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Should have paid $30 for Valet!

Went to a show at the Paramount theater in Oakland last night. Drove past valet parking for $30, thought, why not circle the block and just see...found a great parking spot! 20th st, between telegraph and San Pablo.

Came back from the show to this:


From my research, because of the chrome trim it will certainly exceed my $1000 deductible and not qualify as “glass only”. Who designs a car where a rear quarter panel window costs $1400 to fix? Geez.

Anyway I’m in the Oakland/Walnut Creek area. If anyone has any recommendation on how to get it done right and at lowest cost I’d appreciate it.
 

BluestarE3

Active Member
Apr 2, 2016
4,088
5,216
Norcal
Went to a show at the Paramount theater in Oakland last night. Drove past valet parking for $30, thought, why not circle the block and just see...found a great parking spot! 20th st, between telegraph and San Pablo.

Came back from the show to this:


From my research, because of the chrome trim it will certainly exceed my $1000 deductible and not qualify as “glass only”. Who designs a car where a rear quarter panel window costs $1400 to fix? Geez.

Anyway I’m in the Oakland/Walnut Creek area. If anyone has any recommendation on how to get it done right and at lowest cost I’d appreciate it.
Sorry to see that happen to you. Did you have your rear seats flipped down and/or Sentry Mode enabled?
 

SMAlset

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2017
9,420
10,331
SF Bay Area
Went to a show at the Paramount theater in Oakland last night. Drove past valet parking for $30, thought, why not circle the block and just see...found a great parking spot! 20th st, between telegraph and San Pablo.

Came back from the show to this:


From my research, because of the chrome trim it will certainly exceed my $1000 deductible and not qualify as “glass only”. Who designs a car where a rear quarter panel window costs $1400 to fix? Geez.

Anyway I’m in the Oakland/Walnut Creek area. If anyone has any recommendation on how to get it done right and at lowest cost I’d appreciate it.

Had a feeling when I saw the title this might be what it was about. Sorry man. Had the same thing happen to our MS a while back in 2017, think ours was over $1200 and that was when Tesla was doing the repairs at the SvC, not sure what the procedure is now to get it fixed. And yes the trim needed to be removed and then replaced and resealed. At least it will be less expensive than going over a cliff ;). Good luck with the insurance and hopefully no rain in the forecast.

Did your new car come with HW2.5 (and now Sentry Mode update)?
 
Last edited:
Had a feeling when I saw the title this might be what it was about. Sorry man. Had the same thing happen to our MS a while back in 2017, think ours was over $1200 and that was when Tesla was doing the repairs at the SvC, not sure what the procedure is now to get it fixed. And yes the trim needed to be removed and then replaced and resealed. At least it will be less expensive than going over a cliff ;). Good luck with the insurance and hopefully no rain in the forecast.

Did your new car come with HW2.5 (and now Sentry Mode update)?
Just missed the window for HW2.5, i'm on 2.0. And yes, better than the cliff :)

Found a glass shop that saved the trim, and did it for $645. Was referred to them by Tesla mobile service rep. Auto Glass Express based in Berkeley. Came to my condo and did it, I recommend them. My insurance (progressive) doesn't have a separate glass deductible so I had to pay out of pocket. Oh well, moving on!

I think if I do need ot park in sketchy areas I'll just put the seat down so criminals can look in and see there is nothing. I only put valuables in the frunk.
 

mociaf9

Active Member
Oct 18, 2018
3,277
6,868
CA
Hi. I'm trying to understand why people are doing this and why is it so common in the bay area. New to the forum. I live in Southern California and am tripping on why this happens??
The widespread nature of the problem is because small scale property crimes don't result in jail/prison sentences of any real length in CA anymore due to overcrowding in our jails/prisons. So, even when perpetrators are caught and prosecuted they won't spend hardly any time locked up. This very, very rarely happens anyway; police and prosecutors know they can't keep the perps in jail/prison for much time too, so why put in a lot of effort? Hence, it's viewed pretty much as a punishment-free crime and an easy way to make money for the criminally inclined or morally lax.

