active adapter? (The only way they could limit the power.) Does it have a battery you need to keep charged like the Setec adapter? Does it have a USB port for firmware updates?



Well one of your two statements is false. It is either a passive adapter OR it is an active adapter that can limit the kW that passes through it... It can't be both.

Tesla's adapter is a passive adapter letting the car and EVSE negotiate the capabilities directly.
No battery, no usb plug.

I’m really a noob in electricity, I will ask them but they said something about copper purity, diameter of the block and pin sizes. I don’t wanna spread false informations and give them a bad reputation so I will ask them and get back to y’all. I should have listened more in the electricity classes I had 😂😂
 
That's all kinda scary (and scares me away from it, a bit, tbh), hearing this about it being "locked at" any specific kW value. kW isn't what limits an adapter - it's amps - and I'm worried about how they're speaking in kW terms instead of amps. Something fishy going on here. (sure, kW and amps are closely related within the same vehicle - but any designer/engineer tinkering with the design ought to be inclined to talk about amps, not watts)

Given their mechanism, perhaps, of breaking the CP line based on a thermal cutoff, that would mean it would stop charging with a fault if it overheats - it wouldn't just slow it down.

The CCS handle and the Tesla's charge port both have temperature sensors right at the tips - so I don't really think such sensing is necessary - but, hey, it may as well be there, if they've got the space. Just doesn't inspire confidence.

I'd worry that the kW limit was a result of thermal throttling on the car or station side... when they heat up, they don't "work at full speed or not work at all", they'll slow down first. Hmm...
 
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That's all kinda scary (and scares me away from it, a bit, tbh), hearing this about it being "locked at" any specific kW value. kW isn't what limits an adapter - it's amps - and I'm worried about how they're speaking in kW terms instead of amps. Something fishy going on here. (sure, kW and amps are closely related within the same vehicle - but any designer/engineer tinkering with the design ought to be inclined to talk about amps, not watts)

Given their mechanism, perhaps, of breaking the CP line based on a thermal cutoff, that would mean it would stop charging with a fault if it overheats - it wouldn't just slow it down.

The CCS handle and the Tesla's charge port both have temperature sensors right at the tips - so I don't really think such sensing is necessary - but, hey, it may as well be there, if they've got the space. Just doesn't inspire confidence.

I'd worry that the kW limit was a result of thermal throttling on the car or station side... when they heat up, they don't "work at full speed or not work at all", they'll slow down first. Hmm...
I side with you 100% but I don’t think there’s anything we should worry about. They simply decided to speak the language everyone understands. Most people won’t understand anything when you start speaking amps and volts. Regarding amps they mention 200A~150A. I think they are keeping a bit of secrets for themselves. Many people or companies would be very tempted to simply copy anyone’s work. I asked them about certifications and apparently it’s in the process. They will have certifications and that’s a plus. As for your question, it does slow down the same way Tesla’s adapter works. Again, I’m not well informed and I don’t like the fact that I’m maybe spreading FUD and people may run away from it because I said something that wasn’t right at all. I haven’t spoke any details or technicalities with them.
 
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It can't. CCS uses digital communications to negotiate the charge rate. In looking at their site they do have a temperature kill device on it, that probably interrupts communications, if the adapter reaches 90* Celsius as a safety mechanism.

IDK, it seems like its possible that there is some identification mechanism for adapters in the works? Obviously the car would have to be controlling the amp request itself, but maybe there is some identifying feature of the adapter? And they've already sorted this out with Tesla?

I obviously only have questions, but I'm not ready to assume that they are lying.
 
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