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Roadster Parts for Sale Listings

drewski

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Supporting Member
Sep 22, 2019
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418
SF Bay Area
Based on the labelling, seems to be early Model S (before they changed the connector). Should still work on the roadster as the pinouts are similar.

P.S. Price is beyond ludicrous.



For a single CAN bus diagnostic tool (such as a laptop) to be able to connect individually to each of the four CAN buses in the car. Used by technicians to work on the car, as well as hackers to poke around and have fun.

marked as sold. wonder if they got their asking or went OBO
 

drewski

Member
Supporting Member
Sep 22, 2019
704
418
SF Bay Area
Based on the labelling, seems to be early Model S (before they changed the connector). Should still work on the roadster as the pinouts are similar.

P.S. Price is beyond ludicrous.



For a single CAN bus diagnostic tool (such as a laptop) to be able to connect individually to each of the four CAN buses in the car. Used by technicians to work on the car, as well as hackers to poke around and have fun.

this may be more useful to folks as it should allow connection to any ODBII reader. could be used to pass data to a HUD?

NOT MINE
(eBay link below)

Early Model S diagnostic port to OBDII adapter cable
Location: Salisbury, Connecticut
Price: $35 + $7 shipping
s-l1600.jpg
 

gregd

Active Member
Dec 31, 2014
2,600
1,819
CM98
this may be more useful to folks as it should allow connection to any ODBII reader. could be used to pass data to a HUD?

NOT MINE
(eBay link below)

Early Model S diagnostic port to OBDII adapter cable
Location: Salisbury, Connecticut
Price: $35 + $7 shipping
s-l1600.jpg
No. Electrically it might work, but the Roadster's diagnostic port CAN traffic is not OBDII, so no off-the-shelf OBDII diagnostic monitor will be able to decode the information. I would also be careful about injecting OBDII-formatted information polling frames into the Roadster's diagnostic port. Ideally they'd be ignored, but I wouldn't want to test that in a real car while driving down the highway.

The OVMSv3 can also act as an OBDII-compatible "ECU", allowing one to use a HUD (or most any OBDII monitor for that matter) in the Roadster. It has a translation process that maps the internal metrics into OBDII-formatted responses, so as the HUD polls for stuff like speed and "engine" RPM, the OVMSv3 responds with data it has collected from the car. Separate connector on the OVMSv3, separate CAN bus, totally firewalled from the car's operation. (Full disclosure, I'm the author of that code.)
 

drewski

Member
Supporting Member
Sep 22, 2019
704
418
SF Bay Area
No. Electrically it might work, but the Roadster's diagnostic port CAN traffic is not OBDII, so no off-the-shelf OBDII diagnostic monitor will be able to decode the information. I would also be careful about injecting OBDII-formatted information polling frames into the Roadster's diagnostic port. Ideally they'd be ignored, but I wouldn't want to test that in a real car while driving down the highway.

The OVMSv3 can also act as an OBDII-compatible "ECU", allowing one to use a HUD (or most any OBDII monitor for that matter) in the Roadster. It has a translation process that maps the internal metrics into OBDII-formatted responses, so as the HUD polls for stuff like speed and "engine" RPM, the OVMSv3 responds with data it has collected from the car. Separate connector on the OVMSv3, separate CAN bus, totally firewalled from the car's operation. (Full disclosure, I'm the author of that code.)

good to know. i knew the OVMS had the HUD fuctionality and thought this could be a slightly cheaper HUD solution for non-OVMS users.
 

gregd

Active Member
Dec 31, 2014
2,600
1,819
CM98
The description for this one (on eBay) is "Tesla-CAN-Diagnostic-Cable-2012-early-15-Crimped-OBD-II" and "This cable allows you to connect to your (2012-mid 2015 model year) Model S or Model X diagnostics port".

No use at all for Roadster.
And for anyone else browsing this thread, being able to connect to the port (even on a Model S) doesn't mean you can communicate anything meaningful. I doubt the Model S offers standard OBDII strings through their diagnostic port.

"Connect" is not the same as "converse". Some call it "sales marketing".
 
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Roadster

JdeMO Powered
Dec 10, 2016
1,609
1,331
SoCal
Henry Sharp CAN-JR for sale!

Xlnt condition, barely used and works exactly as expected (see photos). If you own a Roadster, you know this is a must-have accessory. It allows you to use any J1772 charger with your beloved car. Thx @hcsharp for developing and producing such a high grade product! Includes neoprene storage bag.

$585 USD + shipping (local pickup in L.A. welcomed)

PM if interested, thx.
SOLD.
 
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Roadrunner13

Member
Oct 16, 2013
404
158
Montreal
And for anyone else browsing this thread, being able to connect to the port (even on a Model S) doesn't mean you can communicate anything meaningful. I doubt the Model S offers standard OBDII strings through their diagnostic port.

"Connect" is not the same as "converse". Some call it "sales marketing".

You're right, ICE apps talking standard OBDII won't work with this cable BUT...
There are apps (TM-Spy & others) for Model S (and model 3) that know how to converse CAN via ODBII (bluetooth or wifi adapters) with this diagnostics cable. I have one for my Model S 2014 and it's fun, you get all sort of similar data as with OVMS.
 
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markwj

Asia Pacific
Moderator
Apr 10, 2011
4,637
1,308
Hong Kong
You're right, ICE apps talking standard OBDII won't work with this cable BUT...
There are apps (TM-Spy & others) for Model S (and model 3) that know how to converse CAN via ODBII (bluetooth or wifi adapters) with this diagnostics cable. I have one for my Model S 2014 and it's fun, you get all sort of similar data as with OVMS.

Yes, in a Model S/X/3/Y these adaptor cable are fun. They wire out one single CAN bus to the standard OBDII CAN pins, and allow you to plugin a normal OBDII dongle running in Monitor-All mode to capture all network traffic. Works well, as the Model S/X/3/Y bus used runs at 500kbps.

But in the Tesla Roadster the equivalent bus is at 1Mbps, and normal OBDII devices won't work at that speed (due to limitations in the ELM327/STN1110 chipset they all use). Really not worth wasting your money on one of these cables for a Roadster.
 
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markwj

Asia Pacific
Moderator
Apr 10, 2011
4,637
1,308
Hong Kong
Yes, as I said, I misinterpreted your post regarding pinouts.

Just re-read this, and I see the misunderstanding.

The first cable (the one with four connectors) was a standard part for Tesla Roadster technicians. This one seems to be labelled for Model S, but the four buses are on the same connector pins, so pinouts equivalent. The OVMS cable for this is marked as 'Early Teslas' and works for Roadster as well as early Model S. If you have a single CAN bus analyser that works up to 1Mbps, this is a pretty useful tool for both Roadster and early S. But, the price is ludicrous. You could make it up yourself without any soldering for less than US$30 in parts. If anyone needs details, message me.

The second one is to attach an OBDII dongle to an early Model S. Sure, the pinout is the same (for that one bus), but the OBDII dongle simply won't work on the Roadster (not even in Monitor-All mode).
 

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