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Should a Model S be able to rescue another Model S?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by AC1K, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. AC1K

    AC1K Member

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    Just like regular ICE vehicles can "Jump" another, should the Model S be able to partially charge another Model S?

    i don't think it would be complicated just like a Nissan Leaf is capable of powering a house in the event of a blackout.

    maybe a feature that allows you to set the "needed" kms and the cars will automatically stop when that number has been reached
     
  2. Rodolfo Paiz

    Rodolfo Paiz P85 "Plug and Play"

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    I don't know what the specific challenges might be in implementing that idea. At first glance, it sounds like a great idea. Maybe a special "direct connect" cable to the two charging ports with some software implementation would do it?
     
  3. efxjim

    efxjim Member

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    If the AC charger/s in the car can take the 380-400VDC as an input It would be possible. If the batteries were directly connected and their charge levels were very different a huge amount of power would be transmitted across the connector cable. Enough to fry even a supercharger cable. A cable could be constructed that signals the donor car to enable direct connection to the battery. The other end would connect to the car needing the charge and the on board chargers would take the DC voltage and control it so the car could safely charge itself.
     
  4. Ampster

    Ampster Member

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    We are talking a DC to DC connection I presume, so the chargers would be out of the loop because they are AC devices. As mentioned it could involve a lot of Amps. Presumably the Supercharger connection controls the power going in on the car being charged and that might be sufficient. The trick of course is getting a DC connection on the donor car.
     
  5. sub

    sub Member

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    This is actually a good idea, but take the same concept and apply it to the Tesla rangers. They can have some batters mounted in their trucks charged at all times. If anyone comes up "short" trying to get home or to another charger, they can be called up and plugged in on the spot. I have heard talk of the rangers being able to swap batters, but this would be a much better idea. A forward thinking tow service could also have this capability. Talk about range anxiety disappearing completely.
     
  6. Rodolfo Paiz

    Rodolfo Paiz P85 "Plug and Play"

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    Don't Superchargers already supply up to 480VDC? If so, and given that we know all Tesla batteries can handle supercharging, then the battery capacity is already there. It would then appear to be simply a function of the right cable, and software controlling the transfer of power. The donor car would probably need to set the amount of energy to transfer (in miles or KW) and then the cars could do everything on their own.
     
  7. AC1K

    AC1K Member

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    Oh yeah i forgot, the operation would be similar to this, both the mobile charger and smartphone use a similar battery, charging is controlled at 5v DC @ 2.1A

    gsmarena_002.jpg
     
  8. simplesolar

    simplesolar Member

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    can we use the 12v to plug in an inverter and charge the model S or use other appliances?
     
  9. dirkhh

    dirkhh Middle-aged Member

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    Awesome idea. The 12V plug is usually limted to 15A, so about 180W. So in two hours you might be able to charge the other car enough to go a mile (not taking into consideration any charging loss). IIRC, you need to add at least 3 miles (~1kWh) to a completely empty Tesla before it will start. So that's about 6h from a 12V plug...
     
  10. rolosrevenge

    rolosrevenge Dr. EVS

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    That voids the warranty on the Roadster, I'm sure that it'd do the same for the S. In addition to the extra degradation Tesla doesn't want to deal with, some of those inverters have some nasty harmonics that can seriously damage the pack.
     

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