As for why that particular piece of glass and why so many Teslas? In general, breaking that small triangular pane of glass is less likely to trigger alarms on cars which have them connected to the glass. Which means more time for thieves to access the car without fear of being interrupted or discovered. Plus on the Teslas, which don't/didn't alarm for broken glass, you can reach your arm into the car through that area and easily reach the release to drop the rear bench seat-back. And, on Teslas, that release is something that can't be locked without resorting to aftermarket modifications/products which isn't very common. Upon which the thief can see whether there are potential valuables locked/hidden in the trunk which would otherwise be out of view. If there's something in the trunk, they will open the door to grab it or break more glass to be able to reach it. If not, they'll just walk away. Teslas in general, but Model 3s in particular, fit a bad vehicle demographic for this crime because 1) they either are high value cars or they are perceived as such and therefore more likely to contain valuable loot, 2) so many of them are new cars since the Model 3 has only really been out for a bit more than a year (again this is tied to likelihood of valuable loot, since the owner is well off enough to recently buy such an expensive car; but new cars of all types are more likely to be broken into than older models), 3) Teslas don't/didn't sound alarms when that piece of glass was broken and so became known within the smash-and-grab crews as an easy mark, 4) thieves can quickly gain access to the trunk and see if valuables are hidden.

I imagine it's such an issue in the Bay Area due to the relatively high density of Teslas in the area and "the word" went out to the Bay Area car thieves that it was easy on those pricey cars.
 
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Reactions: kavyboy
The widespread nature of the problem is because small scale property crimes don't result in jail/prison sentences of any real length in CA anymore due to overcrowding in our jails/prisons. So, even when perpetrators are caught and prosecuted they won't spend hardly any time locked up. This very, very rarely happens anyway; police and prosecutors know they can't keep the perps in jail/prison for much time too, so why put in a lot of effort? Hence, it's viewed pretty much as a punishment-free crime and an easy way to make money for the criminally inclined or morally lax.

As for why that particular piece of glass and why so many Teslas? In general, breaking that small triangular pane of glass is less likely to trigger alarms on cars which have them connected to the glass. Which means more time for thieves to access the car without fear of being interrupted or discovered. Plus on the Teslas, which don't/didn't alarm for broken glass, you can reach your arm into the car through that area and easily reach the release to drop the rear bench seat-back. And, on Teslas, that release is something that can't be locked without resorting to aftermarket modifications/products which isn't very common. Upon which the thief can see whether there are potential valuables locked/hidden in the trunk which would otherwise be out of view. If there's something in the trunk, they will open the door to grab it or break more glass to be able to reach it. If not, they'll just walk away. Teslas in general, but Model 3s in particular, fit a bad vehicle demographic for this crime because 1) they either are high value cars or they are perceived as such and therefore more likely to contain valuable loot, 2) so many of them are new cars since the Model 3 has only really been out for a bit more than a year (again this is tied to likelihood of valuable loot, since the owner is well off enough to recently buy such an expensive car; but new cars of all types are more likely to be broken into than older models), 3) Teslas don't/didn't sound alarms when that piece of glass was broken and so became known within the smash-and-grab crews as an easy mark, 4) thieves can quickly gain access to the trunk and see if valuables are hidden.

I imagine it's such an issue in the Bay Area due to the relatively high density of Teslas in the area and "the word" went out to the Bay Area car thieves that it was easy on those pricey cars.
Nice analysis.

Ironically enough, the gen1 mobile connector was inside my truck and easily visible/stealable, but the thief chose not to steal it, despite it being more valuable than the things they probably end up breaking windows for like bags with unknown contents. So...I'm glad this particular thief wasn't aware of the value.
 

mociaf9

Active Member
Oct 18, 2018
3,277
6,868
CA
It won't protect your glass from being broken, but for those who'd like something to keep potential thieves out of their Model 3's trunk, you can check out this 3D printed mechanism from @jonco223 . Links to the files for 2 versions--the one shown in the video and one that's a bit more robust because it's put together with bolts instead of snapping together--hosted on Thingiverse are listed in the YT video description.

Link to video on YT

 

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