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Safe Powerboard or Double Adapter for Universal Mobile Connector

Hi,

I have an M3 and a garage with only one power point. Right now that power point charges the electric garage door.

I’d like also to be able to use that PowerPoint to charge my M3 using the Universal Mobile Connector.

Is there a safe powerboard or double adapter I can buy that will allow me to charge my M3 and occasionally open and close the garage without accidentally setting fire to things?

I had heard a power board with a good 10A power board may work?

Thanks very much,

Rohan.
 
May not be easy in this instance as it connects to a building breaker, rather than one for my specific apartment. Any other options?
Something like this might suit. Provides a 1.8 meter lead that should be beefier than your typical household extension lead. And two double power points with RCD protection, actually looking again RCBO, even better.
This may be overkill but possibly the easiest way to have some confidence in the 10A solid draw.
 
Forgot to say, it's 'Tesla' branded, what can go wrong!?

tesla_power_board.png
 
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moa999

2020 3 SR+ MSM
Mar 4, 2020
2,577
2,793
Sydney, AUS
May not be easy in this instance as it connects to a building breaker, rather than one for my specific apartment. Any other options?
I'd also ensure you have permission to charge your car off common power.
It's a quick way to upset the neighbours/ owners com.

Occasional use for a vacuum cleaner or tyre pump very different to hours charging..
And quite likely you'll find 10-20 10A plugs all running off the same breaker.
 
Last edited:
I'd also ensure you have permission to charge your car off common power.
It's a quick way to upset the neighbours/ owners com.

Occasional use for a vacuum cleaner or tyre pump very different to hours charging..
And quite likely you'll find 10-20 10A plugs all running off the same breaker.
But really though? Most people would not even know that this could be a thing. That the power in my garage is not mine.

I have a car, I have a 'charger', I have a plug(socket!), I plugs it in.

I guess when the second electric car comes along on the same circuit then the problem will be resolved or not.
 
But really though? Most people would not even know that this could be a thing. That the power in my garage is not mine.

I have a car, I have a 'charger', I have a plug(socket!), I plugs it in.

I guess when the second electric car comes along on the same circuit then the problem will be resolved or not.
Most people work out that they are paying for something for someone else
 
Most people work out that they are paying for something for someone else
Yeah, having spent some time in a strata schema or two over the years - I give you about a week until the neighbours cotton on to how you are charging.

The strata budget will be set to cover the shared power points for the occasional vacuum, power tool or running the garage doors. But pulling down 20+kWh every night will not go under the radar.
 
Yeah, having spent some time in a strata schema or two over the years - I give you about a week until the neighbours cotton on to how you are charging.
At that point OP may as well call a sparky in to fit a double powerpoint and a check meter so the strata can charge the power back to him. And depending how petty the neighbours are, a lockable isolator too.
 
I'd also ensure you have permission to charge your car off common power.
It's a quick way to upset the neighbours/ owners com.

Occasional use for a vacuum cleaner or tyre pump very different to hours charging..
And quite likely you'll find 10-20 10A plugs all running off the same breaker.
There are a bunch of different assumptions in here which aren't accurate - the meters are located next to the garage and every single one seems to have an apartment number written on it. I don't expect to be using common strata power.
 
There are a bunch of different assumptions in here which aren't accurate - the meters are located next to the garage and every single one seems to have an apartment number written on it. I don't expect to be using common strata power.
Note I went and reviewed the power setup following my original post, which thankfully, was different to expectation.
 
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There are a bunch of different assumptions in here which aren't accurate - the meters are located next to the garage and every single one seems to have an apartment number written on it. I don't expect to be using common strata power.
OP: I have an M3 and a garage with only one power point. Right now that power point charges the electric garage door.
I’d like also to be able to use that PowerPoint to charge my M3 using the Universal Mobile Connector.
 

moa999

2020 3 SR+ MSM
Mar 4, 2020
2,577
2,793
Sydney, AUS
May not be easy in this instance as it connects to a building breaker, rather than one for my specific apartment. Any other options?
The assumption came from this statement about the building breaker.

All depends on the size of the MDU and likely what makes sense for cabling.
Smaller ones may have garage power sockets that connect to your own meter.

Larger ones will have apartment meters on every floor, and the garage and foyers and lifts/ stairwells on common power.

Be thankful if you are connected to your own meter because it generally makes things easier.
 
The assumption came from this statement about the building breaker.

All depends on the size of the MDU and likely what makes sense for cabling.
Smaller ones may have garage power sockets that connect to your own meter.

Larger ones will have apartment meters on every floor, and the garage and foyers and lifts/ stairwells on common power.

Be thankful if you are connected to your own meter because it generally makes things easier.
Yep - agreed on all fronts
 

cafz

Active Member
Jul 17, 2020
1,523
1,595
Australia
Note I went and reviewed the power setup following my original post, which thankfully, was different to expectation.
If it's on your own circuit, you should definitely get an electrician to wire up a separate socket for charging rather than using the adaptor. Each plug/socket in the path is a potential site for an unsound connection to develop, which will heat up under sustained high load.

The Tesla UMC has a temperature sensor in the plug, which lets it throttle or interrupt charging if there's too much heat being generated at the socket. Using an adaptor like that, it won't be able to protect the connection between the adaptor and the wall socket. (This is one reason why the Tesla manual strongly advises against using extension cords).
 
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If it's on your own circuit, you should definitely get an electrician to wire up a separate socket for charging rather than using the adaptor. Each plug/socket in the path is a potential site for an unsound connection to develop, which will heat up under sustained high load.

The Tesla UMC has a temperature sensor in the plug, which lets it throttle or interrupt charging if there's too much heat being generated at the socket. Using an adaptor like that, it won't be able to protect the connection between the adaptor and the wall socket. (This is one reason why the Tesla manual strongly advises against using extension cords).
Very helpful, thanks. Sounds like the right medium term answer!
 

Vostok

Active Member
Jul 1, 2017
2,756
3,272
Sydney
The Tesla UMC has a temperature sensor in the plug, which lets it throttle or interrupt charging if there's too much heat being generated at the socket. Using an adaptor like that, it won't be able to protect the connection between the adaptor and the wall socket. (This is one reason why the Tesla manual strongly advises against using extension cords).

Wise advice, although I confess that I do occasionally use an extension lead - but you need to buy the correct one.

I purchased an industrial strength 10A, 10m extension lead that is rated for 15A continuous draw. It has a red and black sheath rather than orange, and a snib on the socket end to clamp the UMC plug firmly into position to maintain full prong contact and prevent accidental dislodgment.

I would not use any other kind of extension lead with the UMC.

I’ve used this extension lead on a few occasions to trickle charge my car overnight when staying at cabins far, far away from public chargers and often these places do not have outdoor power points or power points close to where you might be able to park you car. Or if they do have outdoor power points, you might still need an extension lead because the UMC cable is not long enough. I fully uncoil the extension lead before use.

I’ve had no issues with either the extension lead or the plugs at either end even getting warm after 8 hours of continuous use. On the occasions I have done this, I do a test charge for a few hours when awake to periodically check the cabin socket end is not overheating (which could be a problem if the socket was poorly installed by the original sparky). So you do need to be aware of the risks and always be cautious and vigilant.
 
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