TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC

Road-rager's attorney mentions regenerative braking during case

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by yobigd20, Jan 21, 2016.

  1. Shawn Snider

    Shawn Snider Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Messages:
    243
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    I didn't read all the posts in this topic but a lot of you sound really angry, and a lot of you sound like you deal with ****-headed drivers that are impatient and just ream you out as they pass in the oncoming lane with their cellphone in hand doing their hair....

    Pretty sure the lights on the back of the vehicle are for a form of communication, those who RAGE when they see tailights blinking should A) Park their Car and GTFO of it, please! and B) Call a Taxi and go get some professional help.
     
  2. Ulmo

    Ulmo Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,834
    Location:
    Vienna Woods, Aptos, California
    I find this fascinating.

    1. It is, of course, bad to hurt anybody, including a cyclist.
    2. I hate having to deal with them on the road.
    3. Therefore, I safely leave roads they're on once I find out about them. For instance, I refuse to go on the mountain roads west of 280 during cycling hours (weekends, etc.). Live and let live.
    4. I would be horrified of having an accident with a cyclist.
    5. If a cyclist had an accident with me, I would be horrified by being attacked by other cyclists, or the cyclist who had the accident. There are many recent incidents when cyclists attacked motorists. So, I would instantly be afraid for my life as soon as any incident occurred. For my own safety, I would immediately dial 911 (most of those areas have no cell reception), and get out of danger, which means go a little distance and hide. Maybe change clothes, put on a hat, then return immediately to coordinate 911, do paperwork, etc.., close enough that I was considered "parked" but not "running away", and just tell everyone but law enforcement "I saw nothing and don't know who was driving" (tell law enforcement exactly what happened, well, hmm, lawyers say not to say anything which goes against my nature but in that case just exchange info and say nothing else).

    So, I would want to know exactly how far "not running away" is to get "out of sight of the cyclists" so they don't attack me, and I'd have to be hidden from view long enough to do a complete change of look so the cyclists don't think I'm a car driver, and I can be a "jogger" or something, one of their kin maybe. Pour some sweat on? Anything to stay alive.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I find this an odd and possibly wrong statement. I had three incidents yesterday when a driver caused me to do emergency braking to avoid hitting them because they moved without checking or whatever (trying to cause an accident?). In one of the cases, the driver was clearly so bad at driving at that moment, that they NEEDED TO BE aware of how bad they are, so that they can increase their safety level, so I honked very loudly and long. I wasn't admonishing them; I was informing them of their need to increase safety. How they executed that increase would be up to them: pull over and take a cab and get some sleep, stop talking to their passenger, stop texting, stop drinking alcohol, stop dancing, look over their shoulder, get a license, whatever, I don't care.

    My honk was CLEARLY informing them of an immediate danger: their driving.

    But how is the execution of my proper use of the horn different than your example of "admonishment"? I had nothing to admonish; I wasn't trying to prove anything. They needed to fix their driving immediately. Their driving was a clear and imminent threat to all around them and themselves.
     
  3. Nikxice

    Nikxice Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2014
    Messages:
    705
    Location:
    Hudson, NH
    Were you really attempting to improve driver safety by leaning on your horn to give other operators a lesson in driving? Sounds more like retaliation. By doing so, you could be escalating an already unhealthy situation involving a possible aggressive driver. What's to be gained? So, now that driver is looking back in their rear view mirror perceiving yet another aggressive driver following them. Not good. If another driver is operating erratically you can always take down their plate number and report them to the police. That's their job to handle, not ours.
     
  4. WMAC

    WMAC Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2015
    Messages:
    195
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Having to "Deal with them on the road" is no different than stopping at a stop light to let other traffic pass. Wait, take your turn and drive safely according to the law. It's not difficult at all.
     
  5. yo mama

    yo mama Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2015
    Messages:
    459
    Location:
    san jose, CA
    Easy for you to say - you're Canadian - and thus genetically polite and reasonable. Here in the USA we have a quasi-constitutional right to fly into irrational fits of rage for seemingly minor social infractions, whether real or imagined. If I recall correctly, the American war of independence all started because some English galleon cut off a colonial schooner. Viewed from that perspective, road rage is sort of an indelible quality that's woven into the fabric of our people.
     
  6. Shawn Snider

    Shawn Snider Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Messages:
    243
    Location:
    BC, Canada

    Well played good sir!
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.
  • Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


    SUPPORT TMC