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rust on control arm "disc" (Front right / left) - normal?

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by texas_star_TM3, Jan 6, 2020.

?

normal or not?

  1. yes - i have that too

    10 vote(s)
    83.3%
  2. never seen it

    2 vote(s)
    16.7%
  1. texas_star_TM3

    Joined:
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    Texas
    rust.JPG

    normal? car is 8/1 delivery and garage parked in North Texas ... so not much rain or humidity and merely 5 months old / 6k miles. I doubt the disc is super important and will last - just sticks out as the only rusted part there....
     
  2. texas_star_TM3

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  3. KenC

    KenC Active Member

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    I hope it's "normal" since mine is more rusty than yours. 10 months old in pic:
    IMG_3552.jpeg
     
  4. 03DSG

    03DSG Active Member

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    Ontario
    Surface rust on the edge of a bushing washer/spacer/shim. Pretty normal.
     
    • Like x 2
  5. texas_star_TM3

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    Texas
    whatever that washer/ spacer/ shim does... it better *not* be important. because given status at 5 months / 10 months... that thing will be crumbled up and gone after a few years...
     
  6. Jymmybob

    Jymmybob Member

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    That's the end of the outer housing of the control arm bushing. It's not as serious as it looks because the important part is the bond to the rubber which naturally is protected by the rubber except on the edges. You will get the rubber peeling back over time but apparently whoever has design responsibly at Tesla thinks the control arm will need replacement for other reasons before the corrosion penetrates too far down the edges or outside.

    It's probably phosphated if anything but coating those parts can be notoriously hard since they have to either be coated after bonding or have a coating that withstands the bonding process without hurting the bond itself. Either way it's surprisingly expensive and difficult compared to a similar size part so they just went with nothing or phosphate (which is basically nothing for underbody corrosion protection). It's press-fit into the arm so that will help a little on the outer side and you can see the other end poking out in the interior of the arm in other pictures of those assemblies. There's also a chance it's plated but poorly spec'ed so it failed immediately but that'd be worse than just not coating it considering the wasted effort involved.

    I've done a significant amount of work on this specific type part for multiple OEM's and Tier 1's in a previous life so it's a fun exercise to see what Tesla's up to.
     
    • Informative x 3
  7. jedi2b

    jedi2b Member

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    Montreal, Qc
    my car is mid june 2019 and those bushings are a lot more rusted than yours, but it looks superficial and it's sandwiched between two rubber bushings, so doesn't look worrysome
     
  8. wdskuk

    wdskuk Member

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    Location:
    Orland Park, IL
    Maybe spray some FluidFilm on those rusted bushings to help protect it. I noticed the rust on these bushings of my Model 3 a month into owning it and with this fluid film on it it hasn't gotten any worse. This fluidfilm spray does wonder on metal parts that tends to rust.
     
    • Like x 1
  9. texas_star_TM3

    Joined:
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    Texas

    Fluid Film can attack rubber parts/ synthetic rubber parts and harden them/ make them brittle over time if you are unlucky. probably not worth risking it and spray that stuff right on the rubber / metal assembly.
     
    • Like x 1
  10. hridge2020

    hridge2020 Member

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    Possible dissimilar metals:
    Dissimilar Metals in Contact
    Hot-dip galvanized steel is well suited for use in a variety of environments and fabrications, and sometimes is placed in contact with different metals including, among others, stainless steel, aluminum, copper and weathering steel.

    When two different metals are in contact in a corrosive environment, one of the metals experiences accelerated galvanic corrosion while the other metal remains galvanically protected.

    Metals near each other in the galvanic series have little effect on each other. Generally, as the separation between metals in the series increases, the corroding effect on the metal higher in the series increases as well.

    [​IMG]
    Relative surface areas of contacting dissimilar metals is also relevant in determining which metal exhibits accelerated corrosion. It is undesirable to have a large cathode surface in contact with a relatively small anode surface.

    Galvanic corrosion occurs when two different metals are in contact in a corrosive environment: one of the metals experiences an accelerated corrosion rate. The contacting metals form a bimetallic couple because of their different affinities (or attraction) for electrons. These different affinities create an electrical potential between the two metals, allowing current to flow.
     
  11. jim0266

    jim0266 Member

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    akron., ohio
    From their FAQ
    FLUID FILM has no adverse effects on plastics. Caution should be used around non oil-resistant rubber goods. May cause swelling.

    Would any of the rubber parts on the Model 3 where you might spray Fluid Film not be oil resistant?
     

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