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Ryan Shaw got his Model Y detailed and ceramic-coated


Interesting video. Based on this, whenever I eventually get my own Model Y, here's my plan:
  1. Take it to a detailer first and pay them to list all of the defects, on paper. Why? Because they're going to be better at catching them than I ever will, and I'll be paying them for more work later, anyhow.
  2. Complain to Tesla about any significant defects. This includes uneven body panel gaps, noises, and things just plain not fitting and/or not working. This does not include paint issues: I don't trust Tesla to fix them as opposed to making them worse.
  3. Once the car is back from Tesla, pay the detailer to confirm that the issues that were supposed to be fixed actually got fixed. If not, complain again to Tesla until they are.
  4. Now that Tesla's done with it, have the detailer cover the car with PPF and ceramic coating, after paint correction.
  5. ???
  6. PROFIT!!!
What do you think?
 

JD M3

Member
Aug 31, 2018
96
164
Los Angeles
I think that's ridiculous. Spend $60k+ on car and then do QC. Nobody's got time for that. Juts get something different.

Agree. This seems to fall more into the category of OCD rather than practical or useful. When you first pick up your car, they give you as much time as you want to look it over for defects. Spend a lot of time looking it over very carefully and let them know if there are any defects that you identify. If you can't see anything after a thorough inspection it's not worth having a detailer comb over it in fine detail. Other than perhaps detailers, no one else is going to notice anything that you didn't didn't notice after a thorough close up inspection. Not to mention the fact that Tesla likely wont be willing to fix the defects for free anyway if you accept the car and drive off the lot and then show up later reporting defects. For all they know, you could've caused those defects on your own after you left the lot. Particularly things like paint chips, etc.
 
Look it over if there is something you don't like get it fixed. Then drive it for the next 3 to 10 years, sell it and move on. Its just a normal car. I see a lot of people spending a bunch of time and money to fix something they will not even own in three years. This is not a 1955 300SL or a fine collectible.
It's a normal car except that it's not. Not in price, not in performance, not in technological sophistication. And, despite being priced like a luxury car, it's likely to have a worse paint job than my regular Nissan.

I want to fix what they got wrong and lock in those fixes. That's why I'm planning on the paint correction, paint protection film, and ceramic coating.
 

tcoombes

Active Member
Supporting Member
Jan 22, 2018
1,071
3,468
Northern California
It's a normal car except that it's not. Not in price, not in performance, not in technological sophistication. And, despite being priced like a luxury car, it's likely to have a worse paint job than my regular Nissan.

I want to fix what they got wrong and lock in those fixes. That's why I'm planning on the paint correction, paint protection film, and ceramic coating.

I did that with my Model S. I went straight from SC delivery to detailer for paint correction and ceramic coating. Best decision I could have made and will do it again on my next Tesla.
 
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Agree. This seems to fall more into the category of OCD rather than practical or useful. When you first pick up your car, they give you as much time as you want to look it over for defects. Spend a lot of time looking it over very carefully and let them know if there are any defects that you identify. If you can't see anything after a thorough inspection it's not worth having a detailer comb over it in fine detail. Other than perhaps detailers, no one else is going to notice anything that you didn't didn't notice after a thorough close up inspection. Not to mention the fact that Tesla likely wont be willing to fix the defects for free anyway if you accept the car and drive off the lot and then show up later reporting defects. For all they know, you could've caused those defects on your own after you left the lot. Particularly things like paint chips, etc.

I have good reason to expect there to be more defects than is normal for a new car, especially one in that price range. I don't expect that I'll be able to notice them all when I first inspect it; I'll likely get caught up on the more obvious ones. By the time I see it in good light without those distractions, I'll find more problems but it'll be too late to get Tesla to fix them.

Perhaps if I had years of experience detailing cars, along with the tools needed to measure paint thickness and panel gaps, I'd be the right person to inspect the car and know what to demand from Tesla. But I don't and I'm not. I do have some money, enough to buy the car, enough to hire the expertise, enough to make the car what it should have been and keep it that way.

I want to spend that money wisely, and I don't consider dropping $75k on a car with a worse paint job than my old Nissan to be wise. If there was some other company that offered all that Tesla does but did it without this flaw, I'd buy from them, instead. But there isn't, so the best I can do is get a Tesla and plan to remediate it.

As I mentioned above, I don't expect Tesla to be competent at fixing the paint and finish, so I'm not going to ask them to. I will, however, want them to adjust panels that don't fit properly or have uneven gaps. I definitely want them to fix problems like the back seats not going down when the button is pressed or excessive noise when the HVAC system is on or any damage to the interior. These aren't vague concerns; they're actual problems that multiple owners have discovered and Tesla has generally made good.

