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Saying Hello From L.A.

ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
Just wanted to take a second and say hello from L.A. from a new Roadster owner.

Never owned an electric car before, but somehow a Roadster fell into my lap and I couldn't resist. Now the proud owner of #605, Orange 2010 Roadster Sport with R80 upgrade.

The car had not been used much in the past two years, but just got her back from Javier, at Exec - had the PEM re-insulated, new metal bushings installed, headlights done, and general maintenance. Had her inspected before purchase and CAC was at 205. Been charging on 110 in my garage on "standard "and range is 215. Planning on getting a 240 installed in the garage.

Unsure if there is something I should be doing to help cycle the battery after it was sitting etc. Actually open to any suggestions on anything to do with the car. There are quite a lot of rattles I need to track down - seems to be door panels etc., so sure it is manageable, but again any suggestions are great.

In honesty, just stoked to have this car, and looking forward to becoming part of this community.

Stewart
 

IslandRoadster

Former Owner of #609
Nov 24, 2018
381
293
Bainbridge Island, WA
There are quite a lot of rattles I need to track down - seems to be door panels etc., so sure it is manageable, but again any suggestions are great.

Welcome to the club!

Suggest having a sound dampening package installed. Most of the Roadster repair shops like Medlock and Gruber will install sound dampening materials. Since the have to tear everything apart to do it, you can note where the rattles are coming from and ask them to pay particular attention to those areas when they put stuff back together. It will make an enormous difference in your enjoyment of the car. You'll still hear the motor and the road, but at least you'll be able to carry on a conversation.
 
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rudholm

Member
Aug 13, 2017
226
219
Los Angeles, CA
There's really nothing to do to the battery after sitting. As long as it was plugged in, it'll maintain its health on its own. If you have a 240V electric clothes dryer outlet in or near your garage, that's a perfectly suitable power source for 240V charging (that's what I used until I got my second electric car). 240V charging is a good idea because with 120V charging, the car can't cool the battery as effectively.

If you don't already have them, you will want to get @hcsharp 's CAN-JR and CAN-SR adapters so you can charge off the ubiquitous modern Tesla and J1772 charging nozzles. If the car didn't come with the 240V mobile charging cord, you might want to consider buying a new mobile charging cord from the Tesla website. It's the one they include with new Teslas and it will work with the Roadster if you have a CAN-SR. It's a good cord, and the various plug ends are only $35 each.
 

ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
Welcome to the club!

Suggest having a sound dampening package installed. Most of the Roadster repair shops like Medlock and Gruber will install sound dampening materials. Since the have to tear everything apart to do it, you can note where the rattles are coming from and ask them to pay particular attention to those areas when they put stuff back together. It will make an enormous difference in your enjoyment of the car. You'll still hear the motor and the road, but at least you'll be able to carry on a conversation.
Island thanks for the welcome! Sound dampening sounds like exactly what I need done, will reach out to both Medlock and Gruber, although being in LA, might be a little far - wonder if anyone in LA does that?
 
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ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
There's really nothing to do to the battery after sitting. As long as it was plugged in, it'll maintain its health on its own. If you have a 240V electric clothes dryer outlet in or near your garage, that's a perfectly suitable power source for 240V charging (that's what I used until I got my second electric car). 240V charging is a good idea because with 120V charging, the car can't cool the battery as effectively.

If you don't already have them, you will want to get @hcsharp 's CAN-JR and CAN-SR adapters so you can charge off the ubiquitous modern Tesla and J1772 charging nozzles. If the car didn't come with the 240V mobile charging cord, you might want to consider buying a new mobile charging cord from the Tesla website. It's the one they include with new Teslas and it will work with the Roadster if you have a CAN-SR. It's a good cord, and the various plug ends are only $35 each.
Rudholm - thanks for the welcome. Think adding the 240 makes sense as well, so will get that done.

I believe it came with the Can-Jr (if that si the one that works with an S cord?). Was worried the other day what i need in the trunk just n case i get stuck somewhere - sounds like if i add the Can-Sr then i would mostly ok?
 

slcasner

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2011
1,392
939
Sunnyvale, CA
I believe it came with the Can-Jr (if that si the one that works with an S cord?). Was worried the other day what i need in the trunk just n case i get stuck somewhere - sounds like if i add the Can-Sr then i would mostly ok?
The CAN-SR adapter fits the USA Model S/3/X/Y cord to the Roadster, so if I interpret your post correctly, you already have that one. The CAN-JR adapter fits a J-1772 plug like those you find in public charging spots (ChargePoint, etc.).
 

ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
The CAN-SR adapter fits the USA Model S/3/X/Y cord to the Roadster, so if I interpret your post correctly, you already have that one. The CAN-JR adapter fits a J-1772 plug like those you find in public charging spots (ChargePoint, etc.).
slc - thanks for claryfing, and yes, your interpretation was correct.

Sorry for the ignorant question, but when charging somewhere in public, do i need to bring cables, or are those part of the charging station?
 

Timothy

Driving on Sunshine
May 4, 2011
434
116
No cables needed. Just the two connectors. I have a 110 volt cable at the bottom of my trunk 'just in case' there is an emergency of some sort. I haven't ever used it in the 10 years I have had the car (except to make sure it still works!)
 

gregd

Active Member
Dec 31, 2014
2,597
1,815
CM98
slc - thanks for claryfing, and yes, your interpretation was correct.

Sorry for the ignorant question, but when charging somewhere in public, do i need to bring cables, or are those part of the charging station?
Public charging stations, such as those at restaurants and shopping malls, have a cord that ends with a J1772 connector. Most are long enough to reach the car; some will require you to back into the slot. Plug the CAN-JR into the car, then the J1772 into the adapter, and it should start charging. Sometimes the "charging station" may have a few buttons to press, and some need an account (some with payment info). There's a very wide range of situations out there. Some pre-planning can be done by reviewing info posted by others online. PlugShare - Find Electric Vehicle Charging Locations Near You is a great resource for this.

At some charging stations you may find Tesla "destination" charging, which is very similar to J1772 except for the connector. Use the CAN-SR with those; same procedure. The Tesla ones sometimes have a slightly higher current available (no clue why), and might be more or less available depending on local usage. Neither of these outlets are blazingly fast - you'll get about 20-30ish miles of range per hour of charging, depending on current and voltage. Most are on commercial power, so are only 208 volts, compared to 240v at home. 30 amps is common; I've seen a few that are 32 or even 40. Vanishingly few are higher than that, as I think there are very few cars that can take more. The Roadster will take up to 70 amps, and the very early Model-S can do 80, but it's the charging station that determines how much is available (up to what the car wants). Most modern cars max out at 32 amps. And in a pinch, the "yellow cable" aka "granny lead", that will net you 4-5 miles of range per hour if it's plugged into a dedicated 20 amp outlet, or 3-4 miles if it's a regular (15 amp) one. Don't forget to never grab more than 80% of an outlet's capacity when charging, so 12 amps from a regular 15 amp outlet. The regular outlets are shared with other plugs, and it's never clear which are involved. When putting in a charging station at home, it will usually be on a 50 amp circuit, so the max is 40 amps.

I charged initially charged my car from the 120 volt outlet in the garage, but besides the slow charging and lack of A/C cooling, it often tripped the GFI breaker. Since we have an electric dryer outlet handy, I got an adapter to use that instead, eventually putting in a "real" charging station on a new outlet. I get a bit higher current with the real station, though the reality is that the 24 amps I got from the dryer outlet is still plenty to recharge a day's commuting overnight. One can share the dryer outlet with the car through a "Dryer Buddy".

Good luck, enjoy the car, and Welcome!
 

ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
Public charging stations, such as those at restaurants and shopping malls, have a cord that ends with a J1772 connector. Most are long enough to reach the car; some will require you to back into the slot. Plug the CAN-JR into the car, then the J1772 into the adapter, and it should start charging. Sometimes the "charging station" may have a few buttons to press, and some need an account (some with payment info). There's a very wide range of situations out there. Some pre-planning can be done by reviewing info posted by others online. PlugShare - Find Electric Vehicle Charging Locations Near You is a great resource for this.

At some charging stations you may find Tesla "destination" charging, which is very similar to J1772 except for the connector. Use the CAN-SR with those; same procedure. The Tesla ones sometimes have a slightly higher current available (no clue why), and might be more or less available depending on local usage. Neither of these outlets are blazingly fast - you'll get about 20-30ish miles of range per hour of charging, depending on current and voltage. Most are on commercial power, so are only 208 volts, compared to 240v at home. 30 amps is common; I've seen a few that are 32 or even 40. Vanishingly few are higher than that, as I think there are very few cars that can take more. The Roadster will take up to 70 amps, and the very early Model-S can do 80, but it's the charging station that determines how much is available (up to what the car wants). Most modern cars max out at 32 amps. And in a pinch, the "yellow cable" aka "granny lead", that will net you 4-5 miles of range per hour if it's plugged into a dedicated 20 amp outlet, or 3-4 miles if it's a regular (15 amp) one. Don't forget to never grab more than 80% of an outlet's capacity when charging, so 12 amps from a regular 15 amp outlet. The regular outlets are shared with other plugs, and it's never clear which are involved. When putting in a charging station at home, it will usually be on a 50 amp circuit, so the max is 40 amps.

