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Rocky Mountains Range Anxiety

Discussion in 'Model X' started by DrivingRockies, Aug 21, 2016.

  1. DrivingRockies

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    Good morning,

    I ordered a Model X a few days ago, and have been drilling down on some time and range calculations.

    I often make a trip from Fort Collins, CO to Salt Lake, UT. Current superchargers require a trip over I-70. Having ordered the 60D, and looking at winter temperatures and driving over mountains, it appears I can't make it to the first supercharger in Silverthorn. This is based off of evtripplanner. Has anyone had experience with a similar route that can ease my mind?
     
  2. cpa

    cpa Member

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    It might be a little close in winter with very cold temperatures. I will let another more experienced driver in cold climates reply with better information. A key to cold weather driving to maximize distance is to use the bun warmers in the seats over the cabin heater. The cabin heater sucks a lot of energy and can impact distance materially.

    EVTripplanner says that during temperate times the trip down Interstate 25 and west on I70 is easy.
     
  3. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker Beta Tester

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    #3 MorrisonHiker, Aug 21, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2016
    Another thing to watch for is the potential new Supercharger along I-25 in the Thornton area. I recently found the documentation submitted for the Lincoln, Nebraska Supercharger which shows several new locations along I-25, I-76 and I-80. At the Tesla event in Avon on Friday, the Tesla employee said that they are going to compete the gaps on I-80 this year.

    While you probably wouldn't need the Thornton location in warmer weather, it could allow you to recharge before heading up I-70 in colder temperatures.

    Here's an image @Chuq made combining the existing Supercharger map with those locations shown on the Lincoln application paperwork.
    [​IMG]
     
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    • Informative x 1
  4. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    in winter those climbs will be taxing your capacity to the max, I charged 25-30% more than the trip planner in the car called for, and sometimes the extra range was needed
     
  5. DougH

    DougH Active Member

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    Do you think the 75 would have been a better buy now?
     
  6. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend that if at all possible you change your order to a 75 since you live in a mountainous region with very cold winters.
     
  7. electracity

    electracity Active Member

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    The wind on that I80 section of wyoming during winter can be extreme.
     
  8. kort677

    kort677 Active Member

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    that all depends on your driving patterns, if it is to be mostly a daily driver you'll probably be ok, if you plan on making many trips over the mountains maybe you should upgrade.
     
  9. Hitman007

    Hitman007 Member

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    I would not recommend it. I spend a lot of time in Montana and Colorado in the winter and the cold temperatures can be extreme. I would get a 90D if that is your typical driving pattern. In fact if you live in any of the mountainous western states with cold winters I would get nothing less than a 75 but a 90 would be best.
     
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  10. Noneduck

    Noneduck Member

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    I agree with the previous posts. You will need more energy than you think. Your actual range will be lower than the rated range. I needed to charge an extra 25%-30% traveling at highway speeds over the continental divide yesterday, and was even more disappointed by my energy use in the winter. Get the 75 at least.
     
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  11. DrivingRockies

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    Thanks for all the info, especially the added charger in Denver, that reduces my worry a bit. A quick stop there would be well advised in the winter for sure. The extra 25% is a good suggestion as well for a buffer. I'm definitely looking forward to the delivery!

    Regularly is a few times a year for me. Definitely not super regular. Thanks for the advice!

    Noneduck - What vehicle do you have?
     
  12. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    Keep in mind, a current 60 is actually a limited 75. So you always have the option of paying more money and unlocking the extra capacity later if you find you need it.
     
  13. Noneduck

    Noneduck Member

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    Mine is a S 90D
     
  14. DougH

    DougH Active Member

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    I could not justify the cost jump from a 75 to 90.
     
  15. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    If you're driving in the winter in the mountains, the 60D is not the appropriate choice.
     
  16. jackbowers

    jackbowers Jack Bowers

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    I did a lot of mountainous driving in my X last winter. It's very common to see consumption of 500 Wh/mile, and turning off the heater doesn't help much because torque sleep switches off in freezing temperatures, causing the drivetrain to use 10-15% more power. Also, you can expect to consume 8 miles of range for each 1000' elevation gain, and recover 7 miles of range for each 1000' decline.
     
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  17. Jeff Andrews

    Jeff Andrews Member

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    I had an original 60 Model S when I lived in Denver. It's EPA range was 208 miles. I made many trips over the Rockies with no problems, many times during snow storms (please be sure to use proper winter tires!! I can't stress this enough). You may not be able to drive as fast as some traffic, but I was definitely comfortable at speed limits. I had to stop at every Supercharger, and charge for longer than Tesla advertises, but it's definitely doable. Would definitely be more comfortable with a larger battery pack, but I wouldn't be worried.
     
  18. BigMskiman

    BigMskiman Member

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    Concur with the 75D or 90D since yer still in the order window. If that trip turns out to be easy, there'll still be another anxiety ride in your future you can't avoid.......like if a charging station is down, or a road detour happens.
     
  19. ReddyLeaf

    ReddyLeaf Member

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    One benefit of the 60D (with the software-limited 75 KWh battery) is that you can charge to 100% all of the time, plus it charges faster than the old 60. However, Wind/Snow/Cold will drop your range by 20-50%. If you rarely do long drives in the winter, then it won't be very inconvenient to spend a little more time, stop for a level 2 charge to top up. However, if you're a serious winter lover or skier, then I'd recommend the 75D.
     

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