So that's why I'm not crazy to plan to have it detailed and protected. You don't have to care about these things. Nobody said you had to go through the same process. Nobody even said you had to buy a Tesla. Maybe you'll be happy in a traditional, low-tech gas-burner.
 
youtubers want your attention & detailers want your money: you got hooked up by both. I got my model 3 Ceramic coated and I'm not going to do that for my MY.
Detailers do want my money, and I'm willing to give it to them if they earn it. In the perfect world, the Tesla would arrive without significant defects and be at least coated with ceramic. But we don't live in that world, so we have to make do. I don't begrudge people the money they make for doing work for me that I couldn't do myself.

As for YTers, I'm pretty sure he spent more on that work than he'll ever make from one more video.
 
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Just do your own research on products and installers. Due diligence and examples of work - don’t let others sell you, seek out whoever you choose. My detailer was excellent and my car looks like new after 2 years. No swirls, no chips, no glass cracks, perfect shine, easy clean and maintenance.
It's always good advice to shop around and make your own decision instead of swallowing a salesman's line.

Having said that, even if the car arrives immaculate, I'm going to want to protect it with film and coating.
 
Remember these YouTube guys get hundreds a month income from their channel.

Personally? I’m going to look at it and note any glaring errors and then do my usual. I like the TurtleWax Ceramic Spray and that will be good enough.
Ceramic coating is great for repelling water and protecting from UV. It doesn't replace paint correction, much less film.
 
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You should consider Dynamat since you will probably want it as quiet as a Maxima (at a steady 70 mph we measured 66 decibels) also. It will kill some of the excess road noise.

How did you get it to $75K?

Total
Car Price$72,290.00
Amount Due$77,924.48
Includes taxes, fees, order fee and payments

Pricing Details
Car Price $72,290.00
Full Self-Driving Capability $7,000.00
Autopilot Included
Performance Brakes Included
Dual Motor All-Wheel Drive Included
All Black Premium Interior Included
Red Multi-Coat $2,000.00
Premium Interior Included
Model Y $41,000.00
21’’ Überturbine Wheels Included
Carbon Fiber Spoiler Included
Long Range All-Wheel Drive Performance $19,990.00
Performance Pedals Included
Performance Upgrade Included
Five Seat Interior Included
Tow Hitch $1,000.00
Destination Fee $1,125.00
Documentation Fee $75.00
Order fee $100.00
Taxes & Fees $5,734.48
Sales Tax $5,602.48
Tire Fee $10.00
Registration/Transfer/Titling Fees $122.00
Payment 02/23/2020 -$100.00
Amount Due
$77,924.48
 

jasonLA

Member
Aug 8, 2017
122
98
Los Angeles

Interesting video. Based on this, whenever I eventually get my own Model Y, here's my plan:
  1. Take it to a detailer first and pay them to list all of the defects, on paper. Why? Because they're going to be better at catching them than I ever will, and I'll be paying them for more work later, anyhow.
  2. Complain to Tesla about any significant defects. This includes uneven body panel gaps, noises, and things just plain not fitting and/or not working. This does not include paint issues: I don't trust Tesla to fix them as opposed to making them worse.
  3. Once the car is back from Tesla, pay the detailer to confirm that the issues that were supposed to be fixed actually got fixed. If not, complain again to Tesla until they are.
  4. Now that Tesla's done with it, have the detailer cover the car with PPF and ceramic coating, after paint correction.
  5. ???
  6. PROFIT!!!
What do you think?
First off... Why are attacking a YouTuber that is truly trying to help others?!? No one understands where you are coming from at all. Ryan has helped us all through the Tesla Model Y journey. I think this video is truly one of his best as it gave everyone including you insight on how this work is performed. I personally have had this done to all of my cars and never have experienced the process from start to finish. So Ryan helped us all and actually showed us. No need to attack people that give you content. Please don’t respond you will not get a reply.
 

Wennfred

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 4, 2019
3,052
2,141
San Diego
I’ve been a fan of Ryan Shaw for about 6 Months now and he puts out great content especially what he did to get his Model Y quicker. I’ve also leaned a lot from his videos as he is very detail on his reviews. The paint correction he had done and all of the work that went into it is amazing and should be done once a year if you don’t have anything on it like ceramic coating. I’m going to check with the a few companies here in San Diego or the one that did my Xpel PPF and have them do a paint correction. It’s been a year and a month now so it needs it for sure.

Fred
 
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