Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Roadway water

BeccaM3

Member
Feb 7, 2018
32
15
Portland
It's February and pouring rain in my area. On the way to work this morning, I had to drive across a section of road that probably had 6 inches of rainwater. Is there a guideline for how much water you can drive through?
 

Electric700

Active Member
May 21, 2013
1,695
359
Florida, United States
Driving through water can be dangerous, especially if you're not familiar with the section that's under water and if there's a water current. It doesn't take much for you to lose traction, where your car can be swept away.

It's best to take another route if you can, or turn around. If you absolutely must proceed, I would recommend the water not be higher than the start of the bottom-center section of the car.

That being said, your battery pack is sealed so water shouldn't be able to get in. Be safe out there!
 
  • Like
Reactions: BeccaM3

BeccaM3

Member
Feb 7, 2018
32
15
Portland
Driving through water can be dangerous, especially if you're not familiar with the section that's under water and if there's a water current. It doesn't take much for you to lose traction, where your car can be swept away.

It's best to take another route if you can, or turn around. If you absolutely must proceed, I would recommend the water not be higher than the start of the bottom-center section of the car.

Should have been more clear. It's on a city road in the middle of town, no chance of getting swept away. The city rainwater drainage can't keep up with the amount of rain so it's filling the road. Will it damage the car (battery?) if the water reaches the undercarriage of the car?
 

PoitNarf

My dog's breath smells like dog food
Jun 7, 2016
2,867
4,006
NJ
What you also need to watch out for is driving through puddles at a decent speed. Many here including myself have had the aero shield below the car get ripped due to excess water and poor design of that part. The water quickly gets on top of and weighs down on the aero shield, which is just a reinforced piece of fabric it seems, and since it does not have proper drainage so as a result it rips.
 

ewoodrick

Well-Known Member
Apr 13, 2018
5,285
3,722
Buford, GA
Should have been more clear. It's on a city road in the middle of town, no chance of getting swept away. The city rainwater drainage can't keep up with the amount of rain so it's filling the road. Will it damage the car (battery?) if the water reaches the undercarriage of the car?

I hate to disagree, but those situations that you refer to are indeed when cars get washed away and people killed. You think that there is no current, but the reality is that there is often a current flow with the water going somewhere that it is not supposed to.

Lots of answers to your query. Car's will float with only a few inches of water, and a single inch dramatically decreases your friction (and stability) on the road.
Can you get the battery wet, yes. I wouldn't really suggest going above the top of the battery.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: C141medic

Petrlol

Member
Oct 16, 2018
399
537
Ohio
If we're talking about a residential road with 0 chance of being swept away... I would still be concerned about ripping the undercarriage felt. I so wish they'd just give us all a new piece...
 

BeccaM3

Member
Feb 7, 2018
32
15
Portland
Funny. I had the same issue this morning.

My rule of thumb is if it's deep enough to touch the bottom of the undercarriage, I try to find another way around, if possible.

Looks like you're in Portland too. Gotta love this weather.

If we're talking about a residential road with 0 chance of being swept away... I would still be concerned about ripping the undercarriage felt. I so wish they'd just give us all a new piece...

Yep, residential road with zero chance of being swept away. Water is collecting in the low point in the road. Hopefully, the water drains by the time I get off work because there is only 1 way out and it's through the water.
 

Garlan Garner

Banned
Mar 31, 2016
11,351
6,062
Chicagoland
It's February and pouring rain in my area. On the way to work this morning, I had to drive across a section of road that probably had 6 inches of rainwater. Is there a guideline for how much water you can drive through?

Rule of thumb....if you can touch an alligator - its too much. New Bio-hazard defense upgrade needed.


hqdefault.jpg
 

JasontheBeaver

Jason Barker
Jan 11, 2018
381
359
Beaverton, Oregon
I'm in the Portland area too and here's what we've been noticing at our detail business...
Like mentioned above, the aero caps come off pretty easily when driving through deep water.
Also like mentioned above, the under-tray is especially susceptible to damage from bottoming out or hitting deep water at speed.
We've already been getting calls to deal with lightly flooded Tesla interiors from the Model X FWDs leaking excessive amounts and pooling water inside, saturating under the carpet, and Model 3s and Ss leaking into the trunk and building up enough water to work its way under the front carpeting. A couple Model 3s also leaking from the excessive water coming down the windshield and down the firewall area, that drain gets plugged very easily with all our pine needles and leaves around here. Usually not noticed during "normal" weather until we get this kind of continuous downpour.
I recommend Model 3 owners keeping that front drain clear and/or even enlarging the drain hole.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top