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Review: TSportline Lowering Springs

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by Victory, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. Victory

    Victory Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    United States
    Hi everyone,

    I purchased the TSportline lowering springs about 2 months ago and finally got around to installing them about 2 weeks ago. I gave the springs 2 weeks so they could settle + allow me some time to drive on them extensively prior to leaving a review. My car is a 2014 Model S 85 with stock coilover suspension.

    I originally chose to go with the coilover suspension because people on the forums mentioned that it had better overall performance and a less bouncy ride compared to the air suspension. After approximately 1 year of ownership, I didn't notice much difference when driving compared to my buddy's Model S with air suspension and I really didn't like how much gap there was between the fender and the wheel. In retrospect, I should've gotten the air suspension and added the lowering links. I got the TSportline springs for a) improved performance and b) improved aesthetics.

    Review:


    1. Ride quality: the ride quality after the install did not change at all. I believe the spring rates on the TSportline lowering springs are very similar to OEM. I could not notice any difference at all
    2. Handling in daily driving and spirited driving: as the car was marginally closer to the ground, it did feel like the cornering and handling was overall slightly better. Again, the drop was not extreme so the difference wasn't super noticable
    3. Rubbing: one concern I had before the install was that my wheels would rub my fender or when I turned. I am currently riding on 22x9.5 fronts and 22x10.5 rears so it was a real concern. However, I was relieved when my wheels did not rub at all after install
    4. Difference in range: none
    5. Overall: was fairly satisfied with the purchase. The springs made my car lower and look much better as it closed the fender/wheel gap. My only wish is that the springs would lower the car another .5 inches or so since I'm a big fan of the flush look. I suspect for most people on these forums, these springs will give you the perfect amount of drop.

    Some BEFORE photos:
    IMG_3086.JPG IMG_3088.JPG IMG_3090.JPG

    Directly after install:
    IMG_3102.JPG

    Today:
    11051950_10153577127266144_429863924229250405_o.jpg

    The install: I have a friendly shop that is willing to allow me to document the step-by-step process with photos of installing the springs. They took a look at my suspension and mentioned that the install was fairly simple process as the suspension was basically a Mercedes setup.

    First they jacked my car up and removed my wheels:
    IMG_3091.JPG IMG_3093.JPG

    The coilovers are bolted to the car through the frunk and the trunk. All they had to do was remove a couple plastic covers to access:
    IMG_3095.JPG

    Once the bolts were removed, they removed the front coilovers by detaching the sway bar and a few bolts.
    IMG_3094.JPG

    The rears were a tiny bit more tricky because I had to disable the parking brake before they were able to remove it
    IMG_3099.JPG

    Once removed, they compressed the springs, removed the top hat and installed the new springs in its place.
    IMG_3097.JPG IMG_3098.JPG

    As you can tell, the new springs aren't much shorter than the current and it has identical spring rates as the OEM springs
    IMG_3100.JPG

    Finally, they reinstalled the coilovers and put my wheels back on. The process took about 2 hours and my car was immediately about half an inch lower. Over the course of the next week, the car settled into the springs and lowered it by about .25-.5 inches more.


     

    Attached Files:

  2. NSX1992

    NSX1992 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2014
    Messages:
    253
    Location:
    Thousand Oaks,CA
    Thanks for all the pictures. Luckily Tesla talked me into getting the air suspension (p+ on P85D) and then I installed the lowering links for a 3/4" drop. On my 1992 NSX I had new coils installed for a 1" drop. On my 1962 Thunderbird I cut the front coils and installed lowering blocks for the rear leaf springs for a 2" drop.
     
  3. bryanle1

    bryanle1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Murrieta
    Do you know if aligning the car with be an issue with the lowered springs? I want to get max life out of the tires, thinking of going with 20's with the tsportline springs, but want to make sure there's enough adjustment available to get it properly aligned. Looking good by the way!
     
  4. Victory

    Victory Member

    Joined:
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    United States
    Hm, I don't see why they would have an issue with alignment. I've gotten alignment on my BMW that was completely slammed and it was a non-issue.

    And thanks :)
     
  5. 3mp_kwh

    3mp_kwh Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Location:
    Boston
    Shouldn't because it looks like the car landed near the 'Low'-'Normal' setting of the SAS. SAS uses different spring units. Since this lowering is within that range, alignment should not be a problem. I'm down at least this much, without re-aligning, and am actually not seeing a noticeable increase in wear. You gain about 1 degree negative camber, per inch of lowering.

    As far as I know, TSportline ordered its springs a little firmer perhaps to adjust for weight capacity. This is the benefit of the shorter-spring method, over re-ringing the lower spring perch, and using the stock springs. You have a little better defense to bottoming. Either way, since the car is lower you might want to go out with the heaviest load you envision carrying and trying to see if it bottoms, over the common routes you travel. You don't want any surprises.

    FWIW, I've found air is less bouncey over repaired asphalt. Coils are more accurate. I've felt comfortable putting the Model S close enough to curbs, and jersey barriers, that the auto-steer function tries to steer me away (which is kind of annoying, at speed). With air, I don't feel as comfortable taking the margins down to inches. I've owned both SAS and coil, at the same time.
     
  6. bryanle1

    bryanle1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Murrieta
    Thanks for the info. Just reading the horror stories of the past on difficulties of wheel alignment on a Model S and I didn't know if this would add to it. BTW, did you have it aligned yet? Just seeing if you got it back into spec.

    Thanks again!
     
  7. jcaspar

    jcaspar Member

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    Aug 19, 2013
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    Location:
    Sacramento
    I wonder where they jacked the car from to get it up on two jackstands on the same side? I don't think that is possible using the proper jack points unless you have stands that are incorporated into the jack.
     
  8. FlatSix911

    FlatSix911 918 Hybrid

    Joined:
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    Silicon Valley
    Victory, Nice write up and photos!
    Can you give an estimate of the spring cost and installation cost?
     
  9. Victory

    Victory Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    United States
    The springs are around $500 before shipping. The shop I went to did a lot of work for me in the past so they gave me a fairly good deal ($250) for the install
     

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