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Sharing our Tesla chargers....

Discussion in 'Europe' started by nowtleft, Jul 25, 2017.

  1. nowtleft

    nowtleft Member

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    Now that the EV bandwagon appears to be gaining momentum in the UK and after I paid a lot of money for my S with free supercharging I do not really want to have to wait to charge in the future while a Mini or Leaf uses a Tesla charger.

    Not sure where this is heading as the charging conundrum seems to be answered by Tesla but not fully appreciated by ANY other manufacturer.

    I know if is VERY frustrating to use non Tesla chargers as they all seem to use different leads, charge cards and other things.

    It needs addressing soon but I would personally NOT vote to share a Tesla charger and being made to do so would put me off Tesla to some degree.

    Thoughts????
     
    • Disagree x 1
  2. Tiger

    Tiger Member

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    Would you be ok with it if either:
    a) Tesla cars would have priority, you would have right to unplug non Tesla (extension cord) if in hurry.
    b) or Tesla superchargers would have so much capacity that congestion would never be an issue.

    Would either of these be sufficient alone?
     
  3. azred

    azred Member

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    a) might net you a black eye; b) is highly unlikely in the foreseeable future.
     
  4. nowtleft

    nowtleft Member

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    Hi, I cant see a BMW being happy if he was unplugged but do feel that the second option could work.

    Point is that THIS is the big thing which is NOT being addressed currently. There must be an easy solution:)
     
  5. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Well-Known Member

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    You should be less concerned about the future if there's higher volume.

    The key to it is maintaining an appropriate chargers:cars ratio. As long as the ratio's OK it doesn't matter.
     
  6. PeterHG

    PeterHG Member

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    Chill, man. My optimistic expectation is that as the total number of EVs increases, the number of charging stations will also increase, including new locations and super fast charging. So charging could become even easier. Plus costs will come down as more R&D dollars go into batteries, prices will come down due to competition, the world will be quieter, greener, etc.
     
    • Like x 2
  7. arg

    arg Supporting Member

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    Furthermore, the maths of the situation says that bigger sites are better - a 4-stall site can serve much more than twice the traffic of a 2-stall site, for the same probability of finding all stalls full.

    So if Tesla and a hypothetical CNX motors each build a just-adequate quantity of charging for their respective customers, side-by-side, then the experience for customers would be much better if CNX and Tesla combined their resources into a single network with twice as many stalls at each location. Or if they are each building large sites but not many of them (to get those economies of scale), then combining the networks gets a greater chance of finding one where you need it with no worse risk of finding it busy.

    The only cases where Tesla sharing with another vendor would be harmful is if the other vendor doesn't contribute to the build-out, or if the other vendor's vehicles are so slow that they block the superchargers for a disproportionate amount of time. It is hard to imagine that Tesla would enter a partnership like that.
     
    • Love x 1
  8. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Provided that Tesla only license similar fast-charging-capable vehicles I don't have a problem with it.

    I find it extraordinary that no other Marque has done a deal with Tesla on fast-charging.

    Here's how I see it:

    At some point in the future, after massive roll out of fast-chargers by 3rd parties, there will be N x Tesla Superchargers and N x Other-Brand Fast Chargers - at that point in time I have 2x as many places to charge as someone in a non-Tesla, so that makes Tesla a much more preferable choice and A.N.Other Brand limited to 50% of the available chargers.

    If OTOH Volvo (say) do a deal with Tesla then Volvo drivers also have that advantage.

    When there is a fast-charger on every street corner then the point becomes moot - but we must be a decade, or maybe even two??, away from that point surely?
     
    • Like x 2
  9. nowtleft

    nowtleft Member

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    How much would it cost for every single gas station to put a fast charger where the fuel pumps are? Not as much as separate fast charging stations. Seems simple but as ever the "professionals" make it as difficult and expensive as possible!
     
  10. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    • Like x 1
  11. nowtleft

    nowtleft Member

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    CPSGenie |

    This is just one company which provides LOTS of fast chargers in London (good), Cornwall (why?) and the Lake District - why NONE in the Midlands where millions of people live????

    Needs a governing body set up to apply common sense and pull the whole together.
     
  12. arg

    arg Supporting Member

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    Government funding. Funding was allocated regionally, and each region then went out to tender for an operator to install and/or manage their chargepoints.

    Hence although it looks like we have a competitive market with half a dozen national charging operators, in reality each one has a local monopoly in particular areas.

    This is slowly changing as more commercial locations are added in addition to the public sector ones, but that's the explanation for most of what you see on the ground.
     
  13. nowtleft

    nowtleft Member

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    well it isnt working! Lets hope someone has some sense|!!
     

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