I charged initially charged my car from the 120 volt outlet in the garage, but besides the slow charging and lack of A/C cooling, it often tripped the GFI breaker. Since we have an electric dryer outlet handy, I got an adapter to use that instead, eventually putting in a "real" charging station on a new outlet. I get a bit higher current with the real station, though the reality is that the 24 amps I got from the dryer outlet is still plenty to recharge a day's commuting overnight. One can share the dryer outlet with the car through a "Dryer Buddy".

Good luck, enjoy the car, and Welcome!
Greg - thanks for all the info and have just book-marked that site. Think putting in a 240 in the garage just sounds faster and better for the battery - so think it is a no brainer.

Sincerely appreciate the advice.
 

ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
No cables needed. Just the two connectors. I have a 110 volt cable at the bottom of my trunk 'just in case' there is an emergency of some sort. I haven't ever used it in the 10 years I have had the car (except to make sure it still works!)
Thanks Timothy - will get the 240v put in the garage, get the other connector i don't have, for the J1772 then throw those in the trunk with the 110v charger and I should be good to go.

Thanks for the advice - much appreciated.
 

IslandRoadster

Former Owner of #609
Nov 24, 2018
381
293
Bainbridge Island, WA
Rudholm - thanks for the welcome. Think adding the 240 makes sense as well, so will get that done.

I believe it came with the Can-Jr (if that si the one that works with an S cord?). Was worried the other day what i need in the trunk just n case i get stuck somewhere - sounds like if i add the Can-Sr then i would mostly ok?

heres what the CAN-JR and SR look like:

DA599296-B590-46F5-817B-8CB8D3410B44.jpeg
 

rudholm

Member
Aug 13, 2017
226
219
Los Angeles, CA
Island thanks for the welcome! Sound dampening sounds like exactly what I need done, will reach out to both Medlock and Gruber, although being in LA, might be a little far - wonder if anyone in LA does that?
I'm not sure if Javier does sound dampening. If he doesn't, I would go with Carl. There's some stuff I need him to do on my car, maybe we can get him to come to LA.
 

ScottishRdstr

Member
Aug 21, 2021
9
7
Los Angeles, CA
I'm not sure if Javier does sound dampening. If he doesn't, I would go with Carl. There's some stuff I need him to do on my car, maybe we can get him to come to LA.
I would be totally down with that if ti can be worked out. Would DM you but being new on the forum, think I am limited what I can do, so feel free to reach out to me. If nothing else, nice to know another LA Roadster owner.
 

augkuo

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 24, 2011
1,017
2,984
Berkeley
One thing to check is the camber of your tires especially the rear ones - when I first got my roadster I would wear out the rears in less than 10k miles and it would be mostly on one side of the tire!

If you have it in your region, change your electric billing to an EV rate - usually that would give you a big discount during the evening/early morning hours. If it's just a garage queen and lightly used then probably not worth it. Also after either a drive on a hot day or a spirited run I usually plug my car back in for 30-60 minutes at 240V/40A to cool the battery down - I have an EV rate so it'll get the full charge overnight but this is to cool the battery down right away.

Sound dampening is nice but I usually have the radio turned on full blast anyways to warn pedestrians/deer/etc. - not sure if it'll get rid of all the creaks and rattles anyways ;)
 

rudholm

Member
Aug 13, 2017
226
219
Los Angeles, CA
If you have it in your region, change your electric billing to an EV rate - usually that would give you a big discount during the evening/early morning hours. If it's just a garage queen and lightly used then probably not worth it. Also after either a drive on a hot day or a spirited run I usually plug my car back in for 30-60 minutes at 240V/40A to cool the battery down - I have an EV rate so it'll get the full charge overnight but this is to cool the battery down right away.

I find Southern California Edison's Time-of-Use price plans to be ideal. With the one I'm on, the cheapest rate is 12 cents per kWh between 10pm and 8am, so that's when I charge the cars.
 

Timothy

Driving on Sunshine
May 4, 2011
434
116
I find Southern California Edison's Time-of-Use price plans to be ideal. With the one I'm on, the cheapest rate is 12 cents per kWh between 10pm and 8am, so that's when I charge the cars.
Agreed. I have a similar plan. And solar panels (see the photo at left behind the Roadster) with PowerWalls--so I now drive for free!
 

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